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Complete:
              •Task A
              •Task B
              •Task C
              •Task D




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20100309astd Techknowledge2010
20100309astd Techknowledge2010
20100309astd Techknowledge2010
20100309astd Techknowledge2010
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20100309astd Techknowledge2010

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  • This session, Learning Transfer G was very well designed and focused on the presenter’s “Six Disciplines of Breakthrough Learning.” The main point is very easy to understand; that in today’s workplace, we need to move the goal posts so the finish line of our process is centered in business outcomes and workplace results, not level 1- or level 2–types of evaluation (measuring reaction and learning). The session also included tools to apply the six disciplines.
  • The first discipline is to Define Business Outcomes. This process is where you define business, not learning outcomes for the participants. This discipline asks you to focus on what people will do and not just on what people will learn.Define outcomes on-the-job rather than end-of-class.Traditional learning objectives are not sufficient; they define what will be covered or learned, but not how it will be used to benefit the business. The latter is vital to secure management support and to establish, in advance, how success will be measured.To work on this step, we were asked to sort a series of written objectives into Business or Learning outcomes. For example, “The attendee will improve quality and reduce waste by applying the Six Sigma principles taught in this course to business processes.” is a Business objective, while “The attendee will know the elements of constructive feedback and be able to give timely and effective feedback.” is a Learning objective.The second exercise for this step was called “Outcomes Planning Wheel” and asked: What business purpose is being addressed? What business need is being met? If the program is a success, what will participants do better or differently? Who will be able to see and confirm these changes? What are the measures of success?
  • Tool introduced with this step included a survey on learner attitudes (and how to improve them if necessary), and we practiced writing an invitation to a training program. This is a very interesting way to change your communications to the learner so that the expectations are set correctly for the new goal of transfer and application of learning to produce real workplace performance improvement.
  • Step Three: Deliver for applicationTo improve results, participants must be able to make the connection between what they learn during instruction and how they can apply it to their daily work.Material is presented in ways that emphasize application to minimize the learning-doing gap, motivate participants by illustrating the benefits, and prepare them to put their learning to work.To achieve this goal, each topic must be firmly linked to business needs and realities. Examples and exercises need to be credible and relevant to the participants. Goal setting must be taken seriously. During the course, participants should be encouraged to stop and reflect on how they can use what they just learned to help them be more effective. They should be given adequate time and guidance to set strong goals for post-course learning transfer.
  • Step Four: Drive follow-throughIn this part, we learned a bit about how to drive follow through by offering the learner with ongoing, scalable, support services such as management dashboards, checklists, and self-reporting mechanisms (that we can create with our current toolset).Put in place systems and processes that drive follow-through, learning transfer, and application.Participants’ objectives for applying what they have learned must be treated like other business objectives. They must be tracked, measured, and recognized, not put in binders and forgotten.Periodically remind participants of their developmental obligations to keep learning transfer top of mind.Provide time to pause and reflect.Participants in programs with follow-through management put forth greater effort, have more discussions with their managers, and make greater progress than those in traditional programs where follow-through was left to individual initiative and chance.
  • In step five, Deploy Active Support, we saw research by Kirkpatrick which shows that providing accountability plus support to the learner has the highest level of business value created than by adopting either approach by itself. We discussed the impact that managers have on learning transfer and discussed how to get them more engaged.
  • The final discipline is Document Results. The idea is to take the line manager’s perspective and discover what you would want to know to justify a decision to continue to fund training. What would you like to see as evidence? Would you be able to distinguish between workplace outcomes, not just activity? Would you confuse reaction with results? How would you tell the story behind the numbers in a short, concise manner.To summarize, we plan to begin using the Outcomes Planning Wheel, do a better job in documenting program results, and achieving the goals that we set for ourselves.
  • Now let’s switch to another session I found useful, “What Every Manager must know about learning 2.0.” This presentation was made by Marc Rosenberg. The focus was on what we need to do in order to manage the change to learning 2.0, which he defines as figuring out “how we can ensure that everyone knows what they need to know exactly when and where they need to know it.” As you can see in the chart, our emerging role is has a much larger task ahead of us, namely managing online information for the purpose of supporting the person and the person’s performance.Dr. Rosenberg mentioned that the big challenge in this new environment is managing the growth of information, and that learning professionals are uniquely suited to performing this role.
  • The old paradigm is the “sage on the stage” where the instructor is the center of all knowledge, everyone learns the same way, and the classroom and the course are the preferred formats for learning. The new paradigm has active learners seeking knowledge from offline and online resources in many different ways, according to their needs and time frames. The essential element is that the information they need is available to them at the time of need.
  • Next, Rosenberg talked about the new influences on organizational learning, including the increased importance of evaluation and assessment. Regarding advances in technology, he mentioned that the technology is getting simpler to use, so simple even a CEO can do it. The technology is so simple that the business does not need us to run it. Regarding learning culture, “Bad cultures defeat good learning and training nearly every time.”One crucial aspect is integrating learning with the workplace—think of it as learning that follows you—one example of this is Spaced Education, which we are beginning to use to help narrow that gap between training event and on-the-job performance by having the learning follow the participant back to the workplace where we can continue teaching and learning afterwards.
  • The point Rosenberg made here was that learning is a much more complicated phenomenon than can ever be limited to a classroom. In organizational learning efforts, the confusion of learning and training is fatal. The goal know is to identify the informal ways of learning and their sources, and apply knowledge management principles to organize it.
  • The role of knowledge management is the creation, archiving and sharing of valued information, expertise and insight within and across communities of people and organizations with similar interests and needs, the goal of which is to build competitive advantage.
  • Current use of web 2.0 technology in OneWest Bank includes documents and presentations that are maintained and distributed through SharePoint.
  • Here are additional web 2.0 technologies that can be implemented for learning.Imagine the RGB or HLS call center using collaboration sessions to create detailed content, be able to index and categorize the content, then perform keyword searches for that content to find what they need when they need it. The results might come back in a recorded web conference or podcast, a document, or a wiki or blog.
  • The point to the changes that learning 2.0 will bring us is that we need to examine the work being done by employees, then determine how to overlay learning on top of workflow and workplace. Distilling down information into useable, ordered and categorized chunks will be key to learning 2.0.
  • Some of these changes and challenges we do not have direct ownership of, but in some areas we have some influence. For example, in Metrics, does the corporation care about Kirkpatrick’s level 2 evaluations? No it doesn’t. Metrics are decided by the business and client. We own evaluation, we set standards, we develop certification programs. In Learning 2.0, everything else (i.e. how to complete the program) is up to the learner. Another important point that Dr. Rosenberg made was that the training and development role should have a steering committee to avoid the “ivory tower” effect.
  • For awhile, it seemed like everything was going “e.” Corporations wereready to blow up the classrooms.Results were that:The wrong content was transitioned to e-learning.Learning suffered and costs skyrocketed.Lots of “shovelware.”So the new role for the classroom is to facilitate discovery, collaborate in teams, make multiple instructional methodologies available to the learner, and replace the sage on the stage with the guide on the side.
  • If we think of our task as helping people to gain fluency, we can see that our roles change as participants gain competencies. As novices, our primary strategy is in education and training, participants ask us “show me how.” To help gain basic competency, participants want us to “help me do it better.” As their experience grows, they ask us to “help me find what I need.” Finally, as they become experts, the participants tell us “I create my own learning.” (and maybe we can help meet their demands!)
  • Click the remote control to play the video.
  • One of the sessions Dave attended was titled How to Educate, Facilitate, and Motivate
  • Organizations are asking for more focus, accountability, and communication but it is challenging when we have more on our plates then ever before.
  • It is difficult to keep focused if there’s no clear focus, inconsistent sense of urgency, and selective accountability. As the illustration shows, we are driven by “the crisis of the moment.”
  • So how does Miranda resolve these issues? She has developed a message pad process to document and address issues that have been dumped on her. Here is how it works: she issued John a slip to take to Lisa in Human Resources to handle. The duplicate copy reminded her to follow up at three pm.
  • Then, Miranda hands Kirk a slip and tells him to see Dave in Engineering. Later that day, Miranda flips through her message pad and follows up with Kirk.
  • Miranda is in the bathroom stall and over hears two co-workers talk about an issue regarding the supply room.“I am going to let Miranda know about this” says the first woman“You shouldn’t. You’ll just get one of those stupid message slips! Go talk to Ryan and he can get you the parts you need” exclaims the second woman
  • So how does this make Miranda feel? At first she was hurt, but as she thought about it, she realized that the woman had “an accountability moment” where Miranda’s process help made the system accountable, and trained the individuals to go through the correct process to resolve the issue.
  • The main points of this session:Scorecards act like a thermometer to measure.Action plans act like thermostats to regulate processes.Focus on non-negotiable accountability by having a specific process to drive accountability throughout the organization.
  • This session discussed how to:Teach others how to use brain research to improve instructional design models, strategies, and best practices.Create ways for learners to get more actively involved in engaging contentApply more personalized design strategies to improve learning outcomes Create brain-based guidelines for game design, virtual environments, and other learning technology
  • As an example, the search feature has improved from library cardsto Google. With numerous learning styles, the common goal is to trigger the “ahhhaa” moment of learning-Learning Orientations:Transforming Learners (Innovators) “Mentor Me” These learners Rely on intrinsic resources to self-manage their environment independently—set long & short goals accordingly.Performing Learners (Implementers) “Coach Me”These learners Rely on intrinsic/extrinsic resources to semi-manage their environment collaboratively—set short, some long goals accordingly.Granularity= 1. Follows Principles, Manages & Probes or 2 Follows Thru on Procedures, Finds Fact, & Meets RequisitesConforming Learners (Sustainers) “Guide Me”These learners Rely on extrinsic resources to comfortably exist within their environment dependently—set short goals accordingly.Granularity= 1. Meets routine requirements 2. Avoids risks and complicity
  • Here are the Top Reasons for Dropping Out:Learner AbilityLearner ReadinessLack of CommitmentUnmet RequirementsNo Context/ ConnectionDistractions or ObstaclesNo involvement or RelationshipsUnmet Communication NeedsAttitudes and Behavior PatternsNo Time Management SkillsStress/ Anxiety/ Frustration
  • The presenter shared her Top Passion Strategies, which included:Always engage emotions. The best learning comes from concrete experiences stimulated by great emotions that influence how we allocate attention and ensure retention and recall.Detect what is meaningful, expected, understood, and valued; use relevant, concrete experiences to build on what exists in memory. Identify meaningful benefits : why should I care and pay attention.
  • The presenter shared links to resources such as learning orientation questionnaire, research site, studies, papers, etc.
  • 20100309astd Techknowledge2010

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    63. 63. Complete: •Task A •Task B •Task C •Task D She takes two steps Two more steps and Two serious issues Miranda has goals in thru the door and John Kirk says no work was need to get resolved mind before she enters is short $400.00 in OT. done last night right away, and work. “You need to fix this because the capacitor Miranda has only taken NOW!” malfunctioned. 4 steps thru the door. NEXT
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