Tru64 UNIX Transition Strategies for Progress Software
OpenEdge RDBMS & 4GL




Introduction.................................
Introduction
HP will be phasing out Tru64 UNIX® and the AlphaServer enterprise system line in favor of the HP
Integrity se...
The steps that are necessary to perform an OpenEdge transition to HP Integrity servers are
summarized as follows:
1. Devel...
Tru64 UNIX OpenEdge transition plan
Developing and documenting a plan is crucial to a successful transition. Planning can ...
Assess infrastructure stack and availability
Availability of Tru64 UNIX, HP-UX 11i, and OpenEdge versions will play a majo...
Table 2. OpenEdge version and OS support

    OpenEdge version       Status              Tru64 UNIX support              H...
• Operating systems (HP-UX 11i v2 or above)
• Operating system patches
• OpenEdge10.0B and above application suite
• Other...
Currently, OpenEdge 10.0B (or later) is required for HP Integrity server support. To minimize the
number of changes occurr...
Test runs can help you estimate the amount of downtime the above tasks require along with exposing
testing and tuning prob...
Progress user profiles/Home directories
Capture Progress user profile information from the current OpenEdge database serve...
You can monitor Tru64 UNIX performance metrics such as CPU, I/O, and memory with the Tru64
UNIX collect utility (for examp...
If you plan to use raw devices, kernel asynchronous I/O must be ENABLED. See your UNIX
documentation for more information ...
Table 3. Mapping of kernel parameters for Tru64 to HP-UX

                                                                ...
Test and tune
Test and tune your newly-created OpenEdge database server before moving it to production. It is
important to...
For more information
                           For additional information and assistance, contact:
                      ...
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  1. 1. Tru64 UNIX Transition Strategies for Progress Software OpenEdge RDBMS & 4GL Introduction......................................................................................................................................... 2 OpenEdge transition overview .............................................................................................................. 2 Tru64 UNIX OpenEdge transition plan ................................................................................................... 4 Review your business........................................................................................................................ 4 Assess infrastructure stack and availability .......................................................................................... 5 Identify transition components............................................................................................................ 6 Define technical requirements ............................................................................................................ 7 Define transition strategy................................................................................................................... 7 OpenEdge upgrade ............................................................................................................................. 9 OpenEdge transition implementation steps .......................................................................................... 9 Gather information & customizations .................................................................................................. 9 Install HP-UX 11i, patches, Progress OpenEdge, and third-party products ............................................. 11 Apply gathered information and customizations................................................................................. 12 Conduct post-transition steps............................................................................................................ 13 Test and tune ................................................................................................................................. 14 Move to production ........................................................................................................................ 14 For more information.......................................................................................................................... 15
  2. 2. Introduction HP will be phasing out Tru64 UNIX® and the AlphaServer enterprise system line in favor of the HP Integrity server line based on the Intel® Itanium® 2 processor architecture. Users of Progress OpenEdge on Tru64 UNIX systems should start planning now regarding when and how they should transition to the new platform. HP is investing significant resources to help you transition to the new HP Integrity servers easily and reliably. Because transitions are easier when the same version is available on both the original and target platforms, HP has partnered with Progress Software Corp (Progress) to ensure that the latest version of OpenEdge 10 for Tru64 UNIX is also available for the HP Integrity server family. You have time to plan and conduct your transition. HP will continue Tru64 UNIX operating system support through at least 2011. However, as more robust market-leading solutions become available, it will become increasingly compelling for you to consider higher performing, lower cost options, such as the HP Integrity servers. You may find the HP Transition Benefits Calculator useful in analyzing and evaluating your transition. Visit the following website to use the calculator and get additional information: http://www.hp.com/go/artvalue This technical document can assist you in planning and implementing your transition. It presents the transition strategy and details for moving the Progress OpenEdge RDBMS and 4GL development environment from the Tru64 UNIX platform to the HP Integrity server platform. This document draws upon Progress' documented platform migration methodologies with a focus on the Tru64 UNIX to HP Integrity server transition. OpenEdge transition overview A Progress OpenEdge transition involves several implementation steps, including gathering data, setting up the target HP Integrity database server, moving the original database, testing, tuning, and turning the target environment over to production. This document discusses these steps for moving Progress OpenEdge from Tru64 UNIX to HP-UX 11i. This document assumes: • Working knowledge of OpenEdge installation and database administration • Working knowledge of Tru64 UNIX and HP-UX system and network administration • Working knowledge of Tru64 UNIX, HP-UX, and OpenEdge performance tuning • Familiarity with project management methodologies Note: The information in this document pertains to versions of Progress OpenEdge up to and including Version 10B. Rev. 1.0 2
  3. 3. The steps that are necessary to perform an OpenEdge transition to HP Integrity servers are summarized as follows: 1. Develop a transition plan. 2. Perform an OpenEdge upgrade (if necessary). 3. Implement OpenEdge transition steps. In Figure 1, these steps are represented by shaded boxes. Implementation steps and other activities are represented by bulleted text items and are discussed in detail throughout this document. Figure 1. Overall OpenEdge transition steps • Review business situations • Define Tru64 UNIX transition Develop components transition plan • Define technical requirements • Define transition strategy • Check if current Do OpenEdge Progress version upgrade is supported on (if necessary) HP Integrity OpenEdge Transition Development • Gather information & customizations Tru64 UNIX Production environment Unload db • Define database moving method Disk storage • Install HP-UX 11i, patches, OpenEdge, other products • Apply information gathered and customizations • Move database from Tru64 UNIX Reload disk storage • Post-transition steps: • Test and tune HP Integrity • Move to production environment Rev. 1.0 3
  4. 4. Tru64 UNIX OpenEdge transition plan Developing and documenting a plan is crucial to a successful transition. Planning can help identify critical decisions that are needed before beginning the transition process. Some of the steps that are essential in developing a Tru64 UNIX OpenEdge transition plan are: • Review your business situation • Assess infrastructure stack and application availability • Identify transition components • Define technical requirements • Define transition strategy: – Transition process – Test plan and acceptance criteria – Allowable production downtime In addition, include general project plan activities such as: • Identify and schedule staff and equipment resources • Identify and schedule other resources that you may use for the transition • Prepare a contingency plan for unanticipated problems You should make the transition to HP Integrity servers as soon as it makes business sense to do so. This transition may involve an upgrade to the latest release of Progress OpenEdge. If the current version of OpenEdge in production meets current requirements, and there are no plans to perform an OpenEdge upgrade in the immediate future, HP recommends that you continue using Tru64 UNIX. If more capacity is required, consider purchasing or leasing new AlphaServer systems. See your HP account representative or Solution Architect for information and visit the Alpha RetainTrust website for general information: http://www.hp.com/go/alpha-retaintrust/ You may find the HP Transition Benefits Calculator useful in analyzing and evaluating your transition. Visit the following website to use the calculator and get additional information: http://www.hp.com/go/artvalue Ultimately, the decision of when to retire your AlphaServer systems is yours and the decision will be different for each business situation. As you evaluate your business situation, bear in mind that HP will support your AlphaServer systems needs for a long time to come. Review your business A transition to HP-UX 11i on HP Integrity servers should be conducted with due consideration for factors that drive your business, and for resulting demands on your IT environment. Consider the following elements: • Business needs may require you to implement additional OpenEdge modules, some of which may be offered only with OpenEdge 10B or above. • Business demands on your IT environment may currently or potentially exceed its capacity, driving a need for additional computer resources. • Server consolidation, to reduce cost while implementing the latest HP Adaptive Enterprise technology, may be combined with your transition. • End-of-life dates on older versions of OpenEdge, the operating system, or other infrastructure components may force the transition Rev. 1.0 4
  5. 5. Assess infrastructure stack and availability Availability of Tru64 UNIX, HP-UX 11i, and OpenEdge versions will play a major role in deciding when to start the transition. End-of-life dates and general availability dates create time windows during which transition opportunities present themselves. The following information about product roadmaps can help you with transition planning. However, since roadmaps can change, you should also check the links in the For more information section and contact your HP account representative or Solution Architect for up-to-date information Tru64 UNIX HP plans to deliver updates to its Tru64 UNIX operating system until at least 2006 with standard support at least until 2011. Information about the Tru64 UNIX roadmap can be found at: http://h30097.www3.hp.com/pdf/tru64_unix_roadmap_1104.pdf End-of-life dates for current Tru64 UNIX versions are listed in the following table. Only versions that have not already reached their end-of-life date are shown. Table 1. End-of-life dates for Tru64 UNIX versions Tru64 UNIX version End-of-life date V4.0F 06/30/07 V4.0G 06/30/07 V5.1A 06/30/07 V5.1B To be determined Since Tru64 UNIX end-of-life dates might change, you should check the following HP website for the latest information: http://www.hp.com/hps/os/os_pvs_amap.html/ HP-UX 11i HP-UX 11i v2 is supported on both the Intel Itanium (HP Integrity) and PA-RISC (HP 9000) architecture. Transition information can be found at: http://h30097.www3.hp.com/transition/ Progress OpenEdge The current version of OpenEdge, Version 10B, is supported on Tru64 UNIX, HP-UX 11i v1 (HP 9000), and HP-UX 11i v2 (HP Integrity and HP 9000) operating systems. The following table summarizes the support matrix for Progress OpenEdge on Tru64 UNIX and HP-UX 11i operating systems. Note that only Progress versions that have not been discontinued are listed. Likewise, only Tru64 UNIX and HP-UX versions that are still under standard support (at the time of this writing) are listed. For more information on the lifecycle of Progress OpenEdge, see http://www.progress.com/products/lifecycle/index.ssp Rev. 1.0 5
  6. 6. Table 2. OpenEdge version and OS support OpenEdge version Status Tru64 UNIX support HP-UX (HP 9000) HP-UX (HP Integrity) 4.0F 4.0G 5.1A 5.1B 11 11iv1 11iv2 11i v2 8.3E Mature X X X X X X V9.1E Functionally X X X X stable 10.0B Active X X X X For the latest information about availability and support, HP recommends that you check out the sources listed in For more information. Identify transition components Components in your current environment that need transitioning and/or upgrading must be determined, along with new components that must be introduced. Current transition components The current Tru64 UNIX components that you need to transition to HP Integrity servers are: • OpenEdge OpenEdge database, database configuration files, schema, and so on (see the Gather information & customizations section) • Operating system information Memory and disk configuration, system parameters, performance tuning parameters, and so on • Client applications (refer to any 4GL application that is associated with OpenEdge) • Additional products Other Progress or third-party products executing on the Tru64 UNIX server that need to be transitioned (for example, Progress WebSpeed, Data Servers, Progress Dynamics, and so on) • Technical skills Refer to Transitioning Technical Skills from Tru64 UNIX to HP-UX. This HP white paper is an evaluation for system administrators and value added resellers and is available at: http://h21007.www2.hp.com/dspp/files/unprotected/hpux/transition_techskilles_tru64_hpux.pdf New transition components The new hardware, software, and environmental components introduced with the transition are: • Itanium hardware and peripherals • Computer (amount of memory, disks, and CPUs) • External storage (SAN, RAID) • Network (routers, adapters, and switches) • Environment • Power requirements • Air conditioning • Computer room • Software Rev. 1.0 6
  7. 7. • Operating systems (HP-UX 11i v2 or above) • Operating system patches • OpenEdge10.0B and above application suite • Other HP Integrity server-supported products (Progress, HP, third-party) Many of the above topics are addressed in the Tru64 UNIX to HP-UX 11i transition modules (TMs) available at: http://www.hp.com/go/transition-modules The TMs discuss such issues as platform, custom code, and application migration. Define technical requirements The technical requirements for both hardware and software must be reviewed. Hardware requirements Environmental requirements for HP Integrity servers are available at: http://www.hp.com » Servers Moving data between Tru64 UNIX and HP Integrity servers often calls for an extremely fast network. The network between these computers must have sufficient bandwidth to accomplish the task as expeditiously as possible. External storage with equal or greater capacity than your current Tru64 UNIX external storage is required for the new system. Intermediate storage may also be needed for use during database migration. Additional storage or tape may be needed for backups. Software requirements Progress OpenEdge 10.0B operating system requirements can be found in the OpenEdge Getting Started: Installation and Configuration for UNIX manual; see For more information for the link to the Progress documentation website. OpenEdge 10.0B on Tru64 UNIX requires Tru64 V5.1B. OpenEdge on HP Integrity requires HP-UX 11i v2. Check Progress documentation for any new requirements for operating system patches and required Java JVM versions. Define transition strategy Your Tru64 UNIX transition plan should include a step-by-step transition process description, along with plans for in-process testing and acceptance testing the new environment. Moving the database itself will probably require the most time, imposing some planned production downtime. It is often a good idea to do some “practice runs” using a copy of your database in order to estimate what database downtime (the time it takes to dump the database) might be and also to document the steps. Advance planning and practicing the transition will help to ensure success on the actual transition. It will help to make sure you have planned well and to improve chances of success on the actual transition. Defining the transition process Defining the overall transition process, deciding whether to implement an OpenEdge upgrade, and selecting the method for moving the database are very important technical requirements. Rev. 1.0 7
  8. 8. Currently, OpenEdge 10.0B (or later) is required for HP Integrity server support. To minimize the number of changes occurring during the migration, HP recommends upgrading to OpenEdge 10.0B on Tru64 UNIX first and verifying that your database and applications are stable in the new environment. Once you have verified that everything is functioning correctly, the migration from Tru64 UNIX to HP-UX 11i on HP Integrity can proceed. The only method of cross-platform migration supported by Progress is a complete “dump & load” of the database schema and table data. The “dump & load” process stores the database schema and table data in a platform-neutral format that can be transferred between dissimilar platforms. Test plan and acceptance criteria The objective of a test plan is to prescribe tests that ensure that your production environment performs properly following the transition. You may want to check the performance of your target system and conduct scalability tests to ensure that it can grow along with your business. Make sure that the functionality of all your critical business processes are tested and ensure that any customizations that may have been implemented are also tested. It should also include a schedule for the staff that will implement the tests. The test plan should also cover the following important points: • Types of tests needed (for example, system, performance, data types, acceptance, and so on) • Methods of testing (manual or with scripts) • Αmount of workload and number of simulated users • Response times for certain transactions or queries Allowable production downtime and selecting a database moving method Downtime usually begins when you start your data transfer from your current production system to your target production system. In most cases, the database cannot be used during that time. With good planning and testing, you can reduce the amount of production downtime. Performing a “practice” migration using a snapshot of the database can help uncover unforeseen issues. It will also give you a better idea of exactly how much time it will take to perform the actual dump and then transfer it to the new host. That way, you can give your database users an accurate estimate of the amount of time the database will be unavailable during the real transition. Prototype: Testing and tuning Before turning your target system over to production, you will want to test and tune it. Testing and tuning the target database server can take some time. HP recommends that you set up a prototype target production system to conduct tests of your transition procedure and additional target system performance and scalability tests. This will give you an opportunity to select, correct, and refine your procedures while allowing your users to continue useful production work on the original system. Then, when you are ready, you can run through a well-exercised transition process quickly, verify it, and then release it for production use. You may want to consider some of the following prototype test operations: • Experiment with moving the database between the Tru64 UNIX and HP-UX 11i database servers, measuring the time required. • Test questionable data types (endian-aware, for example) or storage arrangements (see the Endianism considerations section). • Test the newly-created database (conduct validation and integrity checks). • Tune the newly-created database and target operating system. Rev. 1.0 8
  9. 9. Test runs can help you estimate the amount of downtime the above tasks require along with exposing testing and tuning problems you may have. OpenEdge upgrade If your Tru64 UNIX system is not currently running OpenEdge 10.0B, HP recommends performing an OpenEdge upgrade first before beginning the platform migration. This will minimize the number of simultaneous system changes and make it easier to pinpoint problem causes. However, despite HP's recommendation to minimize the number of simultaneous changes, it is possible to migrate from an older version of Progress OpenEdge on Tru64 UNIX to OpenEdge 10.0B on HP Integrity servers. In fact, the steps in doing so are very similar; you still have to perform a “dump & load” of the database. General information related to migrating Progress databases and applications can be found at: http://www.progress.com/progress/products/migration/index.htm OpenEdge transition implementation steps The chapter on “Dumping and Loading” in the OpenEdge Database Administration manual provides the details on the commands and techniques used to perform the migration tasks. HP recommends that you read this chapter before you start to migrate the database. Progress and HP manuals that can assist you throughout the transition for both OpenEdge 10.0B and HP-UX can be found on the following websites: • OpenEdge 10: http://www.progress.com/progress/products/documentation/index.ssp • HP-UX: http://www.docs.hp.com/ The steps that are necessary to perform an OpenEdge transition to HP Integrity servers are summarized as follows: 1. Gather information and customizations about your current Tru64 UNIX configuration. 2. Install HP-UX 11i v2, patches, RDBMS, and third-party products on new HP-UX servers. 3. Apply gathered information and customizations to new HP-UX servers. 4. Move the database from Tru64 UNIX. 5. Conduct post-transition steps: • Test and tune the newly-created environment. • Move the newly-created environment to production. Gather information & customizations It is advisable to have in hand certain information from your current Tru64 UNIX OpenEdge database server. This can assist in the transition process. The following are examples of the information you should collect: • Progress user profiles • Database configuration files • Database integrity checks • Database backups • Endianism considerations • Performance metrics Rev. 1.0 9
  10. 10. Progress user profiles/Home directories Capture Progress user profile information from the current OpenEdge database server. This can help in establishing user profiles on the new database server. To eliminate shell-related script problems, notice which shell you are currently using and use the same one on the target HP Integrity server if possible (or at least one with similar command syntax). For instance, if the user is using KSH on Tru64 UNIX, using KSH on HP Integrity as well will make the transition most transparent. OpenEdge environment variables are typically set up by sourcing $DLC/bin/proenv from the Progress users’ shell (where $DLC is the directory where OpenEdge was installed). The command env can display all Progress environmental variables that are in use. For example, to display and save environmental variables: $ env > env.out Database configuration files Transfer current OpenEdge database configuration files (*.st). To minimize the amount of changes you will need to make to these files when you are configuring your HP Integrity server, lay out the disk storage for the database storage areas, BI logs, and AI logs to mimic your Tru64 system as closely as possible. Mount the file systems using the same pathnames for the mount points of the file system if possible. Endianism considerations Endianism refers to the way in which data is stored and defines how bytes are addressed in multi-byte data types. Tru64 UNIX is least significant first (little-endian) while HP-UX 11i is most significant first (big-endian). A database that tries to interpret multi-byte binary data on a machine that is of a different endianism will have different results. Therefore, moving binary data from Tru64 UNIX to HP-UX 11i is not allowed unless the move is endian-neutral. The Progress Dump & Load utilities will transfer most database data in a platform-neutral format, taking care of any endian considerations. However, if binary data is stored in a platform-dependent format within the database (a Binary Large Object for example), the data may have to be converted manually using a custom data conversion utility. The Progress 4GL language itself can serve as a powerful tool for performing such conversions. There is no generalized utility that can convert such data because knowledge of the application-specific data stored in the database is required. You should check and thoroughly test any table containing these types of internal storage for endianism problems. The Tru64 UNIX to HP-UX 11i Porting Guide discusses endianism considerations between Tru64 UNIX and HP-UX from the point of view of a software developer and is available at: http://www.hp.com/go/tru64appmigration » Porting guide Performance metrics Consider collecting performance data on your source database system so that you can compare the data to the target system performance following the migration. This can help in troubleshooting problems later. Aspects of measuring OpenEdge performance are discussed in the “Managing Performance” chapter of the OpenEdge Database Administration manual. The promon utility is the OpenEdge command most frequently used to analyze and manage OpenEdge performance. You may want to obtain transaction or query response times for comparison before and after the migration. Important metrics to consider are Transactions Per Second, Average Response Time, and Checkpoint statistics such as time between checkpoints and number of buffer flushes at each checkpoint. The promon utility can be used to monitor these statistics on both the source and target machines. Rev. 1.0 10
  11. 11. You can monitor Tru64 UNIX performance metrics such as CPU, I/O, and memory with the Tru64 UNIX collect utility (for example collect –scdm). You can also use the syscheck utility to take a census of the operating system. On HP-UX, Glance is one of the most comprehensive performance monitoring utilities available and provides a wealth of information. One thing to bear in mind when comparing performance data: performance of a freshly dumped and reloaded database is going to be different (better) than that of a mature database whose content could be fragmented or badly organized from use. The performance of the target system should be considerably better than that of the source system if a “dump and reload” has not been performed on the source Tru64 UNIX system in a long time. Install HP-UX 11i, patches, Progress OpenEdge, and third-party products You can begin installing the software once the new HP Integrity server hardware has been set up in its proper environment. Review the OpenEdge Getting Started Guide and release notes before beginning the installation. A goal of configuring the system should be to match the database storage layout of the Tru64 UNIX source system as closely as possible to ease the migration. Allocate as much or more storage for database storage areas and logs on the new HP Integrity system as you have on the original Tru64 UNIX system. If possible, use the same mount point names for the file systems to minimize the amount of changes needed to the database definition files. Also, ensuring that your new HP Integrity server has at least as much physical RAM as the Tru64 UNIX system will ensure that the same number of database blocks can be buffered in memory. OpenEdge 10.0B for HP Integrity is also a 64-bit version of OpenEdge, which means it can buffer very large amounts of data in memory at once, speeding database buffer accesses by avoiding access to storage. Operating system and patches You must install the HP-UX 11i version that is certified with your target OpenEdge version (including patches). The minimum version levels for the operating system and OpenEdge for HP Integrity servers is HP-UX 11i v2 and Progress OpenEdge 10.0B. To find the HP-UX11i installation guides, go to: http://www.docs.hp.com To find the HP-UX 11i patches, go to: http://www.itrc.hp.com OpenEdge and other products Install OpenEdge 10.0B as described in the OpenEdge Installation and Configuration Guide for UNIX. You can use SAM or the useradd and groupadd command line utilities to create an OpenEdge user and group. Install other products that you use, intend to migrate, are currently residing on the Tru64 UNIX server, and are supported on HP Integrity servers. File systems and raw devices If you plan to use files greater than 2 GB, enable large file support. Check /etc/fstab/ or use a utility such as SAM (System Administration Manager) to see if you are currently using this option. The fsadm and fsadm_hfs man pages describe how to enable large file support. Since the Tru64 UNIX file system supports large files by default, HP recommends that you enable large file support to avoid surprises later. Rev. 1.0 11
  12. 12. If you plan to use raw devices, kernel asynchronous I/O must be ENABLED. See your UNIX documentation for more information about creating a raw device. Use the ls command to verify that you have two special devices available for each raw location. If the asynchronous driver is loaded properly, the command fuser –u /dev/async will show the processes. Apply gathered information and customizations You can now apply the information you collected from the Tru64 UNIX OpenEdge database server to the newly-created OpenEdge database server. Environmental variables Use the applicable contents of your Tru64 UNIX user profile and the output from the env command, with appropriate modifications as required (such as different paths or a different user shell). The proenv command/shell script will take care of adjusting for a different installation location of OpenEdge on HP-UX versus the original Tru64 system. Customize configuration files Modify the Tru64 UNIX OpenEdge configuration files which were saved (as described in the Gather information & customizations section) and restore them to the appropriate directories. You must edit these files to reflect target environment changes, such as directory paths. Adjust kernel parameters Refer to the OpenEdge Installation and Configuration Guide for recommendations on kernel parameter settings for shared memory and semaphore-related kernel configuration variables. In most cases, the HP-UX defaults are sufficient for a small to medium sized database. However, you should compare the kernel configuration settings from the Tru64 UNIX system and set the equivalent HP-UX kernel variable (if there is one) to a value that would yield similar behavior and/or performance. Table 3 compares a number of the more common kernel parameters between Tru64 UNIX and HP-UX. Database backup It is important to have a backup before beginning the migration. Right after bringing the database offline (using the proshut command), use the probkup command. Much more information on the topic is available in the “Backing Up a Database” chapter of the OpenEdge Database Administration manual. Database shutdown At this point, you should be ready to begin migrating the database. Shut down the database using the proshut command on the source Tru64 server. Database integrity checks The OpenEdge utilities will verify the integrity of database blocks as the database is being dumped and reloaded to make sure there are no fragmented linked lists. No additional integrity checking should be necessary. Move the database Use ftp, rcp, or some other bulk copy utility to transfer the database dump from the Tru64 UNIX machine to the HP Integrity server. Then, use a utility such as prostruct to create an empty database on the target HP Integrity server and import the schema and data using the “load” command in the OpenEdge Data Dictionary tool. You will also need to rebuild the database indexes. Once you are satisfied everything has been configured correctly, start the database using the mprosrv command. Rev. 1.0 12
  13. 13. Table 3. Mapping of kernel parameters for Tru64 to HP-UX Progress Parameter Tru64 UNIX name HP-UX name recommended purpose value Current value or system default + Maximum number (Total OpenEdge of shared memory shm_mni shmmni memory (SHM) identifiers requirement) /SHMMAX Maximum number of SHM segments shm_seg shmseg 4-8 a single process can attach System default; Maximum SHM increase if you shm_max shmmax segment size get OpenEdge error 1135 Number of semaphore (SEM) 1 per active IDs; each sem_mni semmni multi-user represents an database array of SEMs (Max-local-users- Maximum number on-any-database of semaphores per sem_msl semmsl + Max-#servers- SEM ID on-any-database + 4) (SEMMSL x Total semaphores sem_mni semmns #active- in the system databases) Number of Same value as semaphore undo sem_ume semume SEMMNS structures > = server size Maximum address per_proc_address_space, process + space for a single N/A max_per_proc_address_space SHMSEG * user (process) SHMMAX Conduct post-transition steps Perform the following recommended steps on the target OpenEdge database server after you have completed moving the Tru64 OpenEdge database: 1. Update indexes, evaluate triggers, and set constraints. 2. Verify the integrity of the OpenEdge database. 3. Check the database log for errors. 4. If possible, compare the original and new database table by table and row by row to see if the database is correct. 5. Perform a backup (using probkup) on the new HP Integrity system as a baseline for the database on that system. Rev. 1.0 13
  14. 14. Test and tune Test and tune your newly-created OpenEdge database server before moving it to production. It is important to determine that your critical business processes are working properly and that your Progress database server is delivering optimal performance. Test plan and acceptance criteria Test your new database server by executing the test plan you prepared (see the Test plan and acceptance criteria section under “Defining transition strategy”). Tune After testing, tune your new HP Integrity OpenEdge database server. The OpenEdge Database Administration Guide provides some guidelines. Release notes can also assist the tuning effort. HP-UX tuning documentation can be found on the HP-UX documentation website: http://www.docs.hp.com Both HP and Progress offer training classes that can assist you in tuning both HP-UX and OpenEdge. Training on OpenEdge is also offered by numerous third parties. Performance monitoring is necessary for tuning. Monitor memory, CPU, and I/O performance of your new configuration. Tune the system, application, and database as necessary. Use the statistics and transaction and query response times obtained earlier from the Tru64 UNIX OpenEdge database server to judge whether the target system performance is up to expectations. (See the Gather information & customizations section). The amount of memory, and CPU and I/O resources can create performance bottlenecks and degradation. Monitor resources with utilities like Glance, sar, vmstat, and iostat. Differences in disk layouts, memory, and kernel design between Tru64 UNIX and HP-UX can also affect performance. Both operating system configuration and database configuration parameters may need tuning. Use the transaction rate and response time data collected earlier to compare the performance of the new server to the old. Move to production When you have completed all tests and are satisfied with the performance, you can move your new HP Integrity OpenEdge database server to production. Rev. 1.0 14
  15. 15. For more information For additional information and assistance, contact: transition.modules@hp.com For more information about the Alpha RetainTrust program and other sources of support, go to: http://www.hp.com/go/alpha-retaintrust/ For technical and planning information about transition subjects, go to: http://www.hp.com/go/tru64transition/ http://www.hp.com/go/transition-modules/ For information regarding the Tru64 UNIX roadmap, go to: http://h30097.www3.hp.com/unix/downloads/tru64_unix_roadmap.ppt For Progress documentation, go to: http://www.progress.com/progress/products/documentation/index.ssp For HP-UX documentation, go to: http://docs.hp.com/en/oshpux11iv2.html For Tru64 UNIX documentation: http://h30097.www3.hp.com/docs/pub_page/doc_list.html For online email discussions with other Progress users, go to: Progress Email Group - http://www.peg.com/ © 2005 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein. Intel and Itanium are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and other countries and are used under license. UNIX is a trademark of The Open Group in the U.S. and/or other countries. 5982-9864EN, 04/2005

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