Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

How Green is Your Vivaria

617 views

Published on

Presentation given on sustainable animal research facility design to the research and animal care staff at New York University Langone Medical Center on October 8, 2007.

Published in: Design
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

How Green is Your Vivaria

  1. 1. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence How Green is Your Vivarium?
  2. 2. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Sustainability Overview  What is it?  Why does it matter?  How does it impact my campus?  Sustainable Design Approach  Practical Applications – Case Study  Next Steps  Questions & Discussion Agenda Planning Design Execution
  3. 3. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence What does going Green mean?
  4. 4. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence The ability to meet our needs today without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. in other words...achieving a sustainable civilization What does going Green mean?
  5. 5. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence What is a Sustainable civilization? Let’s consider this question from several viewpoints …  The environment and human health.  Stable global economy that uses energy and resources efficiently.  Social and political structures that lead to a just society
  6. 6. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence What is a Sustainable civilization? To understand our role, let’s focus on the first two …  The environment and human health.  Stable global economy that uses energy and resources efficiently.
  7. 7. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Uses technologies to produce needed goods that do no harm to human health or the environment.  Uses renewable resources (plant-based substances or solar energy) rather than exhaust the limited supply of fossil fuels. What is a Sustainable civilization?
  8. 8. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  At the end of their use, manufactured materials are recycled if not readily biodegradable (easily broken down into harmless substances in the environment). What is a Sustainable civilization?
  9. 9. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Manufacturing processes are either designed so as not to produce waste products – OR –  Waste products are recycled or made biodegradable. What is a Sustainable civilization?
  10. 10. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Mountains of solid waste are piling up - particularly in industrialized nations.  Air and water pollution continue to be problems in many places. Are we there yet?
  11. 11. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Are we there yet?  Escalating energy use and depletion of fossil fuel resources threatens global economic stability.  Global warming from increasing green house gas (GHG) emissions potentially can result in catastrophic climate changes.
  12. 12. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Converging global events  US oil production peaked in the 1970’s.  Since, 75% of all known US oil reserves are exhausted and now consume the last 25%.  US natural gas production peaked in 1973.  To keep US gas production steady, thousands more wells are drilled every year. US Crude Oil Production Projection Source: Energy Information Administration, Department of Energy
  13. 13. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Currently, global warming is 0.7°C above pre-industrial levels.  To avoid dangerous climate change, scientists tell us global warming must be kept under 2°C above pre- industrial levels.  At 3°C, the potential for catastrophic climate change could exist. Earth’s Surface Temperature Converging global events
  14. 14. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Buildings are responsible for almost half (48%) of all energy consumption and GHG emissions annually; globally percentage is even greater.  Seventy-six percent (76%) of all power plant-generated electricity is used just to operate buildings. Contribution of buildings
  15. 15. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  17% of fresh water flow  25% of wood harvested  50% of CFC production  40% of energy flow  33% of total CO2 emissions  40% of landfill material  30% of buildings have “sick building syndrome”  95% of total energy use in a building is used in its construction Contribution of buildings
  16. 16. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Total US building stock equals approximately 300 billion sf.  Annually, approximately 1.75 billion sf of US buildings are torn down.  Approximately 5 billion sf is renovated yearly.  Approximately 5 billion sf is new construction each year.  By 2035, almost 75% of the built environment will be new or renovated. Greening opportunities
  17. 17. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Growth rate of GHG emissions can be slowed and reversed to keep global warming under 1°C above today’s levels:  Implementing innovative sustainable design strategies,  generating on-site renewable power and/or  purchasing (20% maximum) renewable energy and/or certified renewable energy credits. Greening opportunities
  18. 18. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Environmental Benefits  Reduce impact of natural resource consumption  Economic Benefits  Improve the bottom line  Health and Safety Benefits  Enhance occupant comfort and health  Community Benefits  Minimize strain on local infrastructures and improve quality of life How can Green impact my campus?
  19. 19. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Top 10 Heaviest Users of Energy BTU/ Student Cost / Student  Citadel Military College, SC 485 $685  University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 461 $826  Purdue University, Ind. 429 $259  Duke University, NC 424 $1,616  The University of Tulsa, OK 417 $488  University of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR 411 $326  New Mexico State University, NM 404 $841  University of Missouri, Rolla, MO 402 $945  Louisiana State University School 389 $1,533 of Medicine, Shreveport, LA  University of Illinois / Urbana- Champaign, IL 387 $585 Source: Society of College and University Planners Survey How can Green impact my campus?
  20. 20. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Top 10 Lightest Users of Energy BTU/ Student Cost / Student  Marquette University, WI 88 $196  Portland State University, OR 91 $130  University of Miami, FL 110 $186  University of Wisconsin, White Water, WI 120 $186  Central Piedmont Community College, Charlotte, NC 123 $171  Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA 127 $713  Haverford College, Haverford, PA 129 $997  Azusa Pacific University, Azusa, CA 133 $161  University of the South, Sewanee, TN 134 $1037  Moravian College, Bethlehem, PA 136 $560 Source: Society of College and University Planners Survey How can Green impact my campus?
  21. 21. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Risks  What have you spent on asbestos removal?  What materials are on the EPA dangerous materials list today?  What is your present risk if fuel costs continue to go up?  What is your risk if state funding for your campus decreases? How can Green impact my campus?
  22. 22. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Risks  How much are “sick buildings” costing?  Are your buildings helping or hurting in attracting the best talent?  Are your buildings helping your people be productive?  How many complaints do you get daily?  How many complaints do you have yourself have about where you work? How can Green impact my campus?
  23. 23. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Sustainability ...  It’s good for the environment  It’s good for users  It reduces risk  It makes economic sense What does Green mean?
  24. 24. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Sustainable Design Approach How Green is Your Vivarium?
  25. 25. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Going Green demands… a new perspective What does Green mean? Old Decision Model New Decision Model Schedule Quality Cost NOW Schedule Schedule Cost Human Safety Ecology Quality FUTURE
  26. 26. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Sustainable design approach How do we get started?  Think Globally....Act Locally  Strategic Animal Facilities Master Plan  Holistic Integrated Approach  New Concepts - Higher Efficient Designs  Use USGBC LEED rating system as your guide  Green your operations  Life Cycle Costing  Use of Computer Modeling  Right Sizing of Systems  Reduce your carbon footprint
  27. 27. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Time Opportunities Time Cost Sustainable design approach
  28. 28. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Getting Started: Animal Facilities Master Plan  Centralize animal care facilities and core facilities  Identify facility opportunities for consolidation  Analyze animal use / population trends  Project animal use & census growth over a 5 – 10 year horizon  Develop a strategic plan to accommodate current & future growth need  NIH and other grant funding  Project more conservative growth  Evaluate & assess capacity of existing facilities  Life Cycle / O&M cost-benefit analysis to determine Renovation vs. New Construction Sustainable design approach
  29. 29. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Develop vivarium design standards & guidelines  Labs 21:Defines adaptability, adjustability and expandability  Adaptability - First level of flexibility is a laboratory's ability to adapt to different uses without requiring physical changes.  Adjustability - Second level of a laboratory's flexibility is its ability to adjust and redirect function with minimum disruption of operations.  Expandability - Third level of a laboratory's flexibility is its capacity for renovations that reassemble interchangeable subcomponents into new spatial configurations or new functional assemblies. Getting Started: Animal Facilities Master Plan Sustainable design approach
  30. 30. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Comprehensive Design Standards  A 15’x 24’ (350 s.f.) room allows efficient utilization of various racking systems, cage sizes and pens.  Typical drains & services minimize downtime in specie change- out or room wash down.  Standardized racks and cages maximize density, increase utilization, and reduces required net assignable area. Page 78 of 94 Green vivarium strategies
  31. 31. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Mice / Rats Only Multiple Species  Standardized animal rooms  Standardized cages  Standardized animal care  Facilitates automation  Higher quality environment for rodents  Lower animal care cost  Less convenient access for researchers using non-rodents  Sound Attenuation Issues  Increased Cage Processing Requirements  Cleaning Protocols & Standard Operating Procedures Vary. Page 81 of 94 Green vivarium strategies
  32. 32. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Rodent Caging Systems – Conventional  Facility as Barrier  Short term studies – Vented Micro-isolator  Immune-suppressed  Transgenic – Ventilated Containment  Cage as Barrier  Long term studies  Room sizes (large / small / isolation)  HVAC needs (temperature / humidity / directional air flow) Equipment Page 23 of 94 Green vivarium strategies
  33. 33. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Improved flexibility/functional agility  Minimized Building Footprint  Census Optimization  Internal and External Security  Efficient use of labor & infrastructure  Cage Processing Efficiency  Environmental Controls / Monitoring  Energy Optimization  Greater protocol compliance  Animal Health & Safety  Occupational Health & Safety Page 76 of 94 Sustainable design approach Vivarium Benefits
  34. 34. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Green Benefits  Minimized building footprint – more density without impact to green space  Greater facility utilization – accommodate growth in less space  Optimize energy efficiency - operational savings & stable per diems  Increased staff productivity – better services, greater animal care and protocol compliance. Sustainable design approach
  35. 35. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  LEED Rating System - evaluates 6 categories 1. Sustainable Sites 2. Water Efficiency 3. Energy & Atmosphere 4. Materials & Resources 5. Indoor Environmental Quality 6. Innovation and Design Process Sustainable design approach Design & Construction
  36. 36. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence 1. Sustainable Sites  Prerequisite – Erosion and Sedimentation Control  Credit 1 – Site Selection  Credit 2 – Development Density  Credit 3 – Brownfield Redevelopment  Credit 4 – Alternative Transportation  Credit 5 – Reduced Site Disturbance  Credit 6 – Storm water Management  Credit 7 – Heat Island Effect  Credit 8 – Light Pollution Reduction 2. Water Efficiency 3. Energy & Atmosphere 4. Materials & Resources 5. Indoor Environmental Quality 6. Organization LEED rating system
  37. 37. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Establish and design to ANSI, OSHA, etc. plus industry best practices.  Use mathematical modeling, physical modeling and/or post-construction testing and certification to prove compliance.  Separate animal facility exhaust from laboratory exhaust to avoid cross contamination. Site Design: Air Effluent Management Sustainable design approach
  38. 38. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Protect municipal sewage treatment works from pollutant discharge from building operations.  Establish a drain discharge restriction policy that ensures routine discharges for laboratory and maintenance operations meet the most rigorous sewer use or local limits ordinances, so that no interceptor structure is required. Site Design: Water Effluent Management Sustainable design approach
  39. 39. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence 1. Sustainable Sites 2. Water Efficiency  Credit 1 - Water Efficient Landscaping  Credit 2 - Innovative Wastewater Technologies  Credit 3 - Water Use Reduction 3. Energy & Atmosphere 4. Materials & Resources 5. Indoor Environmental Quality 6. Innovation & Design Process LEED rating system
  40. 40. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Compact  Lightweight  Great for retrofits and new builds  Minimum Manpower  Minimal waste segregation  Fully automated - easy to operate  Low maintenance  High Performance  Treats a variety of combustible waste streams  Rapid start-up & shutdown (<10 minutes) Wastewater Technologies: Plasma Arc Waste Disposal System Green vivarium strategies Manufacturers: 1. PryoGenesis Inc.: www.pyrogenesis.com
  41. 41. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Plasma arc gasification is a waste treatment technology using high electrical energy and high temperature created by an electrical arc gasifier.  Arc breaks down waste primarily into elemental gas and solid waste (slag), in a device called a plasma converter.  Process is intended to be a net generator of electricity, depending upon composition input wastes, and to reduce the volumes of waste to being sent to landfill sites.  Dioxin emissions are possible from plasma arcs when chlorine is present.  Process gas cleanup is necessary when gasifying waste streams such as municipal waste streams known to contain heavy metals, chlorine/fluorine, sulfur, etc. Wastewater Technologies: Plasma Arc Waste Disposal System Green vivarium strategies
  42. 42. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Analyze cage processing thru-put to “right size” cage processing equipment.  Chilled water recirculation system on bulk autoclaves; chamber cool down  Use vacuum pumps, instead of aspirator fittings at cold-water faucets.  Low flow plumbing fixtures; toilets, urinals, showers  Low flow wash equipment; high pressure low flow spray nozzles Waste Efficiency: Reduce Water Usage Sustainable design approach
  43. 43. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Animal Caging Innovations: Innovive  Up to 168 cages per rack  Cages and bottles are Disposable / Recyclable – No washing required  Change-out every two weeks  Costs can be reduced by up to 46% Page 86 of 94 Green vivarium strategies Water Efficiency: Reduce Water Usage
  44. 44. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence 1. Sustainable Sites 2. Water Efficiency 3. Energy & Atmosphere  Prereq 1 - Building Commissioning  Prereq 2 - Minimum Energy Performance  Prereq 3 - CFC reduction  Credit 1 - Optimized Energy Performance  Credit 2 - Renewable Energy  Credit 3 - Best Practice Commissioning  Credit 4 - Elimination of HCFC’s / Halon  Credit 5 - Measurement and Verification  Credit 6 - Green Power 4. Materials & Resources 5. Indoor Environmental Quality 6. Innovation & Design Process LEED rating system
  45. 45. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Establish Project Criteria - Understand impact on sustainability  Question existing paradigms but understand implications  Space Type: Chemistry, Biological, Physical Science, Animal Care – Sets Baseline for Energy Use  Architectural Priorities  Ceiling Height: Impacts Air Changes - Energy  Floor to Floor: Lower requires smaller ducts & higher pressure drops – Energy  Engineering Priorities  Services Distribution Strategies Energy & Atmosphere: Project Programming Sustainable design approach
  46. 46. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Horizontal Distribution Vertical Distribution Interstitial Distribution MECH MECH VIVARIUM VIVARIUM MECH MECH VIVARIUM VIVARIUM MECH VIVARIUM VIVARIUM MECH MECH  LOW BUILDING HEIGHT  LARGE MECHANICAL ROOM %  MINIMAL SHAFTS  HIGH FLOOR PLATE EFFICIENCY • HIGH BUILDING HEIGHT • VERTICAL SHAFTS REQUIRED • LOW FLOOR PLATE EFFICIENCY • HIGHEST BUILDING HEIGHT • HIGH FLEXIBILITY • MAXIMUM BUILDING COST Page 67 of 94 Green vivarium strategies
  47. 47. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Codes & Standards  Know role of codes: Minimum Safety – IEQ  Animal Care Guidelines and Accreditation Standards: Know intent to develop sustainable alternatives  Outdoor Design Temperature/Humidity - IEQ  Indoor Design Temperature/Humidity - IEQ  Indoor Noise Criteria - IEQ  Indoor Lighting Levels - IEQ  ASHRAE 90.1-2001 = 1.4 w/SF (down from 2.3 w/sf) Energy & Atmosphere: Setting Green Goals Sustainable design approach
  48. 48. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Primary Containment - Energy  Fume Hoods: Conventional, VAV, High Performance - Identify operating sash height  Biosafety Cabinets: Recirculating, 30% Exhaust; 70% Exhaust, 100% Exhaust - Identify sash height  Glove Boxes (lowest flow requirement)  Ventilated Caging - Non-hazardous work (reduced room air flow)  Ventilated Containment Caging – Primary containment barrier (reduced room air flow)  Chemical Storage Cabinets  Non-vented flammable cabinets: NFPA 45 required  Vented cabinets - Less air flow than fume hood Energy & Atmosphere: Exhaust Requirements Sustainable design approach
  49. 49. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Airflow Ventilation Rates  Industry standard 10-15 air changes per hour  Minimum 15 air changes per hour for static or open caging  Ventilated racks allow room air flow to drop to 10 air changes per hour  Ventilated racks provide 40- 60 air changes per hour in individual cages Page 92 of 94 Green vivarium strategies
  50. 50. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Internal Equipment Loads - Energy  Benchmarking - Operating versus Design  Avoid Averaging - Design to Peak Space Load  Labs 21 - Typically over designed by 2 to 3 times  Variability - Operating Schedules  Diversity  Avoid Safety Factors – Not included in ASHRAE  Ventilation Rate: Avoid arbitrary air change rates/accepted standards - Energy  Code Issues  OSHA 1910-1450 - Supply air for normal ventilation and makeup only; not for protection from hazards. Energy & Atmosphere: Set Ventilation Criteria Sustainable design approach
  51. 51. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Manifold vs. Individual Fume Hood Fans - Energy  Hazardous vs. Non-Hazardous Code Definition: AIHA Position Paper & Z9.5 - Non-hazardous  Heat Recovery: If cross contamination possible, NFPA 45 only allows on non-laboratory or general room exhaust.  Allows diversity (Labs 21 suggests no diversity in sizing exhaust system for safety)  Redundancy  Flexibility  Stack Discharge Velocity 2500 fpm minimum. Control via staging or bypass. Energy & Atmosphere: Minimum Performance Sustainable design approach
  52. 52. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Establish Baseline Energy Model Per ASHRAE 90.1- Energy (Note: code is now more stringent - cannot apply old baselines)  Select fuel sources (Availability, Cost, Environmental Impact)  Identify ASHRAE defined Minimum system requirements  Enthalpy heat recovery required for systems > 5000 cfm & 70% outside air  VFDs required for fan systems > 25HP  Create Energy Model  Identify large energy users (chilled water plant, fans) – Targets greatest impact areas to maximize investment Energy & Atmosphere: Optimizing Performance Sustainable design approach
  53. 53. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Narrow the range for temperature and humidity control by designing for majority of the animal population housed.  Measure base usage of equipment electrical loads in a comparable animal facility and design electrical and cooling systems based on these measurements.  Provide check-metering for measurement and verification Green vivarium strategies Energy & Atmosphere: "Right-Size“ Equipment
  54. 54. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Environmental Requirements by Specie Temperature Humidity Lighting Small Animal Large Animal Page 91 of 94 basis of design Green vivarium strategies
  55. 55. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Consider VAV supply and exhaust.  Use energy (latent and sensible) recovery.  Minimize outside air to 1 cfm/sf or less.  Consider occupied/unoccupied control for non-animal holding spaces  Reduce outside airflow during unoccupied periods.  Encourage smaller HVAC zones < 1000 sf without 100% outside air control zones.  Extensive building automation and controls systems to optimize HVAC and lighting use Energy & Atmosphere: Energy Efficiency Green vivarium strategies
  56. 56. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence A i r f l o w Time 24 Hours 150+ Flow Controller Occ./Unocc. 1200+ 600 300 600 300 300 Supply Air 150 Make-up Air 1200 600 300 600 300 300 Hood Exhaust Sash Position Indicator or Thru-Wall Sensor Variable Volume Lab Control Occupied/Un-Occupied Control Green vivarium strategies
  57. 57. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Heat Recovery – Run-Around Coils & Heat Exchanger Run-Around Coil (Typical) Exhaust Fan Supply Fan Cooling Coil Filter (if needed) Reheat Coil Run-Around Pump Heat Exchanger Filter Preheat Coil Green vivarium strategies
  58. 58. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence 1. Fresh outdoor air (hot and humid) is passed through the wheel 2-3. Outdoor air is cooled, dehumidified then supplied to HVAC system 4. Exhaust air is pulled from the space (Cool and Dry) 5-6. Exhaust air is heated and humidified then sent outdoors Heat Recovery - Enthalpy Wheel How it Works? (cooling mode) Green vivarium strategies
  59. 59. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence 1. Sustainable Sites 2. Water Efficiency 3. Energy & Atmosphere 4. Materials & Resources  Prereq Collection of Recyclables  Credit 1 - Building reuse  Credit 2 - Construction Waste Management  Credit 3 - Resource Reuse  Credit 4 - Recycled Content  Credit 5 - Local / Regional Materials  Credit 6 - Rapidly Renewable Materials  Credit 7 - Certified Wood 5. Indoor Environmental Quality 6. Innovation & Design Process LEED rating system
  60. 60. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Life Cycle Assessment of Building Material Raw Material Are the raw materials non- toxic? Does the raw material come from a renewable source? Does the product or material come from a salvage source? Does the raw material come from a certified sustainable source? Does the product have recycled content (post- consumer and/or post-industrial? Production Process How much energy is used in manufacture? How much water is used in manufacture? How much solid, aqueous and gaseous waste is associated with manufacture? Is the manufacturing plant energy-efficient or does it use alternative or renewable energy sources? Does the manufacturing plant conserve or reuse water? Is manufacturing waste reused or recycled? Packaging & Shipping Is the product or material locally manufactured? Is minimal, reusable or recycled packaging used? Does the manufacturer use efficient shipping methods? Installation & Use How durable is the product? Is the product low maintenance? Does the product offgas VOC’s formaldehyde, or other potentially harmful chemical emissions, or contain mineral fibers Is the product installation hazardous for workers? Are non-toxic, low VOC adhesives, finishes, sealants and maintenance products available for the product? Resource & Recovery Is the product or material salvagable? Does the manufacturer provide a takeback option for the product? Is the product or material recyclable? Is the product or material biodegradable? Sustainable design approach
  61. 61. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Life cycle assessment Raw Material Source Production Process Packaging & Shipping Installation & Use Resource Recovery
  62. 62. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Sustainable building materials Indoor Air Quality  Carpet  Paints  Adhesives  Wall coverings
  63. 63. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Natural materials  Cork  Bamboo  Linoleum  Wool  Stone  Wood Sustainable building materials
  64. 64. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Recycled content  Carpet  Insulation  Ceramic Tile  Fabric  Concrete  Phenolic  Solid Surfacing  Rubber Flooring Sustainable building materials
  65. 65. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Bio-based products  Compressed straw partition panels  Strawboard (particle board)  Tile (wood-based) Sustainable building materials
  66. 66. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Less product  Aerated autoclaved concrete  Structural insulated panels  Stained concrete Sustainable Building Materials
  67. 67. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Develop system to maintain current information on chemical and hazardous material types, quantities, location, disposal/ use histories, and recycling protocols.  Develop a Green Chemistry action plan to reduce or eliminate the use or generation of hazardous substances from the application of chemical products used . Plan would limit quantities, reduce lab waste and provide cost benefit in terms of less space, energy and operation storage & waste holding need. Materials & Resources: Green Chemistry Green vivarium strategies
  68. 68. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence 1. Sustainable Sites 2. Water Efficiency 3. Energy and Atmosphere 4. Materials and Resources 5. Indoor Environmental Quality  Prereq 1 - Minimum IAQ performance  Prereq 2 – Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control  Credit 1 - CO2 Monitoring  Credit 2 - Increased Ventilation Effectiveness  Credit 3 - Construction IAQ Management Plan  Credit 4 - Low-emitting Materials  Credit 5 - Indoor Chemical / Pollution source control  Credit 6 - Controllability of systems  Credit 7 - Thermal Comfort  Credit 8 - Daylight and views 6. Innovation & Design Process LEED rating system
  69. 69. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Meet IAQ & safety per ANSI Z9.5 (etc.) minimums and supported by facility design  Provide notification systems on all doors leading from pressure-controlled vivarium spaces to outside to maintain safety and security.  Optimize indoor airflow using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) or physical modeling.  Design all vivarium alarm systems to be inherently self- identifying and fail-safe.  Use low emitting materials: low VOC paints, carpeting, and adhesives Green vivarium strategies IEQ: General Systems / Finishes
  70. 70. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Floors: Industry standards are Epoxy and MMA. N2 (Seamless Technologies) is an environmentally friendly alternative.  Walls: Epoxy paint, FRP, or high performance coatings. Green alternatives are solid surface or phenolic(Trespa) wall panels.  Ceilings: Epoxy paint on gypsum board or FRP.  Consider cleaning protocols, impact abuse, & chemical exposure in selecting finishes most appropriate for a given application. Page 94 of 94 IEQ: Architectural Systems / Finishes Green vivarium strategies
  71. 71. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence 1. Sustainable Sites 2. Water Efficiency 3. Energy and Atmosphere 4. Materials and Resources 5. Indoor Environmental Quality 6. Innovation & Design Process LEED rating system
  72. 72. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  State-of-art automated cage washing systems use less water, chemicals and energy by recycling water.  Eliminates manual labor associated with task  Minimizes repetitive motion injuries for animal care staff Green vivarium strategies Innovative Technologies: Robotic & Automated Cage Processing
  73. 73. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Costs 50% of equal steam sterilization equipment  Less service space  Can be built in place - no pressure vessel  No pit for roll though units; can be retrofitted into existing buildings  No steam, no cooling water or chilled water, no compressed air, no drain  Costs 1/8 of equal steam sterilization equipment to operate  Quieter  More environmentally friendly Manufacturers: 1. Lytzen A/S: www.lytzen.com 2. Gruenberg: www.thermalproductsolutions.com Page 34 of 94 Green vivarium strategies Innovative Technologies: Dry Heat Sterilization
  74. 74. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  75 minute cycle time vs 16 hours with Ethylene Oxide (EtO)  Nontoxic and non-carcinogenic residuals  Safe to use with moisture or heat sensitive instruments  Estimated $65,000/year in savings compared to EtO  Consumes less power than EtO sterilizers  Requires no water, drain, or venting  No regulatory paperwork as with EtO emissions. Manufacturers: 1. Steris: www.steris.com 2. Sterrad Sterilization Systems: www.sterrad.com Page 35 of 94 Green vivarium strategies Innovative Technologies: Hydrogen Peroxide Sterilization
  75. 75. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Case Study Emory University Whitehead Research Building
  76. 76. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Whitehead Biomedical Research Bldg  Construction Cost of $ 65M (yr 2000 $’s)  325,000 GSF of interdisciplinary biomedical laboratory space  Supports Biosafety Level 2 and 3 research activities  CM@Risk Construction Delivery Method  Completed $1.5 million under budget and 1 month ahead of schedule  First LEED certified building in US Southeast (Silver LEED 2.0 rating) – 35 credits
  77. 77. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Critical linkage for the School of Medicine research programs  Campus Plan’s Guiding Principle for a “walking campus”  Vehicular and Alternative Transportation Network within a Regional System Green Site Integration: Whitehead Biomedical Research Bldg
  78. 78. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Whitehead Biomedical Research Bldg
  79. 79. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Whitehead Biomedical Research Bldg
  80. 80. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Owner driven request to pursue LEED certification after construction started  No change in the project delivery schedule  Team / consensus building (buy-in) required early goal-setting, joint training and bi-monthly team meetings  Some Changes made in construction by Owner for LEED certification  Additional cost to project was 1.5% of total construction. To LEED or Not to LEED? Whitehead Biomedical Research Bldg
  81. 81. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Lab Utilities Closet  Adaptable Lab / Office Plan  Modular HVAC & Piping Design  Directional Airflow Layout and Design Whitehead Biomedical Research Bldg
  82. 82. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  LEED Credit 2 – Urban Redevelopment 61,700 SF per acre  Building located on a previously developed site  Increased local density without loss of green space  LEED 4.1 – Public Transportation  Served by Emory’s alternative transportation system  No net increase in car parking  Reduced local vehicle emissions Sustainable Sites Whitehead Biomedical Research Bldg
  83. 83. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence LEED 1.2 Water Efficient Landscaping  Local Plant Material – no grass  Storm water collected in cistern for irrigation  Air conditioning condensate returned to Central Plant cooling towers Water Efficiency Whitehead Biomedical Research Bldg
  84. 84. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Condensate Pipe Out Water Efficiency LEED 3.2: Water Use Reduction - 30%  32% reduction in potable water through enthalpy wheel reduction in humidification levels & cold room compressor Whitehead Biomedical Research Bldg
  85. 85. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence LEED 1.1: Optimize Energy 20%  Long East/West Axis to maximize day light potential  High Performance Glazing that reduces UV transmittance  Extensive Building Automation and Controls System to optimize HVAC and lighting use  Enthalpy Wheels for heat recovery that can reduce heating and cooling costs from 20% - 80% Energy & Atmosphere Whitehead Biomedical Research Bldg
  86. 86. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Day lighting sensors  Extensive lighting controls Energy & Atmosphere LEED 1.1 Optimize Energy 20% Whitehead Biomedical Research Bldg
  87. 87. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence LEED 4.2 – 50% Recycled Content:  Selected materials that contributed at no additional cost: • Steel • Flooring • Metal strapping in place of wood blocking • Trespa “Top-Lab” for lab work surfaces LEED 5.1 – Local/Regional Materials  EIFS cladding (local plant)  Block/concrete Materials and Resources Whitehead Biomedical Research Bldg
  88. 88. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Non-smoking Facility  LEED 4 – Low Emitting Materials: Low V.O.C. paint, carpet, adhesives  LEED 8.2 – Daylight and Views: 90% of regularly occupied spaces have windows Indoor Environmental Quality Whitehead Biomedical Research Bldg
  89. 89. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Innovation Credit LEED 1.1- Innovation in Design:  State-of-art automated cage - washing system uses less water, chemicals and energy by recycling water  Eliminate manual labor associated with task and minimizes repetitive motion injuries for animal care staff Whitehead Biomedical Research Bldg
  90. 90. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence  Find opportunities to consolidate, renovate & demonstrate.  Appoint a person for in-house education  Join the US Green Building Council & adopt LEED Rating System  Include understanding & approach to sustainable design as a selection criteria.  Redefine your design standards & processes  Publicize what you are doing and why.  Get started now! Suggested next steps
  91. 91. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence Questions and Discussion
  92. 92. October 8, 2007 VivariumCenterofExcellence How Green is Your Vivarium?

×