CVR

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CVR

  1. 1. CVR Computerized Statewide Voter Registration System and Services Appendix H State Oracle Environment State of Maine Department of the Secretary of State May 28, 2004
  2. 2. BIS Oracle Environment RFP Addendum, FY2004 Table of Contents CVR...............................................................................................................................................1 ORACLE ENVIRONMENT SUMMARY..................................................................................4 OVERVIEW..................................................................................................................................6 1.1 INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................................6 1.2 GOAL........................................................................................................................................6 1.3 TECHNICAL OVERVIEW.................................................................................................................6 SCOPE...........................................................................................................................................6 1.4 IN SCOPE...................................................................................................................................6 1.4.1 General..........................................................................................................................6 1.4.2 Core Database Administration......................................................................................6 1.5 NOT IN SCOPE............................................................................................................................7 1.5.1 Application Database Administration............................................................................7 1.5.2 Hardware / Software Not Part of Environment..............................................................7 RESOURCES................................................................................................................................7 1.6 DATABASE AND APPLICATION ENVIRONMENTS.................................................................................7 1.6.1 Test and Production.......................................................................................................7 1.6.2 Others (Development, Training, etc.)............................................................................7 1.7 HARDWARE................................................................................................................................7 1.7.1 Storage Requirements....................................................................................................7 1.7.2 Memory Requirements...................................................................................................7 1.7.3 Maintenance Costs.........................................................................................................8 1.8 SOFTWARE..................................................................................................................................8 1.8.1 Oracle License Costs.....................................................................................................8 1.8.2 Other..............................................................................................................................8 1.9 OPERATIONAL SUPPORT................................................................................................................8 1.9.1 Staffing...........................................................................................................................8 1.10 APPLICATIONS REQUIRING ADDITIONAL RESOURCES.......................................................................8 BACKUP AND RECOVERY......................................................................................................8 1.11 OPERATIONAL BACKUP AND RECOVERY........................................................................................8 1.11.1 Backup Strategy...........................................................................................................8 1.11.2 Recovery Procedures...................................................................................................9 1.12 DISASTER RECOVERY / BUSINESS CONTINUITY..............................................................................9 1.12.1 Disaster Strategy.........................................................................................................9 1.12.2 Disaster Recovery Procedures.....................................................................................9 SERVICE LEVELS....................................................................................................................10 1.13 UPTIME..................................................................................................................................10 1.14 OUTAGES...............................................................................................................................10 1.14.1 Normal Maintenance Window...................................................................................10
  3. 3. 1.14.2 Scheduled...................................................................................................................10 1.14.3 Unscheduled..............................................................................................................10 1.15 METRICS TRACKING.................................................................................................................11 1.15.1 Purpose......................................................................................................................11 1.15.2 Data / Method............................................................................................................11 SERVER PERFORMANCE......................................................................................................11 1.16 COMMITMENT.........................................................................................................................11 1.16.1 Work with Customer to Ensure Acceptable Performance..........................................11 1.16.2 Hardware Upgrades..................................................................................................11 1.16.3 Acceptable Performance Unobtainable.....................................................................11 SUPPORT....................................................................................................................................11 1.17 CUSTOMER RELATIONS MANAGER.............................................................................................11 1.18 PROBLEM REPORTING...............................................................................................................12 1.18.1 Customer Support Center..........................................................................................12 1.19 ROLES...................................................................................................................................12 1.19.1 Server Administration................................................................................................12 1.19.2 Core Database Administration..................................................................................12 1.19.3 Application Database Administration........................................................................12 1.19.4 Application Development...........................................................................................12 1.20 PRODUCTS..............................................................................................................................12 1.20.1 Version Support Policy..............................................................................................12 1.20.2 Staying Current..........................................................................................................13 1.20.3 FY2004 Supported Product Matrix............................................................................13
  4. 4. Oracle Environment Summary BIS provides an Oracle Environment for Oracle database applications. Modeled after industry’s three-tier application model, it includes a database server, an application server, and a thin client. Both Intranet and Internet access is allowed. The goal is to provide high performance, availability and support to the State’s Oracle Applications, and to share the costs involved. With this service, BIS manages these items: o High Performance • The Database and Application Servers are built upon SPARC (RISC) processor technology, with a proven industry track record for high performing system. While all servers are sized to handle the anticipated peak loads driven by the applications, the servers all have multiple CPUs for speed and redundancy. Database servers, due to the intense workload, are configured with several CPUs. • The entire environment is attached to an EMC CX600 storage array in a SAN configuration. Each server is attached to the SAN with multiple fiber connections for speed and load balancing. • Gigabit network connections between the production application and database servers. • 64bit version of the Oracle Database Software is available for higher performance. • Oracle's Partitioning option is available to boost the performance of large databases. o High Availability / Support for 24x7 • The production database server, the core of the Oracle Environment, is a pair of Sun servers configured in a clustered, failover mode. If one server is unavailable due to maintenance of failure, the other takes over the load. • The production hardware in the Oracle Environment uses the latest SunFire technology, providing fully redundant components throughout. • Each server is connected to the SAN with multiple fiber connections for availability. All hardware in the SAN is fully redundant, and fully hot swappable. This includes disk drives, power supplies, power cables, storage processors, connections to the servers, etc. • Applications in the Oracle Environment are typically available for 24x7 availability, minus scheduled (and unscheduled outages.  Average uptime is 99.94% for all non-scheduled outage time, 99.76% overall.  Each application will typically experience another outage for upgrade purposes, bringing overall availability to roughly 99.70%. • BIS also provides operations and database administration staff around the clock, monitoring the status of the environment, correcting problems when they occur. • Databases are fully available for use, even during nightly full backups. o State of the Art Database Technology • The Oracle Environment uses Oracle Enterprise Edition software for the database and application server engines. This provides Maine with the most powerful engines Oracle has to offer. o Business Continuity / Disaster Recovery • Daily, all databases have a full, online, backup performed. Backups older than two business days are sent off site for BC / DR.
  5. 5. With this service, the rates cover: o All hardware purchase and maintenance costs o All software licensing and maintenance costs (Oracle, Sun, etc) o Server housing costs (power, backup generator, UPS, network connection, operational monitoring, etc.) o Customer Support Center for Problem Reporting o Operations / Unix Support Specialists o Database and Application Server Administrators (to provide core database administration functions to keep the applications operational) The rate structure was designed to fairly distribute charges among customers. This is accomplished by factoring in those items that contribute to the costs of the environment: storage, CPU / memory and licenses. The charges are calculated per database, and billed per application (an application will have multiple databases). There are four basic rates: • Basic Application and Database – All databases are charged using this rate; it’s based upon storage and concurrent sessions. • Slow Storage Usage (Special Case Use Only) – This is in place for large graphical repositories, allowing for large amounts of data to be stored in an Oracle database without incurring high costs. Because graphical data is used differently than normal Oracle storage, cheaper (but slower) storage has been purchased for this. The rest of the database must reside in the normal storage arena. • BC / DR Site for Non Oracle Environment Applications – With this rate, BIS will allow agencies to use the Oracle Environment as a hot site for their applications. Rates are based upon how often the applications are refreshed. This does not apply to Oracle Environment applications. • Application Server Usage Only – BIS will now support the other agencies database servers with their application server. The caveat is that BIS assumes that each agency has a properly licensed database server.
  6. 6. Overview 1.1 Introduction BIS is providing a fully encompassing Oracle environment for the applications it and other agencies develop. This is modeled after industry’s three-tier application model, with a database server, an application server, and a thin client. This environment, simply called the BIS Oracle Environment, is designed to provide high performance, availability and support for State Agencies that are building and running enterprise Oracle applications. 1.2 Goal The primary purpose for this Service Level Agreement is to outline the Oracle environment that BIS is providing for its customers, and to highlight the levels of service customers can expect for their investment. Also included will be a list of tools and versions that BIS will support for the coming fiscal year. 1.3 Technical Overview The environment consists of several Sun SPARC Unix servers: a production Oracle database server cluster, a test Oracle database server, a production application server, a test application server, and an internet application server. All servers share a common EMC disk farm. BIS only provides versions of products/tools that are supported by vendors (Oracle, Sun, etc.). A gigabit network interconnects most of the servers. Scope 1.4 In Scope 1.4.1 General The services and levels of service described in this Agreement pertain only to the specific architecture described as the “BIS Oracle Environment”. Specifically, this includes only the servers that make up the environment, the software that resides on these servers, and the network connecting them. 1.4.2 Core Database Administration Oracle database administration consists of two basic areas: core database administration and application database administration. The Core database is defined as the database devoid of any application specific components. Among other things, this consists of the Oracle data dictionary, the temporary tablespaces, and the rollback segments. BIS is responsible for these areas. Core database administration also consists of backup and recovery, disaster recovery, database version management, and the like. BIS is also responsible for these tasks.
  7. 7. 1.5 Not in Scope 1.5.1 Application Database Administration The Application database consist of those database objects specific to an application, including tables, indexes, referential integrity, triggers, views and the like. These items are what make up an application, and reside in a core database. As such, they are administered separately, either by the customer or by BIS. Always, they fall under a separate agreement. BIS is available to provide certified, trained resources in this area. Should customers desire to do their own DBA work, they must abide by the DBA standards provided by BIS, and agree to all points described in this agreement, particularly those that reference tuning and version control. 1.5.2 Hardware / Software Not Part of Environment Client computers, file/print servers, agency application servers, agency web servers, and the network between these computers and the Oracle Environment are NOT included as part of this agreement and its availability guarantees. Resources 1.6 Database and Application Environments 1.6.1 Test and Production Minimally, each application will have a test and production environment. Each environment consists of a database (either test or production). Should the customer desire, they can also take advantage of our application server to host their application programs. It is important to understand that BIS supports a standard set of development tools. Should a development tool be desired that is not supported, then the customer is responsible for providing their own application server. 1.6.2 Others (Development, Training, etc.) Environments other than test and production will be available at the customer’s request. All environments are billed at the same rate, defined in a later section. 1.7 Hardware 1.7.1 Storage Requirements As part of this agreement, BIS will ensure that storage is available for all of the databases and applications. 1.7.2 Memory Requirements Similar to storage requirements, BIS will also ensure adequate memory is available for the applications. In order to meet this commitment, BIS must require that customers
  8. 8. provide BIS with advanced notification (three months) when planning or enhancing applications that will have a significant impact on memory utilization. 1.7.3 Maintenance Costs BIS, as part of this agreement, will pay for all maintenance costs associated with maintaining the hardware (disks, memory, CPU, tape drives, network, etc). 1.8 Software 1.8.1 Oracle License Costs BIS, as part of this agreement, will pay for Oracle licensing, including: Oracle Enterprise Server (the database), the Partitioning Option, and the 9iAS (WebDB/Portal, Developer Server, and Oracle Application Server). This includes the initial license costs, plus Silver (24x7) support. 1.8.2 Other BIS, as part of this agreement, will pay for licensing the other tools in the development toolset. This includes the initial license costs, plus 24x7 support. 1.9 Operational Support 1.9.1 Staffing As part of this agreement, BIS will provide the staff necessary to monitor the Oracle environment on a 24x7 basis. BIS will also provide Unix Support Specialists, Oracle Database and Development specialists, and Network Specialists necessary to ensure smooth operations. 1.10 Applications Requiring Additional Resources In order to meet these resource commitments, BIS must require all requests for sizable (+25%) increases in concurrent sessions, memory or storage be made at least three months in advance. This gives BIS time to purchase extra licenses and hardware. In some cases, BIS may require a longer period of time. This would be in the case of a request putting us beyond the capacity of our devices. Backup and Recovery 1.11 Operational Backup and Recovery 1.11.1 Backup Strategy BIS’ current strategy is to take a backup of every OLTP database nightly. In most cases, these are hot backups, providing customers with 24x7 availability. DSS databases have a custom backup schedule, working around load schedules.
  9. 9. There is a five-week rotation of daily tapes, Saturday through Thursday. Friday night backups are kept in a twenty-six-week rotation. 1.11.2 Recovery Procedures Unless otherwise noted, databases are running in archivelog mode, which gives BIS the ability to perform point-in-time recoveries, should they be needed. It also allows for partial database recoveries (restoring a missing or corrupt file). Those databases not in archivelog mode can only be restored to the last backup. Operational recovery time varies based upon database size, but is typically one to four hours. Special cases, such as recovering parts of a database to a point in time in the past usually take longer. 1.11.2.1 Common Recovery Scenarios The costs associated with recovering databases are on a time and materials basis, unless otherwise covered by a Service Level Agreement. The time to restore varies, depending upon the size of the database. Common failures include: • Hardware failures - The customer will be notified, and an appropriate recovery window will be determined. • Data Integrity / Corrupt database - The customer will be notified, and an appropriate recovery window will be determined. • Data Integrity / Erroneous program or end-user - BIS will be notified by the customer, and an appropriate solution will be determined that will involve database recovery or application programming to correct. As a result, recommendations will be made on how to prevent this from happening again. 1.12 Disaster Recovery / Business Continuity 1.12.1 Disaster Strategy BIS’ current strategy is to send all tapes older than two business days off-site. Over the next year, BIS will be looking to improve this scenario. Phase One includes implementing a backup facility that allows for complete duplication of tapes: one for onsite and the other for offsite. Phase Two will research a complete hot-site, with standby databases. 1.12.2 Disaster Recovery Procedures There are different types of disaster. 1.12.2.1 Server Outage The more probable disaster is the failure of a production server. In this case, the test servers would be used to accommodate the critical production applications until the server was brought back online. Each application must be designated as critical or non- critical. Critical applications will be made available on the development server, non- critical applications will be brought up as resources permit or when the production server is available again. 1.12.2.2 Loss of Server Room The least likely scenario is the complete loss of the Server Room, which constitutes a failure of the Oracle Environment. Should this happen, a server will be brought up at a
  10. 10. remote site, and restoration will take place from the most current tapes available. Worst case, two days of information could be lost (assuming the tapes are in good shape), and time to recover is estimated at one to four weeks. Service Levels 1.13 Uptime BIS will guarantee an uptime of 99% over the course of a fiscal year, excluding scheduled downtime; only unplanned outages impact the availability. 1.14 Outages All outages will be announced via the sanctioned change communication mechanism of BIS, currently the Customer Support Center and the Changes Notes. 1.14.1 Normal Maintenance Window Server downtime will be normally scheduled during the Sunday morning timeframe. This is consistent with other hosted environments, such as the IBM and Bull Enterprise Servers. 1.14.2 Scheduled BIS will make every effort to ensure the availability of the system, especially where many applications require 24x7 operations. However, because maintenance must occur periodically, downtime will occur. The following policy is in effect for planned outages. 1.14.2.1 Servers Because servers affect all applications, the impact is high, and scheduling is difficult. Any normal maintenance will be scheduled during the normal maintenance window. 1.14.2.2 Applications / Databases Applications and their databases are more localized, typically to a department or agency. Because of this, scheduling is more flexible, and outages will be planned to accommodate the customer and BIS. 1.14.3 Unscheduled Should any unplanned outages occur, the time the database(s) are down will be counted against the metric of 99% availability. Unplanned outages include: o Database crashes – only the affected database will have downtime. o Server crashes – usually, all databases will experience some downtime. If downtime for the server is extended, BIS will migrate the database to another server, and bring it online again. The use of Oracle Names is critical to making this seamless and transparent.
  11. 11. 1.15 Metrics Tracking 1.15.1 Purpose Metrics are required to provide a mechanism for ensuring that BIS is providing the agreed upon support and availability. 1.15.2 Data / Method For each application database, the Customer and the BIS Customer Support Center will maintain metrics on availability. A complete list of application databases will be kept by the BIS Database Group, and distributed to the BIS Customer Support Center. BIS and the Customer will periodically meet to review the metrics, ensuring both parties are holding to their part of the agreement. Server Performance 1.16 Commitment 1.16.1 Work with Customer to Ensure Acceptable Performance BIS agrees to work with the customer in good faith to resolve performance problems with any application database. The outcome of any such analysis may result in recommendations to tune the Core Database, the Application (and its database), or both. Once the recommendations have been made, all parties agree to make the necessary changes in their areas of responsibility. 1.16.2 Hardware Upgrades Occasionally, tuning efforts may require that BIS upgrade the hardware to support the application. Where feasible, BIS agrees to do so under the existing rate structure. 1.16.3 Acceptable Performance Unobtainable Should acceptable performance be unobtainable either through normal tuning efforts, or with nominal hardware upgrades, the customer may decide to migrate their application to another platform not part of the BIS Oracle Environment. Should this rare occasion happen, BIS agrees to work with the customer to migrate the application to its new environment. Any work performed in this area will be charged at the current rates. Support 1.17 Customer Relations Manager All customers of BIS are entitled to use the Customer Relations Manager to resolve any issues they may have with BIS. BIS provides this service as a way for customers to ensure they are receiving satisfactory service, as this facility reports to the Deputy Director of the organization.
  12. 12. 1.18 Problem Reporting 1.18.1 Customer Support Center The Department of Administrative and Financial Services and BIS are making an extraordinary effort to provide a skilled first level of support through the BIS Customer Support Center. All problems are to be reported via this mechanism, especially outages for the databases. The performance metrics of this agreement will be tracked by the BIS Customer Support Center. Callbacks are based on priorities established at the time the Customer Support Center takes the call: 1) System Down – Callback within one hour. 2) Serious Business Impact (parts of system are unavailable or working incorrectly) – Callback within two hours. 3) General Question – Callback within one business day. 4) Service Request – Callback within one business day. 1.19 Roles 1.19.1 Server Administration BIS (Production Services) will maintain the servers that make up the Oracle Environment. 1.19.2 Core Database Administration BIS (Database Group) is responsible for maintaining the Core Oracle Databases that house the Application Databases. 1.19.3 Application Database Administration BIS and the customer will come to an agreement as to which party will maintain the application database. If the customer does not have the resources, then BIS will perform this function. 1.19.4 Application Development BIS and the customer will come to an agreement as to which party will develop and maintain the application source and executables. If the customer does not have the resources, then BIS will perform this function. 1.20 Products 1.20.1 Version Support Policy BIS has a strict version control policy within the Oracle environment. The goal is to ensure all applications are running current, fully supported versions of Oracle and Third Party tools. This policy is designed to protect applications from being hampered by issues and costs related to upgrading and supporting outdated product sets that are no longer supported by their vendors. Where multiple applications are running in the
  13. 13. environment, it is imperative they don’t impact each other. The potential for problems is minimized when only current, fully supported versions are used in the Oracle environment. 1.20.2 Staying Current BIS requires that all applications adhere to these rules of the Oracle Environment: o All applications must use tools listed in the Supported Product Matrix. o If a new tool is required, a request must come to BIS at least three months in advance in order for it to be purchased and implemented. o If an application is using a tool that falls off the Supported Product Matrix, a premium rate will be charged. 1.20.3 FY2004 Supported Product Matrix Database Engine (RDBMS): o Oracle Enterprise Server 9.2.0 No date set. o Oracle Enterprise Server 9.0.1 No date set. o Oracle Enterprise Server 8.1.7 No date set. o Oracle Enterprise Server 8.1.6 No date set. o Oracle Enterprise Server 7.3.4 Until June 30, 2004 Applications: o Developer 9i No date set. (Forms, Reports, Server) o Developer 6i No date set. (Forms, Reports, Server) o Developer 6.0 Until June 30, 2004 (Forms, Reports, Server) Application Server: o 9iAS, R2 No date set. o 9iAS, R1 No date set.

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