International Wine & Culture
Project
Project Example
SELECT TWO COUNTRIES AND EXPLORE THEIR STYLES IN WINE.
STUDENTS WILL PINPOINT THE TWO COUNTRIES THEY WILL ANALYZE
THROUGHO...
Switzerland
 Switzerland is one of the top wine
consuming countries in the world
 Switzerland produces more than 4
gallo...
Switzerland(cont)
“Switzerland's
particular
geographical
situation, in between
four wine-producing
nations (France,
Italy,...
Israel
 Israelis drink wine with meals and for
festive and religious occasions
 All wines from Israel are not Kosher.
Ho...
Israel (cont)
 The top 5 Israeli
wineries total 76 %
of the harvest and
the top 13 account
for 94%.
 There are 5
designa...
Part A: Compare and Contrast
Switzerland Israel
 Only 1% of Swiss wines
are exported!
 Wine has been produced
in Switzer...
Part B: Map
 Create a map showing the
geographical location of
each selected country.
DESCRIBE THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS IN THE COUNTRIES YOU’RE
COMPARING, AND INDICATE HOW THE ENVIRONMENT HAS IMPACTED
THE GR...
Switzerland Environment
 The country is located near 4 wine-producing
nations: France, Germany, Italy, and Austria.
 The...
Switzerland Environment
 The soil types vary
from region to
region in
Switzerland.
 The Ticino regions
receive more
sunl...
Israel Environment
 Israel is located in the Middle East,
near the Mediterranean Sea.
 The country‟s climate can be
desc...
Israel Environment
 The soils vary in each region.
 More volcanic soils in the north, sandy
red soils on the coast, and ...
WHAT ARE THE MAJOR HISTORICAL FACTORS THAT HAVE IMPACTED
WINE PRODUCTION IN THE COUNTRIES YOU HAVE SELECTED? HOW
HAS HISTO...
History: Switzerland
 Vineyards have been cultivated in
Switzerland since the Roman Era
 Christianity and the needs of r...
History: Israel
 The production of
wine in Israel has
been traced back
to biblical times.
 Today, the wines of
Israel ar...
WHAT IS THE DOMINANT CULTURE SURROUNDING WINES IN THE
COUNTRIES YOU HAVE SELECTED? WHAT ARE THE
CULTURAL/SOCIAL CHARACTERI...
Culture: Switzerland
 The country
produces over 4
gallons of wine per
capita
 The Swiss drink 4
times more wine
than Ame...
Culture: Switzerland (Cont)
 Restaurants and
bars serve wine, both
on a wine list and as
"open wine" (vino
aperto)
 Gene...
Culture: Israel
 Wine in Israel has
played an
important role
since biblical times
 Genesis 20:21
records that the
first ...
Culture: Israel (Cont)
 „Kiddush‟ (The
blessing of wine) is
practiced before
the Sabbath and all
festival meals
 At the ...
Culture: Israel (cont)
 Wine is not reserved for just holidays
and other celebrations in Israel, but
has found its way in...
WHAT ARE THE TRADITIONAL AND TRENDY LOCAL FOODS THAT ARE
PAIRED WITH WINE IN YOUR COUNTRIES? HOW DOES THE LOCAL
FOOD IN TH...
Local Food: Switzerland
Food Wine
Fondue and
Cheese
Cuvée Madame
Rosmarie
Mathier blanche
2010 AOC
Valais
Zürich
Geschnetz...
Local Food: Israel
Food Wine
Shatsberg‟s
Siniyeh
Golan Heights
Winery, Rom,
Yarden: A
blend of Syrah,
Cabernet
Sauvignon a...
WHAT CAN YOU DEDUCE ABOUT THE EFFECTS GEOGRAPHY,
ENVIRONMENT, HISTORY, CULTURE AND LOCAL FOOD HAVE UPON
WINE IN THE TOW CO...
Final Analysis: Switzerland
Wine production in Switzerland can be traced back to the
Roman Era. Christianity and the needs...
Final Analysis: Switzerland
(Cont)
Switzerland produces more than four gallons of wine per person. Only
about one percent ...
Final Analysis: Israel
Wine production in Israel can be traced back to biblical times. In the
book of Genesis there is a m...
Final Analysis: Israel (cont)
Israelis drink wine with meals and for festive occasions such as
Passover and Purim. The maj...
Final Analysis
◦ Wine has been produced in both Israel and Switzerland for many
years. The drinking age in both countries ...
References
 http://wine.about.com/od/winearoundtheworld/a/israelwine.htm
 http://www.wines-israel.co.il/len/
 http://ww...
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International Wine & Culture Project Example

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This was a project example created during the summer of 2013 for the International Wine and Culture course at The Florida State University. I was not the sole creator of this document. However, I was responsible for creating the first half of the project and the final analysis at the end. This presentation was shared with others in the department to modify for their courses as well.

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  • GenevaVaudValaisGrisonsTicino
  • International Wine & Culture Project Example

    1. 1. International Wine & Culture Project Project Example
    2. 2. SELECT TWO COUNTRIES AND EXPLORE THEIR STYLES IN WINE. STUDENTS WILL PINPOINT THE TWO COUNTRIES THEY WILL ANALYZE THROUGHOUT THE PROJECT AND HIGHLIGHT THEIR MAIN POINTS OF COMPARISON. (AT LEAST 3 SLIDES!) Part A: Introduction to Cultural Comparison
    3. 3. Switzerland  Switzerland is one of the top wine consuming countries in the world  Switzerland produces more than 4 gallons of wine per person!  Vineyards have been cultivated in Switzerland since the Roman era  Both red and white varietals are grown in Switzerland
    4. 4. Switzerland(cont) “Switzerland's particular geographical situation, in between four wine-producing nations (France, Italy, Germany and Austria), offers an extreme diversity in the characters of its wines.” Source: http://www.swisswine.ch/english/bie nv/main.asp  Five primary Swiss wine growing regions: 1. Geneva 2. Vaud 3. Valais 4. Grisons 5. Ticino
    5. 5. Israel  Israelis drink wine with meals and for festive and religious occasions  All wines from Israel are not Kosher. However, most do meet the requirements of being Kosher.  Both red and white varietals are grown in Israel
    6. 6. Israel (cont)  The top 5 Israeli wineries total 76 % of the harvest and the top 13 account for 94%.  There are 5 designated grape growing regions in Israel: 1. Galilee (or Gail) 2. Judean Hills 3. Samson 4. Samaria – largest grape growing region 5. Negev
    7. 7. Part A: Compare and Contrast Switzerland Israel  Only 1% of Swiss wines are exported!  Wine has been produced in Switzerland since the Roman Era  Five primary grape growing regions  Most wines are Kosher  Wine has been produced in Israel for centuries  Five designated grape growing regions
    8. 8. Part B: Map  Create a map showing the geographical location of each selected country.
    9. 9. DESCRIBE THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS IN THE COUNTRIES YOU’RE COMPARING, AND INDICATE HOW THE ENVIRONMENT HAS IMPACTED THE GROWTH OF WINE AND ITS PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION. WHAT ABOUT THE COUNTRY’S WEATHER OR GROWING PRACTICES HAS AFFECTED THE WAY PEOPLE IN THIS REGION DRINK WINE? (AT LEAST 4 SLIDES!) Part C:Environment
    10. 10. Switzerland Environment  The country is located near 4 wine-producing nations: France, Germany, Italy, and Austria.  These neighbors have a strong influence on the types of wine grown in Switzerland Image source: http://www.a1switzerlandhotels.com/switzerland- map.html
    11. 11. Switzerland Environment  The soil types vary from region to region in Switzerland.  The Ticino regions receive more sunlight than any other Swiss wine region  A portion of the Alps mountain range is located within Switzerland.
    12. 12. Israel Environment  Israel is located in the Middle East, near the Mediterranean Sea.  The country‟s climate can be described as Mediterranean.  Long, hot dry summers  Short, wet winters  Snow on northern grounds
    13. 13. Israel Environment  The soils vary in each region.  More volcanic soils in the north, sandy red soils on the coast, and chalk and limestone on the hills.
    14. 14. WHAT ARE THE MAJOR HISTORICAL FACTORS THAT HAVE IMPACTED WINE PRODUCTION IN THE COUNTRIES YOU HAVE SELECTED? HOW HAS HISTORY COLORED THE WINE CULTURE IN THOSE COUNTRIES TODAY? (AT LEAST TWO SLIDES!) Part D: History
    15. 15. History: Switzerland  Vineyards have been cultivated in Switzerland since the Roman Era  Christianity and the needs of religious services ensured the cultivation of the vineyards throughout the Middle Age and long after it.  Today, Swiss winemakers are focused on making the very best wine.
    16. 16. History: Israel  The production of wine in Israel has been traced back to biblical times.  Today, the wines of Israel are no longer reserved for traditional Jewish culture.  Israeli wines are now marketed to European and other markets as well.
    17. 17. WHAT IS THE DOMINANT CULTURE SURROUNDING WINES IN THE COUNTRIES YOU HAVE SELECTED? WHAT ARE THE CULTURAL/SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS THAT DEFINE WINE CONSUMPTION AND CULTURE IN THE TWO COUNTRIES? (AT LEAST TWO SLIDES!) Part E: Culture
    18. 18. Culture: Switzerland  The country produces over 4 gallons of wine per capita  The Swiss drink 4 times more wine than Americans  Wine is usually consumed by those 18 and over  Less than 2% of the wine produced in Switzerland is exported.
    19. 19. Culture: Switzerland (Cont)  Restaurants and bars serve wine, both on a wine list and as "open wine" (vino aperto)  Geneva produces new varieties such as Gamaret and Garanoir  The German-speaking north and east has the Riesling-Sylvaner grape that dominates around Lake Zürich  The Swiss labels (AOC) apply the same base criteria in terms of zoning and surface/production levels, authorized grape varieties and vinification
    20. 20. Culture: Israel  Wine in Israel has played an important role since biblical times  Genesis 20:21 records that the first task Noah performed following the ark was planting a vineyard.  Wine is integrated into two festivals ◦ Passover ◦ Purim
    21. 21. Culture: Israel (Cont)  „Kiddush‟ (The blessing of wine) is practiced before the Sabbath and all festival meals  At the end of the service, a wine glass is broken to signify the fall of the Temple
    22. 22. Culture: Israel (cont)  Wine is not reserved for just holidays and other celebrations in Israel, but has found its way into daily culture as well.  The wines of Israel are also being exported to both New World and European countries.
    23. 23. WHAT ARE THE TRADITIONAL AND TRENDY LOCAL FOODS THAT ARE PAIRED WITH WINE IN YOUR COUNTRIES? HOW DOES THE LOCAL FOOD IN THE COUNTRIES YOU ARE EXAMINING AFFECT WINE CULTURE? (AT LEAST TWO SLIDES!) Part F: Local Food
    24. 24. Local Food: Switzerland Food Wine Fondue and Cheese Cuvée Madame Rosmarie Mathier blanche 2010 AOC Valais Zürich Geschnetzeltes Moncucchetto Merlot 2009 Ticino DOC Cabbage Casserole Chasselas Perroy Grand Cru 2010 La Côte AOC Swiss Chocolate Pinot Noir Barrique 2008 AOC Valais  Food in Switzerland is very diverse and seasonal. Most towns have their own specialties which are influenced by the proximity of France, Germany or Italy, and their cuisines.
    25. 25. Local Food: Israel Food Wine Shatsberg‟s Siniyeh Golan Heights Winery, Rom, Yarden: A blend of Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot Variety of Salads Clos de Gat, White Dessert Wine Leg of Lamb Flam, Cabernet Sauvignon, Reserve Chakchouka (Shakshouka) Lewinsohn, Blanc, Garage de Papa  Israeli cuisine has adopted elements of various styles of Jewish cuisine and regional Arab cuisine  Wine is commonly consumed during the Jewish holidays. It doesn‟t always have to be paired with brisket, kugel and kreplach.
    26. 26. WHAT CAN YOU DEDUCE ABOUT THE EFFECTS GEOGRAPHY, ENVIRONMENT, HISTORY, CULTURE AND LOCAL FOOD HAVE UPON WINE IN THE TOW COUNTRIES? WHAT CHARACTERISTICS SAY ABOUT THE TWO CULTURES AS A WHOLE? (AT LEAST FOUR SLIDES!) Part G: Final Analysis
    27. 27. Final Analysis: Switzerland Wine production in Switzerland can be traced back to the Roman Era. Christianity and the needs of religious services ensured the cultivation of the vineyards throughout the Middle Ages and long after. Several types of wine are produced in Switzerland including Pinot Noir and the white grape varietal, Chasselas. The wine culture of Switzerland is heavily influenced by the country‟s wine-producing neighbors: Germany, Austria, France, and Italy. The Alps mountain range has also had an effect on Swiss wine. In addition there are several different types of soil throughout Switzerland including alluvial and loess. Due to the variety of soil types and terroir, each Swiss wine region is different. The primary wine regions are Geneva, Vaud, Valais, Grisons, and Ticino. The best known Swiss wines come from the Valais region. The national languages of French, German, Italian, and Romanche reflect the wine traditions and the types of grapes that are grown in the country.
    28. 28. Final Analysis: Switzerland (Cont) Switzerland produces more than four gallons of wine per person. Only about one percent of Swiss wine is actually exported. Swiss people drink four times more wine than Americans do. The country has to import approximately 45 million gallons of wine just to satisfy it‟s demand for wine. Restaurants and bars all serve wine in Switzerland, and wine is generally consumed by those who are 18 and over. Like wine, the food in Switzerland is influenced by the country‟s neighbors. Swiss cooking uses few herbs or spices and can be quite rich. When people think of Switzerland they often think of cheeses and chocolates. It is common for the Swiss to pair certain chocolates and cheeses to certain wines.
    29. 29. Final Analysis: Israel Wine production in Israel can be traced back to biblical times. In the book of Genesis there is a mention of Noah planting a vineyard. During centuries of Islamic rule, alcohol production was banned as part of the Islamic dietary laws. Today Israeli wines are no longer reserved for traditional Jewish culture. Israeli wines are currently being exported to European and other markets as well. The climate in Israel is mostly Mediterranean with volcanic soils in the north, sandy red soils on the coast, and chalk and limestone on the hills. The country is plagued by long, hot dry summers, and short, wet winters. There are five designated grape growing regions in Israel. These regions are Galilee, Judean Hills, Samson, Samaria, and Negev. The majority of wines produced in Israel are Kosher. Red wine varietals such as Syrah, Merlot, and Cabernet Sauvignon are just some of the varietals grown in Israel. Several white varietals are grown in the country as well including Chardonnay, Riesling, and Sauvignon Blanc.
    30. 30. Final Analysis: Israel (cont) Israelis drink wine with meals and for festive occasions such as Passover and Purim. The majority of wines consumed in Israel are red varietals. However, wine consumption in Israel is relatively low when compared to many Western European nations. One must be at least eighteen to drink in Israel.
    31. 31. Final Analysis ◦ Wine has been produced in both Israel and Switzerland for many years. The drinking age in both countries is 18 and there are a variety of soil types in both countries. Despite these similarities, there are several differences between each country. Israelis typically produce Kosher wines. They also do not drink a lot of wine. Israeli wines are being exported to European markets as well as some others including Canada and the United States. Switzerland produces four gallons of wine per person and only about one percent of the country‟s wine is exported. The wine regions in Switzerland are heavily influenced by the country‟s wine- producing neighbors. Switzerland‟s neighbors have not only influenced the country‟s wine, but also the food culture.
    32. 32. References  http://wine.about.com/od/winearoundtheworld/a/israelwine.htm  http://www.wines-israel.co.il/len/  http://www.swisswine.ch/english/bienv/main.asp  http://geneva.angloinfo.com/information/lifestyle/food-and- drink/wine/  http://winevibe.com/tips-faqs/swiss-wine-facts/  http://www.biblicalproductions.com/articles_A-History-of-Israels- Wine-Culture.htm  http://www.winemag.com/Wine-Enthusiast-Magazine/Web- 2011/Israeli-Wine-Pairings-Straight-from-the-Masters/  vino.com/wine/pairing/hardcheese/swiss  http://www.foodandwine.com/articles/5-great-swiss-wines http://winefolly.com/review/new-world-vs-old-world-wine/  http://www.winemag.com/Wine-Enthusiast-Magazine/Web- 2011/Decoding-Israeli-Wine/

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