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February 24, 2004.doc

  1. 1. Curriculum and Academic Policy Council Minutes February 24, 2004 Members: Joan Bass; Chris Coleman; Diane Burns; Becky Gmeiner; Rhonda McLain; Antionette Miller; George Nakos; Adel Novin; and Kim Robinson. Non-members: Cathie Aust; Ginny Bass; Larry Booth; Richard Clendenning; Benita Moore; Bill Pasch; and Tammy Wilson. 1. Approved minutes of February 10 meeting. 2. From the Department of Humanities: Pasch explained proposed changes (see below). Robinson motioned, Coleman seconded, and committee approved changes. Approved as a first and second reading. In order to prevent any misperception that the General Education Core Curriculum contains an insufficient structure of prerequisites designed to enhance student progress beyond the first semester of that curriculum, the Department of Humanities proposes that a prerequisite of ENGL 1101 (C) be added to the following courses offered by the department as applicable to Area C.1 of the General Education Core: ENGL 2111 World Literature I – Pre-Modern ENGL 2112 World Literature II –Modern World ENGL 2130 American Literature PHIL 2201 Introduction to World Philosophy Additionally, even though not currently applicable to Area C.1, the following courses are sufficiently similar to those listed above to warrant adding the ENGL 1101 (C) prerequisite as well: ENGL 2121 British Literature I ENGL 2122 British Literature II It is further proposed that the catalog listing for all of the above courses add the recommendation (but not requirement) of ENGL 1102 (C). The above changes are recommended to take effect in the 2004-2005 catalog. Additional Notes and Clarifications While foreign language courses numbered 2001 and 2002 are also applicable to Area C, the prerequisite of ENGL 1101 (C) is not being requested for these courses, given the restrictive sequencing of prerequisites in the respective languages; furthermore, insufficiency of resources severely limits the number of foreign language courses available in any given semester, thus restricting access to particular courses in the sequence for students who need to “time” their completion of foreign language courses carefully in order to meet requirements for their degrees, either in Area C or in other areas. The addition of the ENGL 1101 (C) prerequisite would further and unnecessarily complicate this timing for students who need foreign language courses. To continue to enhance the opportunity for first-semester students at CCSU to build suitable full-time class schedules, no change is being proposed in the prerequisite structure for courses applicable to Area C.2 (e.g., ART 2301/2302, CMS 2100, MUSC 2101, THEA 1100, etc.). 3. CCSU Policy on Minors: Motion was made to accept the Format for Undergraduate Minor Proposal Form by McLain, seconded by Novin, and approved by committee (see form below). Clayton College & State University Format for Undergraduate Minor Proposal (Draft – 1/23/04) Date School/College Department
  2. 2. Name of Proposed Minor Related Major CIP Code Starting Date All minor proposals must include the following information: 1. Program Description and Objectives: The minor description, written in a one page abstract, is a summary of the proposed minor. It should include the objectives of the program; the needs the program would meet; and an explanation of how the program is to be delivered; and information related to curriculum, faculty, and enrollment. 2. Justification and need for the minor: Provide evidence that the program is desirable, including student demand, exceptional qualifications of the faculty, special facilities, etc. 3. Procedures used to develop the program: Describe the process by which the department developed the proposed minor. 4. Curriculum: List the entire course of study required and recommended to complete the program. a. Clearly differentiate which courses are existing and which are newly developed courses. b. Append course description for all new courses. c. When describing required or elective courses, list all course prerequisites. d. List student outcomes associated with this minor. 5. Administration Describe how the proposed minor will be administered within the structure of the institution. 6. Assessment Indicate the measures that will be taken to assess the effectiveness of the minor and the learning outcomes of students enrolled. Minors that are proposed for areas where Clayton College & State University does not have a major must also address the following: 1. Provide the following specific information related to the justification and need for the minor: a. Indicate the societal need for graduates prepared in this program. Describe the process used to reach these conclusions, the basis for estimating this need, and those factors that were considered in documenting the program need. b. Include reports of advisory committees and consultants, if available. c. List all public and private institutions in the state offering majors in the area of the proposed minor. 2. Inventory of faculty directly involved: For each faculty member, give the following data. a. Name, rank, academic discipline, institutions attended, degrees earned; b. Current workload for typical semester, including specific courses usually taught; explain how workload will be impacted with the addition of proposed program; c. Scholarship and publication record for past five years; d. Professional activity;
  3. 3. e. Expected responsibilities in this program; 3. Outstanding programs of this nature in other institutions: List three outstanding programs of this nature in the country, giving location name, and telephone number of official responsible for each program. Indicate features that make these programs stand out. When available, append descriptive literature of the outstanding program. Indicate what aspects of these outstanding programs, if any, will be included in your program. 4. Inventory of pertinent library resources: Indicate--in numbers of volumes and periodicals--available library resources (including basic reference, bibliographic, and monographic works as well as major journal and serial sets; include any on-line resources) which are pertinent to the proposed program. How do library resources compare to those at institutions listed in section 3? What additional library support must be added to support the proposed program, and what is the plan for acquiring this support? 4-7 From the School of Technology: Bass explained the proposed changes to the Paralegal Program. A motion to approve 4-7 as a package was made by Robinson, seconded by Novin to approve as a first and second reading. The committee approved changes. We propose to revise the Paralegal Certificate and the Paralegal Studies A.A.S. degree to build upon curriculum improvements that were implemented in last year’s catalog. These proposed changes will not alter the total number of credit hours required for completion of each program. Below are bullet points to summarize the proposed changes. Course Descriptions and Course Names • Implement two new elective courses, PARA 2103 “Advanced Civil Litigation” and PARA 2105 “Advanced Legal Research” (course approval pending CAPC approval). Both of these courses will build on the required PARA courses and will allow interested students to specialize their studies. Both classes emphasize skills that are much sought after in larger law firms which work in more sophisticated areas of the law. In addition, we have recently removed two electives. (PARA 2333 - Special Topics was deleted and PARA 1225 - Family Law was made a required course.) Thus, we need additional electives for our growing student population. Paralegal Studies A.A.S. Curriculum • Add PARA 2103 (Advanced Civil Litigation) and PARA 2105 (Advanced Legal Research) to the list of electives. Paralegal Certificate Curriculum • Add PARA 2103 (Advanced Civil Litigation) and PARA 2105 (Advanced Legal Research) to the list of electives. ********** New Course Proposal Format Part A – Basic Catalog Information 1. Prefix, number, and hours distribution: (Number subject to Registrar’s approval.) PARA 2103, 3/0/3 2. Title: Advanced Civil Litigation 3. Restrictions (if any): a. prerequisite(s): PARA 1101, 1103, 1105, and 1109
  4. 4. b. corequisite(s): none c. other restrictions: none d. other comments: none 4. Course description for catalog: This course will allow students to further develop the basic litigation skills acquired in PARA 1103. This course will allow a student to participate hands-on on the preparation necessary for trial. This course will also emphasize complex litigation and the role of the paralegal in managing the flow of information and documentation typically found in such cases. 5. Semester of Implementation: Fall 2004 Part B. Justification. 1. Where will the course fit in the curriculum and what students are likely to take it? This course will be an elective in the Paralegal Studies Program and will be available to students in both the Certificate and A.A.S. programs. Students with a keen interest in litigation and/or working with large law firms will be likely to take this class. 2. Why is the course needed at CCSU? With the growth of the Paralegal Studies program, there is a need for additional electives. This course will allow our students interested in Civil Litigation to study the subject in more detail. In particular, this course will emphasize litigation practices of large firms dealing with complex litigation. 3. What similar courses (models) at other institutions have helped guide this proposal? We looked at the Model Syllabi of the American Association for Paralegal Education (AAfPE) and the syllabus of a similar class offered at The National Center for Paralegal Training. 4. Why are the restrictions needed? (prerequisites, corequisites, etc.) In order to better understand complex litigation, a student needs a solid foundation in the basics of torts, contracts, legal ethics, litigation, business organizations and legal research. 5. What impact will the addition of this course have on other courses or other programs at CCSU? None. Part C. Course Content 1. What learning outcomes for the major (or Core) will the course address? This is a program specific course. It will address the needs a student will have upon employment with a large law firm and the complex litigation typical to such firms/ 2. Tentative course materials (textbooks, software, etc.) Text: Civil Litigation Vol. I and II, by Kathleen Fisher and The Manual for Complex Litigation, published by the U.S. Government Printing Office 3. Expected method(s) of delivery (on-campus, on-line, hybrid, etc.) On-campus. 4. Attach a tentative course outline (one page or less) Part D. Faculty, Facilities and Expenses 1. Will the course be taught by existing faculty with existing qualifications or will new faculty or new faculty development be needed? This class can be taught by existing faculty, however, to best ensure that the course can be taught on a regular basis, an additional adjunct faculty member with the requisite knowledge and skills will be recruited. 2. What impact will having faculty teach this course have on other courses? None. 3. What proportion of the sections of the course are expected to be taught by full-time and part-time faculty? It is expected that this course will be taught by part-time faculty. However, a full-time faculty member is qualified to teach the course and could do so if necessary. 4. What expenditures, if any, will be required beyond faculty salaries and routine clerical support? (e.g. new equipment, new facilities, new software, etc.) None. Part E. Enrollment 1. estimated number of sections per year: 2 (1 is Fall and 1 in Spring) 2. estimated average enrollment per section: 15 3. estimated total enrollment per year: 30
  5. 5. 4. estimated reduction in enrollment in other courses, if any, as a consequence of new course (explain): None. TENTATIVE COURSE OUTLINE FOR PARA 2103 – ADVANCED CIVIL LITIGATION I. Advanced Tort Law II. Advanced Discovery a. Planning discovery b. Informal discovery c. Discovery in Complex Litigation I. Preparation for Trial a. Pre-Trial Order b. Trial Notebook c. Demonstrative Evidence d. Subpoenas I. Trial a. Rules of Evidence and Admissibility b. Paralegal’s Role at Trial I. The Appellate Process II. Complex Litigation a. Differences from regular litigation b. Types of Complex Litigation c. Managing Information ********** New Course Proposal Format Part A – Basic Catalog Information 1. Prefix, number, and hours distribution: (Number subject to Registrar’s approval.) PARA 2105 3/0/3 2. Title: Advanced Legal Research 3. Restrictions (if any): a. prerequisite(s): PARA 1101, 1103, 1105, 1109 and 6 semester hours of ENGL b. corequisite(s): none c. other restrictions: none d. other comments: none 4. Course description for catalog: This hands-on course will allow students to use the skills acquired in PARA 1105 to prepare and review more sophisticated and complex legal documents. Students will gain additional expertise in electronic legal research. This course will require extensive out-of-class library and research time. 5. Semester of Implementation: Spring 2005 Part B. Justification 1. Where will the course fit in the curriculum and what students are likely to take it? This course will be an elective in the Paralegal Studies Program and will be available to students in both the Certificate and A.A.S. programs. Students with an interest in ultimately attending law school would be attracted to this class as would other Paralegal Studies students who wish to hone their research and writing skills.
  6. 6. 2. Why is the course needed at CCSU? With the growth of the Paralegal Studies program, there is a need for additional electives. This course will also be necessary should the Paralegal Studies program propose a Bachelor’s Degree option. 3. What similar courses (models) at other institutions have helped guide this proposal? We looked the Model Syllabi of the American Association for Paralegal Education (AAfPE). 4. Why are the restrictions needed? (prerequisites, corequisites, etc.) PARA 1101, 1103, 1105 and 1109 are necessary prerequisites because they provide the student the necessary foundation of the court system, litigation, commercial transactions and legal research needed to comprehend the concepts contained with complex legal documents. Six semester hours of ENG is necessary because students in this course will be required to prepare and comprehend documents containing sophisticated language and issues. 5. What impact will the addition of this course have on other courses or other programs at CCSU? None. Part C. Course Content 1. What learning outcomes for the major (or Core) will the course address? This is a program-specific course. It will address the legal and communication skills necessary to prepare and review sophisticated legal documents. 2. Tentative course materials (textbooks, software, etc.) Text: Legal Research and Writing for Paralegals, 3 ed. Edition, by Deborah Bouchoux 3. Expected method(s) of delivery (on-campus, on-line, hybrid, etc.) Class will be taught on campus. 4. Attach a tentative course outline (one page or less) Please see attached. Part D. Faculty, Facilities and Expenses 1. Will the course be taught by existing faculty with existing qualifications or will new faculty or new faculty development be needed? This course can be taught by existing faculty with existing qualifications. 2. What impact will having faculty teach this course have on other courses? None. 3. What proportion of the sections of the course are expected to be taught by full-time and part-time faculty? It is anticipated that the course will be taught by both full-time and part-time faculty, as scheduling needs dictate. 4. What expenditures, if any, will be required beyond faculty salaries and routine clerical support? (e.g. new equipment, new facilities, new software, etc.) None.
  7. 7. Part E. Enrollment 1. estimated number of sections per year: 2 (1 in Fall; 1 in Spring) 2. estimated average enrollment per section: 15 students (the class will have significant class participation and hands-on assignments) 3. estimated total enrollment per year: 30 4. estimated reduction in enrollment in other courses, if any, as a consequence of new course (explain): None. TENTATIVE COURSE OUTLINE FOR PARA 2105 – ADVANCED LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING I. Electronic Legal ResearchWestLaw a. Lexis/Nexis b. Legal research on the Internet I. Additional Secondary Sources a. Attorney General Opinions b. Form Books c. Uniform Laws d. Looseleaf Services e. Municipal Laws I. Legal Citation a. Blue Book vs. ALWD b. Advanced citation rules I. Legislative History and Administrative Law II. Legal Briefs a. Trial briefs b. Appellate briefs c. Proofreading and cite-checking ********** Proposed changes in course descriptions: Paralegal Studies (PARA) PARA 1101 - Introduction to Law and Ethics (3-0-3) This course provides an overview of the legal system, the role of paralegals within the system, and law office procedures. The course also focuses on critical thinking, communication skills, case analysis, the laws of contracts and torts, and ethical issues confronted by legal professionals. In addition, the course provides an overview of paralegal careers and employment techniques. Must exit from or be exempt from Learning Support Reading and English. Students who do not achieve a grade of C or higher (or K) in PARA 1101 must re-take PARA 1101 and achieve a grade of C or higher before a student may continue taking other PARA classes. PARA 1103 - Civil Litigation (3-0-3) This course focuses on drafting skills and the procedural rules and statutes governing state and federal civil courts. It is designed to take the student through all facets of a case: the initial client interview, the initiation of a case (or alternative dispute remedies), preparation of pleadings and discovery, motion practice, drafting of settlement and trial documents, and the appellate process. Prerequisite(s): PARA 1101. PARA 1105 - Legal Research and Writing (3-0-3) This course focuses on federal and state legal research utilizing law library books, on-line databases, the Internet, and CD-ROMs. Students will learn citation skills and draft memoranda based on case law and statutes. This course will require extensive out-of-class library time. Prerequisite(s): PARA 1101.
  8. 8. PARA 1107 - Criminal Litigation (3-0-3) This course focuses on the criminal justice system and related statutes and constitutional issues. Students learn procedural rules and become familiar with and draft pleadings filed in criminal court by prosecutors and defense attorneys. Prerequisite(s): PARA 1101. PARA 1109 - Business Organizations (3-0-3) This course teaches the law of business entities, including sole proprietorships partnerships, corporations, and limited liability companies. Student draft incorporation documents and use the internet to incorporate a business. Students also obtain a thorough understanding of contract law, including the elements of a contract, defenses and remedies. Emphasis is placed on practical considerations, especially drafting and interpreting contracts. Prerequisite(s): PARA 1101. PARA 1111 – Computers in the Law (3-0-3) This course introduces students to computer basics, hardware, and software. Students gain practical experience working with software applications, such as litigation support, spreadsheet, word processing, and databases. PARA 1113 - Real Estate Law (3-0-3) This course focuses on the buyer-seller relationship, title examinations and title insurance, document preparation, and filing procedures. Students prepare a closing statement and draft other documents needed to prepare for a real estate closing. Prerequisite(s): PARA 1101. PARA 1221 - Bankruptcy/Debtor-Creditor Relations (3-0-3) This course teaches students to learn about the documents filed in bankruptcy court by attorneys representing debtors and creditors in Chapter 7, 11 and 13 cases. In addition, the course will discuss collection remedies on judgments obtained in civil court by secured and unsecured creditors. Prerequisite(s): PARA 1101, PARA 1103, and PARA 1109. PARA 1223 - Wills, Trusts and Probate Law (3-0-3) This course teaches students the terminology and laws applicable to wills and trusts, and how to prepare these documents. Students also learn the procedural rules of Probate Court. Prerequisite(s): PARA 1101, PARA 1103, PARA 1105, and PARA 1109. PARA 1225 - Family Law (3-0-3) This course focuses on marriage, annulment, antenuptial agreements, divorce, and adoption. Students prepare all of the documentation necessary to file a divorce. Prerequisite(s): PARA 1101, PARA 1103, PARA 1105, and PARA 1109. PARA 1227 - Health Care Law (3-0-3) This course teaches students the legal issues involved in the health care industry. Students review and analyze contracts prepared by paralegals and attorneys for hospitals, doctors and Health Maintenance Organizations. Prerequisite(s): PARA 1101, PARA 1103, PARA 1105, and PARA 1109. PARA 1229 - Intellectual Property Law (3-0-3) This course takes a practice-oriented approach to the fields of patent, trademark, and copyright litigation and prosecution. Prerequisite(s): PARA 1101, PARA 1103, PARA 1105, and PARA 1109. PARA 1231 - Administrative Law (3-0-3) This course discusses how attorneys and paralegals interact before administrative agencies. The course includes a discussion of statutory law and administrative rules, in areas such as environmental and Social Security law. Prerequisite(s): PARA 1101, PARA 1103, PARA 1105, and PARA 1109. PARA 1233 - Employment Law (3-0-3) This course teaches federal and state employment law, discrimination and disability statutes, and practical issues and resolutions of these issues before administrative agencies. Prerequisite(s): PARA 1101, PARA 1103, PARA 1105, and PARA 1109. PARA 1235 - Current Law Office Issues (3-0-3) This on-line course will involve the student in practical problem solving and hands-on scenarios that occur in the law office, such as ethical issues, document preparation, legal software, and court filing procedures. Prerequisite(s): PARA 1101, PARA 1103, PARA 1105and PARA 1109. This course is open to AAS majors only. PARA 2103 – Advanced Civil Litigation (3-0-3) This course will allow students to further develop the basic litigation skills acquired in PARA 1103. This course will allow a student to participate hands-on in the preparation necessary for trial. This course will also emphasize complex
  9. 9. litigation and the role of the paralegal in managing the flow of information and documentation typically found in such cases. Prerequisite(s): PARA 1101, PARA 1103, PARA 1105 and PARA 1109 PARA 2105 – Advanced Legal Research (3-0-3) This hands-on course will allow students to use the skills acquired in PARA 1105 to prepare and review more sophisticated and complex legal documents. Students will gain additional expertise in electronic legal research. This course will require extensive out-of-class library and research time. Prerequisite(s): PARA 1101, PARA 1103, PARA 1105, PARA 1109 and six (6) semester hours of ENGL PARA 2222 - Occupational Internship (1-10-3) A minimum of 150 hours of on-the-job paralegal or other substantive law-related training in an approved work situation. Students work an average of 10-15 hours each week. Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least 75% of all Paralegal career courses and program approval. 8. School of Technology: A motion was made by Coleman, seconded by McLain, and approved by committee to change the block credit as below. The committee approved as a first and second reading. CAPC Request for Airway Science AAS Justification: Because students who have an FAA Airframe, FAA Powerplant, or FAA Airframe & Powerplant license are allowed course credit for this/these license(s), listing the courses as requested below will be more in line with and more reflective of current practice for these requests. No additional courses will be required to make this change nor will any curriculum be changed. Change Requested Listed in the catalog (03-04 p. 271) in the Aviation Maintenance Section of the Airway Science AAS, please change item B from AVMT 2000A Block Credit (32 hours) to AVMT 1101 2-0-2 AVMT 1102 3-0-3 AVMT 1103 4-6-4 AVMT 1104 4-6-5 AVMT 2201 4-6-4 AVMT 2202 4-6-5 AVMT 2203 4-6 5 AVMT 2204 4-6-4 AVMT 2205 4-6-5 AVMT 2211 4-6-4 AVMT 2212 4-6-4 AVMT 22133 4-6 5 AVMT 2214 4-6-5 AVMT 2215 4-6-5 Note: only 32 hours of AVMT credit will count toward the AAS in Airway Science. 9. School of Music: Wheeler explained the change, Robinson made motion, Novin seconded, and the committee approved as a first and second reading. Current name: Voice Literature I and II Proposed name: Art Song Literature I and II Justification:
  10. 10. Voice Literature may consist of song, oratorio, cantata, or opera literature; however, the published course description for MUSC 3711 and 3712 clearly specifies these courses as art song literature courses. Given the time constraints of one semester per course and in accordance with similar music programs across the country, it is appropriate to limit these courses to art song literature. The proposed title more accurately reflects the intended content of the course. 10. CIMS. Booth proposed changes to the CSCI 1301 and 1302 courses as per below. This has been in the works and both departments support. McLain motioned that the proposal be accepted, Robinson seconded, and the Committee approved as a first and second. Propose to make minor changes to the CSCI 1301 and 1302 courses. First we wish to remove references to specific programming languages. This will allow us to use an appropriate language without changing the catalog description. Second, we wish to reduce the hours for CSCI 1302 to 3 hours (currently it’s 4). This will better match our scheduling blocks and does not impact our ability to cover the material. This change will not affect our compliance with the USG’s adopted Area F in Computer Science. We have also reviewed the course descriptions and find they accurately represent the recently adopted USG’s outcomes for computer science programming in Area F. Existing: CSCI 1301 - Computer Science I (3-0-3) The course includes an overview of computers and programming: problem-solving and algorithm development; simple data types; arithmetic and logical operators; selection structures; repetition structures; text files; arrays (one-and two-dimensional); procedural abstraction and software design; modular programming (including subprograms or the equivalent). A high level programming language (currently C+ +) will be used. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1101 or higher (or equivalent placement score). Proposed: CSCI 1301 - Computer Science I (3-0-3) The course includes an overview of computers and programming: problem-solving and algorithm development; simple data types; arithmetic and logical operators; selection structures; repetition structures; text files; arrays (one-and two-dimensional); procedural abstraction and software design; modular programming (including subprograms or the equivalent). A high level programming language will be used. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1101 or higher (or equivalent placement score). Existing : CSCI 1302 - Computer Science II (4-0-4) The course includes an overview of abstract data types (ADTs); arrays (multi-dimensional) and records; sets and strings; binary files; searching and sorting; introductory algorithm analysis (including Big-O); recursion; pointers and linked lists; software engineering concepts; dynamic data structures (stacks, queues, trees). A high level programming language (currently C++) will be used. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1301. Proposed: CSCI 1302 - Computer Science II (3-0-3) The course includes an overview of abstract data types (ADTs); arrays (multi-dimensional) and records; sets and strings; binary files; searching and sorting; introductory algorithm analysis (including Big-O); recursion; pointers and linked lists; software engineering concepts; dynamic data structures (stacks, queues, trees). A high level programming language will be used. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1301.
  11. 11. 11. CIMS. Aust explained the proposed changes to IT program, Robinson motioned, McLain seconded, and the Committee approved the changes as per below as a first and second reading. The College of Information and Mathematical Sciences recommends the following changes requested by the Department of Information Technology. 1. Eliminate the Certificate of Information Technology (CIT) with the following timetable. Fall 2004 – last semester that students can declare themselves as CIT students. Spring 2006 – last semester that students can complete CIT requirements and be awarded the CIT. Rationale: When the degree proposal for the BIT was approved by the Board of Regents, the career ladder structure provided a needed mechanism to move students into IT positions quickly. The field of Information Technology has changed rapidly since 1998. As a result of these changes, the CIT is not a particularly useful credential for those seeking employment in the IT field. In addition, the requirement that all students interested in IT start at the certificate level forces students into a very structured curriculum. By removing the CIT, students will have the full range of AASIT courses open to them, subject to perquisites. Thus, students who are unable to complete some IT perquisites in their first semester and yet desire to be full-time students during their second semester will be able to take additional general education courses while completing IT prerequisites. This flexibility will benefit students. The retention of the AASIT is planned to serve the needs of those students seeking an initial IT credential before the bachelor’s degree Timetable issues: Elimination of the CIT will remove students from being able to enter IT with a HOPE grant. This is a major change that must be reflected in all publications and all recruitment activities. During the 2003-2004 year, information available to prospective students has shown the career ladder including the CIT. Thus, we must allow students to enter the CIT in the fall. Since so many of our IT students are non- traditional students taking less than 12 credit hours per semester, we need to allow 2 years for students to complete this one-year certificate. 2. Change from four separate majors in the BIT (General Information Technology – E-commerce emphasis, Database Administration, Information Technology and Security, and Software Development) to four concentrations within a single IT major. The names will remain the same, but structurally they will become concentrations. The major impact of the change will involve how students are coded and reported. Rationale: The original degree proposal for the BIT listed separate majors, but the particular majors in the list have changed since program inception. Although these options have been denoted as majors, and even have been given separate CIP codes, they actually function as concentrations. All BIT students take a common core of 28 hours of upper division IT courses and then 12 hours specific to the “major.” In most other majors at CCSU, a block or 12 hours within a degree program is structured as a concentration, emphasis, or track. The change to concentrations within a single major of Information Technology will provide a much more accurate reflection of the actual nature of the program and facilitate the continual curriculum change required for a program in this rapidly changing field. Finally, this structure will parallel that is the WebBSIT, which has a single major of Information Technology but provides for concentrations containing 9 semester hours. Note: The recently approved change to a major in Information Technology and Security will become a concentration in Information Technology and Security. 12-18. Technology: Bass explained changes and a motion was made by Robinson seconded by McLain, and approved by the committee as a first and second reading. Gmeiner reminded committee of the Action Form that is listed on the web for all changes/corrections that need to be made in Banner. **** We propose to revise the Computer Network Administrator certificate, the Computer Network Technician certificate, and the Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree in Computer Network Technology to reflect current networking technology and industry standards. The following bullet points summarize the proposed changes.
  12. 12. Outcomes and Program Requirements  Implement changes to both computer networking certificates and the AAS degree outcomes and requirements. These programs are changing to focus on core networking technologies and prepare students for important industry certifications. This is the first restructuring of the program to occur since its inception in the mid 1990’s.  Add CNET 2102, CNET 2109, CNET 2110, and CNET 2221 to the curriculum. These new required courses provide in-depth coverage of the latest networking technologies. Course Descriptions, Names, Hours, and Prerequisites  Change attributes of seven existing courses. The names of several classes and their descriptions have been changed to reflect their current content. Several classes are changing hours from 2-2-3 to 3-0-3 since the hands-on portion of the course is integrated with the lecture. Several classes have changes to prerequisites to reflect a new order in which classes will be taken. These courses include: o CNET 1101 (change of hours, prerequisites) o CNET 1102 (change of name) o CNET 1105 (change of prerequisite) o CNET 1109 (change of name, hours, description, prerequisite) o CNET 1110 (change of name, hours, description) o CNET 1120 (change of description) o CNET 2220 (change of description) Removal of Classes Remove CNET 1112 and CNET 2240 from the curriculum. These courses are electives that will no longer be needed in the restructured curriculum. ***** Programs in Computer networking TEC-211, 770- 961-3415 http://tech.clayton.edu/ Full-Time Faculty: Becsi , Clendenning, Coleman, Farr. The Computer Networking program offers two certificates that lead to the associate degree (A.A.S.). Computer Networking is about computers communicating with each other, from sending e-mail across the hall or downloading a file from halfway across the world. Students in Computer Networking programs will learn how to set up and manage a computer network, repair computers, back up data, and work with the latest hardware and operating systems. Students in this program will learn how to implement and manage Local Area Networks (LANs) and Wide Area Networks (WANs), troubleshoot and repair hardware and software problems, install and configure switches and routers, and administer both Windows and Linux systems. The program prepares students for certification in the following areas: Network+, A+, Cisco CCNA, Microsoft Windows Professional, Microsoft Windows Server, and Linux. Courses taken in the Computer Networking certificate programs also count toward an Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) in this field. Students in certificate programs in the School of Technology may be eligible for the HOPE Grant even if they have not recently graduated from high school. (High school GPA is not a factor for eligibility for the HOPE Grant.) More details are available from the Office of Financial Aid (770-961-3511). Details about the B.A.S. are available from the department head or dean. Computer Networking Program Outcomes The Computer Network Administration Certificate curriculum is designed to enable graduates to earn Network+ certification and to meet the following learning outcomes. • Explain basic computer networking principles, including the OSI and Internet models and the use of major networking protocols and media.
  13. 13. • Explain basic computer hardware and software concepts, work with the most prevalent operating systems, and produce formatted word processing documents and spreadsheets, and create and manage a simple PC-based database . • Install, configure and administer Windows Professional and Server operating systems, and implement and administer a Windows-based LAN. The Computer Network Technology Certificate curriculum is designed to enable graduates to meet the following learning outcomes (in addition to the skills learned in the Computer Networking Administration certificate program). • Install a Network Operating System (NOS) as well as set up and administer computer network. • Troubleshoot and correct PC and network hardware and software problems. • Explain routing principles and the operation of routing protocols, configure switches and routers, design and implement VLANs and WANs, and secure a network. • Install and administer, and secure a Linux system. • Perform advanced administration tasks with Windows Professional and Windows Server operating systems, including implementation of security features. The Computer Network Technology Certificate also prepares students to earn A+ certification, Cisco CCNA certification, Windows Professional and Windows Server certification, and Linux certification. The Computer Network Technology AAS Degree curriculum is designed to enable graduates to meet the following learning outcomes (in addition to the skills learned in the Computer Network Administration and Computer Network Technology certificate programs). learning outcomes listed for both the Computer Network Administrator certificate and the Computer Network Technician certificate. A student who has completed the requirements of these two certificates has completed the program-specific portion of the AAS degree and need only complete area A-E and other general requirements to earn the AAS degree in Computer Network Technology. • Design and implement VLANs and WANs • Explain routing protocols and configure routers • Explain Internet protocols as well as the fundamentals of basic network security. COMPUTER NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR Certificate (Leads to Computer Network Technician Certificate) Program Core (Applies to All Tracks) 15 hours ENGL 1101 English Composition I (3-0-3) MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling (3-0-3) (or higher) CNET 1102 Microcomputer Operating Systems Computer Concepts (3-0-3) CNET 1103 Microcomputer Applications (3-0-3) CNET 1105 Introduction to Networking (3-0-3) CNET 1120 Introduction to Internetworking (3-0-3) CNET 1109 Microsoft Windows Professional I (3-0-3) CNET 1110 Microsoft Windows Server I (3-0-3) Elective Courses (Choose three courses) To specialize in an area, it is recommended that a student choose all three electives from one of the tracks as shown; however, it is permissible to take three of the listed electives without specializing. Network Administrator Track 9 hours CNET 1120 Introduction to Internetworking (3-0-3) Choose one of the following pairs: a) CNET 1109 Network Administration (2-2-3) CNET 1110 Advanced Network Administration (2-2-3) or b) CNET 2230 Introduction to Linux (3-0-3) CNET 2330 Linux Installation and Administration (3-0-3) Web Specialist Track 9 hours INET 1150 Web Languages (3-0-3)
  14. 14. INET 1250 Web Programming (3-0-3) INET 2160 Internet Technologies (3-0-3) ________ Total 24 hours COMPUTER NETWORK TECHNICIAN Certificate (Leads to A.A.S. in Computer Network Technology) CNET 1101 Introduction to Microcomputer Repair (2-2-3) CNET 1102 Microcomputer Operating Systems (3-0-3) CNET 1103 Microcomputer Applications (3-0-3) CNET 1105 Introduction to Networking (3-0-3) CNET 1114 Network Servicing (3-0-3) CNET 1120 Introduction to Internetworking (3-0-3) ENGL 1101 English Composition I (3-0-3) MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling (3-0-3) (or higher) CNET 1101 Introduction to Microcomputer Repair (3-0-3) *CNET 2102 Operating System Technologies (3-0-3) *CNET 2109 Microsoft Windows Professional II (3-0-3) *CNET 2110 Microsoft Windows Server II (3-0-3) CNET 2220 Advanced Internetworking (3-0-3) *CNET 2221 WAN Design (3-0-3) Choose one of the following pairs: a) CNET 1109 Network Administration (2-2-3) CNET 1110 Advanced Network Administration (2-2-3) or CNET 2230 Introduction to Linux (3-0-3) CNET 2330 Linux Installation and Administration (3-0-3) _______ Total 30 hours * New courses to curriculum COMPUTER NETWORK TECHNOLOGY Associate of Applied Science Degree (A.A.S.) (Leads to B.A.S. in Technology Management) Essential Skills (Area A) 6 hours ENGL 1101 English Composition I (3-0-3)* MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling (or higher) (3-0-3) * A grade of C or higher (or K) is required in ENGL 1101. CRITICAL THINKING AND COMMUNICATIONS (Area B) 3 hours CRIT 1101 Critical Thinking across the Curriculum (3-0-3) NATURAL SCIENCE (Area D) 4 hours Take category A, B, C, or D: A. BIOL 1111 Introductory Biology I (3-0-3) BIOL 1111L Introductory Biology I Laboratory (0-2-1) (BIOL 1111 and 1111L are corequisite.) B. CHEM 1151 Survey of Chemistry I (3-0-3) CHEM 1151L Survey of Chemistry Laboratory (0-2-1) (CHEM 1151 and 1151L are corequisite.) C. PHYS 1111 Introductory Physics I (3-0-3) PHYS 1111L Introductory Physics I Laboratory (0-2-1) (PHYS 1111 and 1111L are corequisite, and MATH 1101 or higher is prerequisite.) D. SCI 1111 Integrated Science I (3-0-3) SCI 1111L Integrated Science I Laboratory (0-2-1) (SCI 1111 and 1111L are corequisite.)
  15. 15. Social Sciences (Area E) 6 hours E1. American Government POLS1101 American Government (3-0-3) E3. American History (Take ONE) HIST 2111 Survey of U.S. History to 1877 (3-0-3) HIST 2112 Survey of U.S. History since Reconstruction (3-0-3) PROGRAM COURSES 42 hours Computer Networking Core 30 hours CNET 1101 Introduction to Microcomputer Repair (2-2-3 3-0-3) CNET 1102 Microcomputer Operating Systems Computer Concepts (3-0-3) CNET 1103 Microcomputer Applications (3-0-3) CNET 1105 Introduction to Networking (3-0-3) CNET 1114 Network Servicing (3-0-3) CNET 1120 Introduction to Internetworking (3-0-3) CNET 1109 Microsoft Windows Professional I (3-0-3) CNET 1110 Microsoft Windows Server I (3-0-3) *CNET 2102 Operating System Technologies (3-0-3) *CNET 2109 Microsoft Windows Professional II (3-0-3) *CNET 2110 Microsoft Windows Server II (3-0-3) CNET 2220 Advanced Internetworking (3-0-3) *CNET 2221 WAN Design (3-0-3) INET 2160 Internet Technologies (3-0-3) Choose one of the following pairs: a) CNET 1109 Network Administration (2-2-3) CNET 1110 Advanced Network Administration (2-2-3) or CNET 2230 Introduction to Linux (3-0-3) CNET 2330 Linux Installation and Administration (3-0-3) Elective Courses (Select four of the following): 12 hours CNET 1109 Network Administration (2-2-3)* CNET 1110 Advanced Network Administration (2-2-3)* CNET 1112 Transmission Media: Installation and Maintenance (3-0-3) CNET 2222 Occupational Internship and/or Cooperative Educational Experience (1-10-3) CNET 2230 Introduction to Linux (3-0-3)* CNET 2235 Protocol Analysis (3-0-3) CNET 2240 Network Management (3-0-3) CNET 2330 Linux Installation and Administration (3-0-3)* CNET 2331 Linux Networking and Security (3-0-3) CNET 2333 Special Topics/Problems in Technology (Varies from 1-3 credit hours) INET 1150 Web Languages (3-0-3) INET 1250 Web Programming (3-0-3) INET 2165 Web Server Support (2-2-3) ITFN 1301 Foundations of Programming, Visual Basic (3-0-3) ITFN 1302 Foundations of Programming, Java (3-0-3) ITFN 1303 Foundations of Programming, C/C++ (3-0-3) ITSK 2311 Intermediate Programming, Visual Basic (3-0-3) ITSK 2312 Intermediate programming, Java (3-0-3) ITSK 2313 Intermediate Programming, C/C++ (3-0-3) _____ Total 61 hours * May be used as electives if not used to satisfy certificate requirements. * New courses to curriculum
  16. 16. **** COMPUTER NETWORKING (CNET) Note: Courses with the CNET prefix are career courses that do not normally apply toward the baccalaureate degree except as part of the career courses in the B.A.S. CNET 1101 - Introduction to Microcomputer Repair ( 3-0-3) An overview of the hardware of modern microcomputers, including motherboards, CPUs, I/O devices, peripherals, memory and storage devices. Maintenance, upgrading, and installation of hardware and software are covered. Electrical safety and correct work techniques are stressed. The course emphasizes concepts that covered on the CompTIA A+ Core Hardware exam. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1101 and CNET 1102. CNET 1102 - Computer Concepts (3-0-3) The basic concepts of microcomputer hardware and software are described. Students will become proficient in working with the most important microcomputer disk operating systems. CNET 1103 - Microcomputer Applications (3-0-3) A hands-on introduction to the productivity software found in most microcomputers; word processing, spreadsheets, database management, graphics and communication software. CNET 1105 - Introduction to Networking (3-0-3) This course provides an overview of computer networking. Topics include the standards, protocols, and topologies on which leading network systems are based. Ethernet and Token-ring LAN standards will be addressed in detail. Network troubleshooting, security, and analysis will also be introduced. Prerequisite(s): CNET 1102. CNET 1109 - Microsoft Windows Professional I (3-0-3) This is an introductory course in basic installation, configuration, and administration of a Microsoft Windows Professional system. Topics covered include setting up and managing user accounts, installing and configuring network protocols, securing resources with NTFS permissions, administering shared folders, and network printing. Prerequisite(s): CNET 1102 . CNET 1110 - Microsoft Windows Server I This is an introductory course in basic installation, configuration, and administration of a Microsoft Windows Server system. Topics covered include configuring the server environment, active directory and account management, configuring and managing resource access, network printing, and data storage. Prerequisite(s): CNET 1109. CNET 1114 - Network Servicing (3-0-3) A hands-on introduction to the hardware and software diagnostic tools and utilities used to troubleshoot and repair a computer network. An introduction to protocol analysis, network optimization techniques, and trouble-shooting tools are also included. Prerequisite(s): CNET 1107 or CNET 1120. CNET 1120 - Introduction to Internetworking (3-0-3) This course covers network devices, routed and routing protocols, TCP/IP fundamentals, IP addressing and subnetting, and WAN concepts. Students will receive hands-on practice configuring switches and routers. Prerequisite(s): CNET 1105. CNET 2220 - Advanced Internetworking (2-2-3) This course provides in-depth instruction in LAN switching, the spanning tree protocol, VLANs and trunking, distance- vector concepts, and link-state concepts. Students will use switches and routers to configure the spanning tree protocol, VTP, RIP, IGRP, EIGRP, and OSPF. Prerequisite(s): CNET 1120. CNET 2222 - Occupational Internship (1-10-3) Students secure paid employment in supervised and approved work situations to further their occupational skills, technical competence, and attitudes in an area related to their specialty. A minimum of 150 hours of work experience is required in an individualized training program. Requires program approval. CNET 2230 - Introduction to Linux (3-0-3) This course provides a basic background in the Linux operating system. Linux, a UNIX-compatible operating system for personal computers, is used to cover topics such as basic system operation and access, file system organization, file management and manipulation, shell scripts, and system maintenance and security. Prerequisites: CNET 1102 and CNET 1105. CNET 2235 - Protocol Analysis (3-0-3)
  17. 17. This course provides a comprehensive analysis of some of the common communication protocols used in large networks. Protocols addressed will include TCP/IP, SPX/IPX and NetBIOS. Primary focus will be on using tools such as Lanalyzer and Sniffer for problem analysis and network optimization. Prerequisite(s): CNET 1107 or CNET 1120. CNET 2330 - Linux Installation and Administration (3-0-3) This course provides the student with the essentials of installing, configuring, maintaining, administering, and troubleshooting the Linux Operating System. It also provides preparation for Exams 1 and 2 of the SAIR/GNU Linux Certification Administration Exams and the Linux Professional Institute Exams. Prerequisite(s): CNET 2230. CNET 2331 - Linux Networking and Security (3-0-3) This course provides a detailed explanation of Linux Networking and Security issues. It also provides preparation for Exams 3 and 4 of the SAIR/GNU Linux Certification Administration Exams and the Linux Professional Institute Exams. Prerequisite(s): CNET 2330. CNET 2333 - Selected Topics/ Problems - Tech (Varies from 1 to 3 credit hours) A study of selected topics or problems under the guidance and supervision of a faculty member. Requires approval of faculty member or advisor. **** New Course Proposal Format (new format draft 10-23-01) Dean should forward to AVPAA for review by CAPC Note: This form not required for each individual course that is included in the comprehensive proposal for a new program Part A – Basic Catalog Information 1. Prefix, number, and hours distribution: CNET 2102 3-0-3 (Number subject to Registrar’s approval.) 2. Title: Operating System Technologies 3. Restrictions (if any): a. prerequisite(s): MATH 1101, CNET 1110, CNET 1120 b. corequisite(s) (normal or absolute) c. other restrictions: e.g. major, junior standing, permission, etc. d. other comments: e.g. recommended sequencing, career course notice, etc. 4. Course description for catalog: Students will learn PC operating system fundamentals including command-line functions and utilities, boot sequences, file systems, installation procedures, and procedures for installing and configuring devices. Students will also learn to troubleshoot and fix common problems using diagnostic utilities, and to configure an operating system to connect to a network. This course is designed to teach the objectives of the A+ OS Technologies exam. 5. Semester of Implementation: Fall 2004 Part B. Justification. (OK to respond to each item individually or to combine all items into a blended narrative.) 1. Where will the course fit in the curriculum and what students are likely to take it? The course will be required for students earning the Computer Network Technician certificate or the AAS degree in Computer Network Technology. Students who have completed the Computer Network Administrator certificate and who want to continue on towards the Computer Network Technician certificate or the AAS degree will take this course. 2. Why is the course needed at CCSU?
  18. 18. The course is needed because networking students need more in-depth instruction in operating system technologies. One of the most widely recognized industry certifications for computer professionals is the A+ Computer Service Technician certification - in fact, it is explicitly required for many jobs and implicitly required for others. This course is designed with the objectives of the A+ Operating System Technologies exam in mind. The complementary course, CNET 2101 PC Hardware, is designed with the objectives of the A+ Core Hardware exam in mind. A+ certification requires passing scores on both exams, and thus with this course we offer students the instruction and hands-on practice needed to earn this important certification. Of course, the certification is important because it contains many foundational concepts and skills important to success as a computer technician, and that success is the ultimate goal of the course. 3. What similar courses (models) at other institutions have helped guide this proposal? The course will be similar to CIS 103 Operating Systems Concepts, offered at Gwinnett Technical College, Chattahoochee Technical College, and other technical colleges in Georgia. 4. Why are the restrictions needed? (prerequisites, corequisites, etc.) The prerequisite of MATH 1101 is needed because the problem-solving skills and some of the math skills that are developed in MATH 1101 will be needed in this course. The prerequisite of CNET 1110 is needed because it will be assumed that the student is already familiar with some operating system fundamentals that are covered in that course. The prerequisite of CNET 1120 is needed because it will be assumed that the student will be familiar with certain networking principles that are covered in that course. 5. What impact will the addition of this course have on other courses or other programs at CCSU? This required course will be replacing another course in the restructuring of the CNET curriculum. Thus the course is not an “additional” course - it is one of several key, integrated components of a restructuring that is seeing more courses being removed from the program than are being added to it. This restructuring is being done to update our curriculum, focus it on core networking technologies and align it with important industry certifications. There is no known impact on other programs at CCSU. Part C. Course Content (OK to respond to items 1-3 individually or to combine them into a blended narrative.) 1. What learning outcomes for the major (or Core) will the course address? The course will address the ability to explain basic computer concepts, work with the most prevalent operating systems, install a network operating system, and troubleshoot and correct common PC hardware and software problems. 2. Tentative course materials (textbooks, software, etc.) The textbook that is planned for the course is A+ Guide to Managing & Maintaining Your PC, Comprehensive, Fourth Edition, by Jean Andrews, ISBN: 0-619-18617-8 © 2003 3. Expected method(s) of delivery (on-campus, on-line, hybrid, etc.) The course will initially be taught on campus in a computer networking lab, but may adapt well to an on-line or hybrid format. 4. Attach a tentative course outline (one page or less) Part D. Faculty, Facilities and Expenses (OK to respond to each item or to combine the items into a blended narrative.) 1. Will the course be taught by existing faculty with existing qualifications or will new faculty or new faculty development be needed?
  19. 19. The course will be taught by existing faculty with existing qualifications. 2. What impact will having faculty teach this course have on other courses? This course is part of a program restructuring that reduces the total number of courses in the program, so it will not have the effect of creating additional load on faculty resources or affect other courses in any other way. 3. What proportion of the sections of the course are expected to be taught by full-time and part-time faculty? It is expected to be mostly taught by full-time faculty but may be taught by part-time faculty if the need arises. 4. What expenditures, if any, will be required beyond faculty salaries and routine clerical support? (e.g. new equipment, new facilities, new software, etc.) No new expenditures will be required - existing lab resources will be able to support the course. Part E. Enrollment 1. estimated number of sections per year: 3 2. estimated average enrollment per section: 20 3. estimated total enrollment per year: 60 4. estimated reduction in enrollment in other courses, if any, as a consequence of new course (explain): 0 This required course is a replacement for an existing course requirement, and thus will not result in a reduction in enrollment in other courses. **** New Course Proposal Format (new format draft 10-23-01) Dean should forward to AVPAA for review by CAPC Note: This form not required for each individual course that is included in the comprehensive proposal for a new program Part A – Basic Catalog Information 1. Prefix, number, and hours distribution: CNET 2110 3-0-3 (Number subject to Registrar’s approval.) 2. Title: Microsoft Windows Server II 3. Restrictions (if any): a. prerequisite(s): CNET 2109 b. corequisite(s) (normal or absolute) c. other restrictions: e.g. major, junior standing, permission, etc. d. other comments: e.g. recommended sequencing, career course notice, etc. 4. Course description for catalog: Students will use current Microsoft server technology to learn to create and manage user, group, and computer accounts, and to manage file and share permissions, hardware devices, disk storage, software and print services. The course will prepare students for Microsoft certification in the current Windows Server operating system. 5. Semester of Implementation: Fall 2004 Part B. Justification. (OK to respond to each item individually or to combine all items into a blended narrative.) 1. Where will the course fit in the curriculum and what students are likely to take it? The course will be the second of a two-part sequence that will be required for students earning the Computer Network Technician certificate or the AAS degree in Computer Network Technology. As such, students are
  20. 20. expected to take it immediately following the first of the two-part sequence, CNET 2109. 2. Why is the course needed at CCSU? The course is needed because networking students need more hands-on instruction in Windows technology than is currently offered. The course is designed to prepare students for Microsoft MCSA exam 70-290: Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment, which earns students MCP (Microsoft Certified Professional) status and is a step towards MCSE (Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer) certification. 3. What similar courses (models) at other institutions have helped guide this proposal? The course will be similar to CIS 2150 Implementing Microsoft Windows Server, offered at Gwinnett Technical College, Chattahoochee Technical College, and other technical colleges in Georgia. 4. Why are the restrictions needed? (prerequisites, corequisites, etc.) The prerequisite of CNET 2109 is needed because it contains concepts and provides students with skills that will be assumed when covering the material in CNET 2110. 5. What impact will the addition of this course have on other courses or other programs at CCSU? This required course will be replacing another course in the restructuring of the CNET curriculum. Thus the course is not an “additional” course - it is one of several key, integrated components of a restructuring that is seeing more courses being removed from the program than are being added to it. This restructuring is being done to update our curriculum, focus it on core networking technologies and align it with important industry certifications. There is no known impact on other programs at CCSU. Part C. Course Content (OK to respond to items 1-3 individually or to combine them into a blended narrative.) 1. What learning outcomes for the major (or Core) will the course address? The course will address the ability to install, configure, and administer a Network Operating System (NOS), and the implementation and administration of a local area network (LAN). 2. Tentative course materials (textbooks, software, etc.) The textbook that is planned for the course is Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment, Microsoft Press, ISBN 0-7356-1437-7. The textbook, which consists mainly of hands-on lessons, will be used with Windows Server 2003 software in a computer lab environment. 3. Expected method(s) of delivery (on-campus, on-line, hybrid, etc.) The course will initially be taught on campus in a computer networking lab, but it may be easily adapted to on-line or hybrid format. 4. Attach a tentative course outline (one page or less)
  21. 21. Part D. Faculty, Facilities and Expenses (OK to respond to each item or to combine the items into a blended narrative.) 1. Will the course be taught by existing faculty with existing qualifications or will new faculty or new faculty development be needed? The course will be taught by existing faculty with existing qualifications. 2. What impact will having faculty teach this course have on other courses? This course is part of a program restructuring that reduces the total number of courses in the program, so it will not have the effect of creating additional load on faculty resources or affect other courses in any other way. 3. What proportion of the sections of the course are expected to be taught by full-time and part-time faculty? It is expected to be mostly taught by full-time faculty but may be taught by part-time faculty if the need arises. 4. What expenditures, if any, will be required beyond faculty salaries and routine clerical support? (e.g. new equipment, new facilities, new software, etc.) No new expenditures will be required - existing lab resources will be able to support the course. Part E. Enrollment 1. estimated number of sections per year: 3 2. estimated average enrollment per section: 20 3. estimated total enrollment per year: 60 4. estimated reduction in enrollment in other courses, if any, as a consequence of new course (explain): 0 This required course is a replacement for an existing course requirement, and thus will not result in a reduction in enrollment in other courses. **** New Course Proposal Format (new format draft 10-23-01) Dean should forward to AVPAA for review by CAPC Note: This form not required for each individual course that is included in the comprehensive proposal for a new program Part A – Basic Catalog Information 1. Prefix, number, and hours distribution: CNET 2109 3-0-3 (Number subject to Registrar’s approval.) 2. Title: Microsoft Windows Professional II 3. Restrictions (if any): a. prerequisite(s): MATH 1101, CNET 1110 b. corequisite(s) (normal or absolute) c. other restrictions: e.g. major, junior standing, permission, etc. d. other comments: e.g. recommended sequencing, career course notice, etc. 4. Course description for catalog: Students will learn to install, configure, and administer a Microsoft Professional system. The course will include practice in configuring the desktop environment, installing and supporting hardware devices and drivers, administering and troubleshooting network resources, optimizing system performance, and implementing security
  22. 22. features. The course prepares students for Microsoft certification in the current Windows Professional operating system. 5. Semester of Implementation: Fall 2004 Part B. Justification. (OK to respond to each item individually or to combine all items into a blended narrative.) 1. Where will the course fit in the curriculum and what students are likely to take it? The course will be the first of a two-part sequence that will be required for students earning the Computer Network Technician certificate or the AAS degree in Computer Network Technology. Students who have completed the Computer Network Administrator certificate and who want to continue on will take this course in their first or second semester of enrollment in the Computer Network Technician certificate program. 2. Why is the course needed at CCSU? The course is needed because networking students need more hands-on instruction in Windows technology than is currently offered. The course is designed to prepare students for Microsoft MCSA exam 70-270: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Windows XP Professional, which earns students MCP (Microsoft Certified Professional) status and is a step towards MCSE (Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer) certification. 3. What similar courses (models) at other institutions have helped guide this proposal? The course will be similar to CIS 2149 Implementing Microsoft Windows Professional, offered at Gwinnett Technical College, Chattahoochee Technical College, and other technical colleges in Georgia. 4. Why are the restrictions needed? (prerequisites, corequisites, etc.) The prerequisite of MATH 1101 is needed because the problem-solving skills and some of the math skills that are developed in MATH 1101 will be needed in this course. The prerequisite of CNET 1110 is needed because it will be assumed that the student is already familiar with certain Windows networking and XP concepts that are taught in CNET 1110, such as Active Directory, DNS, DHCP, and others. 5. What impact will the addition of this course have on other courses or other programs at CCSU? This required course will be replacing another course in the restructuring of the CNET curriculum. Thus the course is not an “additional” course - it is one of several key, integrated components of a restructuring that is seeing more courses being removed from the program than are being added to it. This restructuring is being done to update our curriculum, focus it on core networking technologies and align it with important industry certifications. There is no known impact on other programs at CCSU. Part C. Course Content (OK to respond to items 1-3 individually or to combine them into a blended narrative.) 1. What learning outcomes for the major (or Core) will the course address? The course will address the ability to install, configure, and administer a Network Operating System (NOS), and the implementation and administration of a local area network (LAN). 2. Tentative course materials (textbooks, software, etc.) The textbook that is planned for the course is MCSE Training Kit: Microsoft Windows XP Professional (Exam 70-270), Microsoft Press, ISBN 0-7356-1429-6. The textbook, which consists mainly of hands-on lessons, will be used with Windows XP Professional software in a computer lab environment. 3. Expected method(s) of delivery (on-campus, on-line, hybrid, etc.)
  23. 23. The course will initially be taught on campus in a computer networking lab, but since the course is mostly hands- on and most any PC can be used for installation and administration of Windows XP Professional, in the future the course may do well if taught in a on-line or hybrid format. 4. Attach a tentative course outline (one page or less) Part D. Faculty, Facilities and Expenses (OK to respond to each item or to combine the items into a blended narrative.) 1. Will the course be taught by existing faculty with existing qualifications or will new faculty or new faculty development be needed? The course will be taught by existing faculty with existing qualifications. 2. What impact will having faculty teach this course have on other courses? This course is part of a program restructuring that reduces the total number of courses in the program, so it will not have the effect of creating additional load on faculty resources or affect other courses in any other way. 3. What proportion of the sections of the course are expected to be taught by full-time and part-time faculty? It is expected to be mostly taught by full-time faculty but may be taught by part-time faculty if the need arises. 4. What expenditures, if any, will be required beyond faculty salaries and routine clerical support? (e.g. new equipment, new facilities, new software, etc.) No new expenditures will be required - existing lab resources will be able to support the course. Part E. Enrollment 1. estimated number of sections per year: 3 2. estimated average enrollment per section: 20 3. estimated total enrollment per year: 60 4. estimated reduction in enrollment in other courses, if any, as a consequence of new course (explain): 0 This required course is a replacement for an existing course requirement, and thus will not result in a reduction in enrollment in other courses. **** New Course Proposal Format (new format draft 10-23-01) Dean should forward to AVPAA for review by CAPC Note: This form not required for each individual course that is included in the comprehensive proposal for a new program Part A – Basic Catalog Information 1. Prefix, number, and hours distribution: CNET 2221 3-0-3 (Number subject to Registrar’s approval.) 2. Title: WAN Design 3. Restrictions (if any): a. prerequisite(s): MATH 1101, CNET 2220 b. corequisite(s) (normal or absolute) c. other restrictions: e.g. major, junior standing, permission, etc. d. other comments: e.g. recommended sequencing, career course notice, etc. 4. Course description for catalog: In this hands-on course, students will learn a number of important technologies related to routers and will learn to configure routers to support those technologies. Topics include route summarization, VLSM, classless routing,
  24. 24. NAT, ICMP, PPP, ISDN, frame relay, and network security. This course is the concluding course in a series of courses leading to Cisco CCNA certification. 5. Semester of Implementation: Fall 2004 Part B. Justification. (OK to respond to each item individually or to combine all items into a blended narrative.) 1. Where will the course fit in the curriculum and what students are likely to take it? The course will be the second of a two-part sequence that will be required for students earning the Computer Network Technician certificate or the AAS degree in Computer Network Technology. Students who have completed the Computer Network Administrator certificate and who want to continue on will take this course following the first course in the sequence (CNET 2220). 2. Why is the course needed at CCSU? The course is needed because networking students need more hands-on instruction in Cisco technology than is currently offered. The course is designed to prepare students for Cisco CCNA certification, one of the leading networking certifications. 3. What similar courses (models) at other institutions have helped guide this proposal? The course will be similar to CIS 277 WAN Design, offered at Gwinnett Technical College, Chattahoochee Technical College, and other technical colleges in Georgia. 4. Why are the restrictions needed? (prerequisites, corequisites, etc.) The prerequisite of MATH 1101 is needed because the problem-solving skills and some of the math skills that are developed in MATH 1101 will be needed in this course. The prerequisite of CNET 2220 is needed because it will be assumed that the student is already familiar with certain Cisco LAN and WAN concepts that are taught in CNET 2220. 5. What impact will the addition of this course have on other courses or other programs at CCSU? This required course will be replacing another course in the restructuring of the CNET curriculum. Thus the course is not an “additional” course - it is one of several key, integrated components of a restructuring that is seeing more courses being removed from the program than are being added to it. This restructuring is being done to update our curriculum, focus it on core networking technologies and align it with important industry certifications. There is no known impact on other programs at CCSU. Part C. Course Content (OK to respond to items 1-3 individually or to combine them into a blended narrative.) 1. What learning outcomes for the major (or Core) will the course address? The course will address the ability to administer a computer network, troubleshoot and correct network problems, explain routing protocols and network security basics, and to configure routers. 2. Tentative course materials (textbooks, software, etc.) The textbook that is planned for the course is CCNA ICND Exam Certification Guide, Cisco Press, ISBN 1-58720-083-X. The textbook will be used with PCs, switches and routers in a computer lab environment and students will work through exercises that are in the textbook. 3. Expected method(s) of delivery (on-campus, on-line, hybrid, etc.)
  25. 25. The course will initially be taught on campus in a computer networking lab, but may adapt well to an on-line or hybrid format. 4. Attach a tentative course outline (one page or less) Part D. Faculty, Facilities and Expenses (OK to respond to each item or to combine the items into a blended narrative.) 1. Will the course be taught by existing faculty with existing qualifications or will new faculty or new faculty development be needed? The course will be taught by existing faculty with existing qualifications. 2. What impact will having faculty teach this course have on other courses? This course is part of a program restructuring that reduces the total number of courses in the program, so it will not have the effect of creating additional load on faculty resources or affect other courses in any other way. 3. What proportion of the sections of the course are expected to be taught by full-time and part-time faculty? It is expected to be mostly taught by full-time faculty but may be taught by part-time faculty if the need arises. 4. What expenditures, if any, will be required beyond faculty salaries and routine clerical support? (e.g. new equipment, new facilities, new software, etc.) No new expenditures will be required - existing lab resources will be able to support the course. Part E. Enrollment 1. estimated number of sections per year: 3 2. estimated average enrollment per section: 20 3. estimated total enrollment per year: 60 4. estimated reduction in enrollment in other courses, if any, as a consequence of new course (explain): 0 This required course is a replacement for an existing course requirement, and thus will not result in a reduction in enrollment in other courses. 19. Health Sciences: McLain explained the changes. A motion was made by Novin, seconded by Bass, and aprpoved by the committee as a first and second reading. The faculty of the Department of Nursing has reviewed and recommends five course prerequisite additions and one offering deletion. We recommend their approval to CAPC. Pre and Co-requisites recommendations: NURS 3101 – Professional Issues Prerequisites: Admission to nursing program a. Request admission to the RN to BSN completion program prior to enrolling in this first major course. b. Rationale: This course is the first major course for RN’s. Many RN students have completed the upper division nursing major courses prior to completing the core. Students need the foundation of core requirements prior to enrolling in the first major course. NURS 4100 – Nursing Research Prerequisites: MATH 1231 or HSCI 2201; NURS 3101 Co-requisites: NURS 3101 Request that statistics continues as the pre requisite. In addition, the first RN to BSN major course, Professional Issues (NURS 3101) must be taken prior to or concurrent with Nursing Research. a. Rationale: The foundational course is the framework for additional courses in the RN to BSN Completion Program.
  26. 26. NURS 4501 – Clinical Practicum for RNs Prerequisites: NURS 3101; NURS 3110; NURS 3201/3202 Request the first major course for RN’s (NURS 3101), the communication course (NURS 3110) and Health Assessment (NURS 3201/3202) be taken as foundational requirements prior to a clinical practicum. a. Rationale: The practicum is designed to build on existing clinical experience, broaden exposure to specialty areas and to apply theory learned in the BSN curriculum. Enrollment into the course prior to baccalaureate level theoretical offerings negate the intent of the practicum experience. NURS 4502 – Clinical Practicum for RNs Prerequisites: NURS 4501; NURS 4601 Co requisites: NURS 4601 a. Request the second practicum for RN to BSN students (4502) take place after or concurrently with Organization Transitions (NURS 4601). b. Rationale: The theory learned is intended to be applied during the final practicum experience. NURS 4601 – Organizational Transitions Prerequisites: NURS 3101; NURS 3310 and NURS 4100 for RNs Prerequisites: Generic NURS 3110; NURS 4100; 4301/4301L; NURS 4201/4201L a. Request that RN students complete the first major course (NURS 3101) and generic students are at the senior level prior to taking this course. b. Rationale: Course is designed to examine leadership and management theory as they apply in health care settings. Competencies in basic principles of nursing is required. NURS 4999/HSCI 4999 Informatics Practicum a. Request that this course be deleted from course offerings. b. Rationale: The certificate in Nursing/Health Care Informatics is no longer offered. (Students may still take HSCI/ NURS 4996, 4997 and 4998 as elective offerings).

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