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Bellow are some samples of my photography with a narrative produced for educational multimediapresentations. Most of this ...
An infusion of common sense, non-partisan checks and balances are needed for accountable regulation,which will insure a su...
Alaska, the Last Frontier --Flying above an older oil facility, it can clearly be seen -- the years of oil production have...
An old barn in the shadow of Anacortes oil refinery. Theres something charming about old barns as they weather the years. T...
EARTH Day – Thursday April 22, 2010 EARTH Day seems to have more meaning as the impact of global warming, seismicand volca...
Our world is delicately balanced, spinning through space, with us all aboard along forthe journey. At least one day, one w...
“One World, One Planet.” A fascinating, outdoor setting, with one of the most diverse ecosystems is the Rainforestof the O...
transparency, then enhancingit with Photoshop, the world continents clearly revealed themselves in what Iʼve themed– “One ...
“Paradise Lost” – The enchanting scene with a man gazing into the pools of water is from Whatcom Falls.My college roommate...
“Paradise Found” – I remember a photography teacher I had in college took us to a beach near ChukanutDrive. When he gave o...
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On a moonlit night, traveling on the back-roads of Washington and Oregon -- we found countless sentinels standing guard ag...
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Environmental Photo Essay for Clean Alternative Energy

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Environmental Photo Essay for Clean Alternative Energy.

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Environmental Photo Essay for Clean Alternative Energy

  1. 1. Bellow are some samples of my photography with a narrative produced for educational multimediapresentations. Most of this photography was created while on assignment for private sector clientele. Manyof these clients are recognized as world leaders in their fields, this recognition establishes rapport and re-spect from students that I teach using these presentation. From my assignments over the years, I have de-veloped presentations on composition, creative techniques and technical procedures covering digital pho-tography and nonlinear video production. These presentations are unique in content, as they are not derivedsolely from academia, but from, “real world” media assignments which help captivate student’s attention andpromote creativity. The lessons are delivered using my passion and energy which has helped sustained mein one of the most competitive fields of visual communications. Because I remain active in servicing theprivate/public sector; new content will be added to my multimedia presentations to help sustain their rele-vance for the demands of a changing educational/working environment.In the Gulf of Mexico:  BP = Black Plague  Spring 2010David Axelrod --Senior Advisor to President Obama stated on June 13th, 2010 - NBC, "Meet the Press," the Admin-istration viewed the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, more like an "epidemic."An epidemic is a fair description of the gulf-oil-spill -- as something that cant be easily viewed or comprehended. Likethe Black Plague that silently... without warning crept over Europe in the Middle Ages, the Gulf Spill shares similarsymptoms with its hidden, silent attack on the Gulf Coast marine environment.My original photo series for Earth Day was sent out to friends and clients less then two days after BPs DeepwaterHorizon oil rig, tragically exploded and caught on fire.  At the time, it wasnt clear this catastrophe would become theworst environmental disaster in U.S. history.Now, months later, with 11 lives lost, ecosystems destroyed and over 2 million barrels of crude oil spilling into the Gulfof Mexico, the nightmare continues. If all this economic and environmental morass werent enough, we have irre-sponsible individuals trying to muddy the waters by playing politics with the real cause and the corporate entities re-sponsible for the oil spill.Perhaps more-than-ever, my Earth Day essay sent in April, currently has more significance now that our marine envi-ronment is clearly suffering symptoms from the dreaded petroleum attack. So, Im resending  this Earth Day photoessay, along with new images which directly relate to oil exploration and alternative energy sources.My hope is that we all wake-up by educating ourselves to the issues on energy, the environment and responsiblegovernment which ideally represents our nations best interest. Blind, gutted deregulation is the main cause for allow-ing industrial standards of health and safety to evaporate away -- not just for energy production, but banking, trade/capital markets, telecommunications and the list goes on beyond the horizon.Unfortunately, if we as individuals are collectively content to just blame the previous administration or our current onefor the disaster in the Gulf, we only polarize the issues, allowing the status quo to be sustained, until the next out-break of disaster spreads again. 1
  2. 2. An infusion of common sense, non-partisan checks and balances are needed for accountable regulation,which will insure a sustainable economy supported by a safe, clean and healthy environment. (On the left horizon, hydrocarbons are being released into the air, blemishing an otherwise clear arctic day.)All Roads Lead to Nowhere --Early in my career as photographer, I received assignments which took me above theArctic Circle.  Construction companies and architects doing work for oil companies inAlaskas North Slope hired me to photograph their on going developments. At that timethe Prudhoe Bay oil fieldʼs production had peaked due to years of sustained extraction.A new oil field near the Kurparuk River, west of Prudhoe Bay was the site I was sentto. The Kuparuk oil field is the second largest oil field in North America by area, andtraveling by aircraft was the way I traveled from site to site.Almost all roads and construction above the arctic circle, relies on heaps of gravelplaced over the surface tundra to prevent them from sinking into the earth when theground thaws. Traveling less than 100 feet off the tundra, at close to 150 miles per hour,the pilot of the Hughes 500D helicopter races to horizon. The orange shelters at theedge of the road is our intended destination. These shelters are used to pump hotsteam down-into the wells, to recover dwindling oil reserves, locked deep below the fro-zen tundra. 2
  3. 3. Alaska, the Last Frontier --Flying above an older oil facility, it can clearly be seen -- the years of oil production haveleft Rorschach-like-ink-blots, splattered on the surrounding tundra. I have not been tothe oil fields for many years, but I was told at the time, the oil companies were trying to"cleaning up their act and leaving a smaller footprint." I pray what I heard was true, butstill, as we know -- accidents do happen.One day flying over vast stretches of tundra, I spotted dozens of randomly placed metal-lic cylinders. The pilot brought the airplane down for a closer look and cynically said --those are abandoned, empty 50 gallon oil barrels... known as -"Alaskas state flower." 3
  4. 4. An old barn in the shadow of Anacortes oil refinery. Theres something charming about old barns as they weather the years. This one withits organic wood earth tones, is contrasted against the metallic cylinders of an oil refin-ery in Anacortes, about 70 miles north of Seattle, on the edge of Puget Sound. The month of April was a tragic time for oil disasters. On April 2nd,  five workers were killed at this oil refinery as an explosion and fire ripped through part of the refinery. 4
  5. 5. EARTH Day – Thursday April 22, 2010 EARTH Day seems to have more meaning as the impact of global warming, seismicand volcanic activity focuses our attention on the big picture. 5
  6. 6. Our world is delicately balanced, spinning through space, with us all aboard along forthe journey. At least one day, one week, out of a busy calendar year, weʼre asked to givehomage to our planet by being aware of itsʼ environment. In honor of this day, Iʼm send-ing out photographs and prose that reflect current events affecting our worldʼs environ-ment. 6
  7. 7. “One World, One Planet.” A fascinating, outdoor setting, with one of the most diverse ecosystems is the Rainforestof the Olympic National Forest. It was a late summer day when I hiked down form LakeOsset, to where the rainforest meets the Pacific Ocean. This area has never beenlogged, the old growth forest here stands as it has for thousands of years. After settingup a tent I walked on a trail leading to a lush meadow. A twig snapped a few feet awayfrom me, revealing two unusual looking deer, grassing in the tall grass. Never have Iencountered wildlife where if I desired, could reach out and touch it. The deer couldplainly see me; yet they made no effort to scramble away or even conceal themselves.The reason this wildlife seems tame is that they reside within a remote National park,where no hunting is allowed.  Slowly, I raised my camera loaded with my favorite Ko-dachrome transparency film. As I began to take a series of photos, I noticed unusu-al patterned markings on the deerʼs body.  Refocusing my lens, amazingly, what ap-peared was a map of the earth, patterned on the deer. Last year I scanned the 7
  8. 8. transparency, then enhancingit with Photoshop, the world continents clearly revealed themselves in what Iʼve themed– “One Planet, One World.”   “Paradise Lost” – Have you ever gone back to a place and found what you had once treasured was miss-ing? Thatʼs the theme of the two photos, seen above and below. The image with the oldgrowth stumps in the pond was taken on Camano Island, using my medium for-mat, Hasselblad camera. At one time, this location would have been a stunning place tobe standing under the shadows of a virgin forest, with towering Douglas-firs and Cedartrees reaching for the sun overhead. 8
  9. 9. “Paradise Lost” – The enchanting scene with a man gazing into the pools of water is from Whatcom Falls.My college roommate sitting on the moss-covered boulders is Mark Nishimura, a fine-artphotographer, originally from the state of Hawaii. Mark asked that I photograph him in aplace that was reminiscent of the waterfalls back home on Ohau. I used a Hasselbladand slow speed transparency film to help capture the dynamic range of shadows andhighlights. This was one of my favorite places to photograph when I attended school atWestern Washington University, in Bellingham. Many students would spend summerafternoons cooling off, diving and swimming amongst the deep pools of water. A shortwalk into Whatcom Park, placed you in a lush environment, under a thick canopy of ev-ergreen trees, moss covered vegetation with sounds of cascading waterfalls runningthroughout it. Some years after this photo was taken, tragedy struck, instantly incinerat-ing this charming environment. A refineryʼs 16-inch fuel-line running next to the park,ruptured, spewing nearly 300 thousand gallons of gasoline into the creek. In an instant,the fuel ignited, creating a river of fire, which killed three youths fishing in the creek andsending a toxic vapor cloud six miles into the atmosphere. The fireball and plume ofsmoke was visible from Anacortes to Vancouver, B.C., Canada.  Now, ten years afterthe catastrophe, I plan to return to the falls and photograph the site with hopes that na-tureʼs healing process is transforming it back to the way it use to be.  9
  10. 10. “Paradise Found” – I remember a photography teacher I had in college took us to a beach near ChukanutDrive. When he gave out the assignment, most of the class groaned; we were to pick aspot on the beach, stay within a 25-foot diameter and shoot a series of photos to tell astory. Most of us wanted to take our cameras and explore what the entire beach had tooffer. Surprisingly, it was one of the best assignments I was ever given in school; be-cause it broke the stereotype about how you were suppose to see. Within that smalldomain we discovered, a whole universe was waiting to reveal itself before the cameralens. That photography lesson has stuck with me since, although world travel is a pas-sion, I realize that I really didnʼt have to go any farther than my backyard to find greatimages and no matter what, if resourceful, amazing subjects can be found everywhere.My homeʼs back yard is like an outdoor studio full of indigenous plants, birds and am-phibians. We avoid using pesticides and only use natural fertilizers on the yard and gar-den. One afternoon I found this charming tree frog sitting on a leaf, warming itself in thesunshine. With a macro lens on my camera, I was able to get within inches of thefrog and let the background merge into soft abstract forms. The photo makes me smilewhenever I see it because it reminds me, I never have to go far to reconnect with na-ture. 10
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  13. 13. On a moonlit night, traveling on the back-roads of Washington and Oregon -- we found countless sentinels standing guard against the cold breeze of darkness.The Future is Now...Working tirelessly with the wind, turbines spin against the moon backdrop, producingclean energy for the Pacific Northwest. Throughout the Americas and many otherplaces in the world, the tide is turning as we move more towards wind and solar for aclean, renewable energy source.   David Johanson VasquezBig Picture Photography206.799.4848www.bigpicturephoto.usdavid@bigpicturephoto.us 13

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