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Unexpected Assurance: Rahab and the Spies | Joshua 2:1-24 Sunday School

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View/download PowerPoint slides of a Sunday School Lesson on Rahab and the spies from Joshua 2:1-24 by Danny Scotton Jr.

Theme of Joshua: Israel inherits the Promised Land. Rahab provides unexpected assurance of God’s promise. Rahab renounces that of her own people and puts her faith (active trust) in the LORD – affirming Israelite prophecy, history, and theology. This account demonstrates how non-Israelites were always a part of God’s redemptive plan. She is commended not necessarily for lying, but for demonstrating her faith through actions -- as we all should

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Unexpected Assurance: Rahab and the Spies | Joshua 2:1-24 Sunday School

  1. 1. UNEXPECTED ASSURANCE: RAHAB AND THE SPIES JOSHUA 2:1-24 ALPHA BAPTIST CHURCH ADULT SUNDAY SCHOOL 11.25.18 DANNY SCOTTON JR. TO VIEW/DOWNLOAD THESE SLIDES, PLEASE VISIT: HTTP://BIT.LY/C4C-RAHAB OR VISIT CATCHFORCHRIST.NET AND NAVIGATE TO LESSONS
  2. 2. INHERITING THE PROMISED LAND: THE THEME OF JOSHUA • God had promised Abram (later Abraham) that He would give his descendants the land of the Canaanites – as an inheritance (cf. Dt. 12:9, Jos 1:6) • 18 On that day the LORD made a covenant with Abram and said, “To your descendants I give this land, from the Wadi of Egypt to the great river, the Euphrates—19 the land of the Kenites, Kenizzites, Kadmonites, 20 Hittites, Perizzites, Rephaites, 21 Amorites, Canaanites, Girgashites and Jebusites.” (Gen 15:18-21, NIV) • The theme of the Book of Joshua: Inheriting the Promised Land (Futato) • Joshua [ַ‫ע‬ ֻׁ‫ְהֹוש‬‫י‬] means “THE LORD [YHWH] saves/delivers” (cf. Num 13:16) • The Greek form of Joshua/Yeshua is Ἰησοῦς – Jesus. • She will give birth to a son, and you are to give him the name Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins.” (Mt 1:21, NIV)
  3. 3. NEW LEADERSHIP, NEW CHAPTER • After wandering in the wilderness for 40 years due to their grumbling (Numbers 14), at the end of Deuteronomy, Israel had just finished mourning the death of Moses in Moab and swearing allegiance to Joshua – who would lead them into the Promised Land • 5 And Moses the servant of the LORD died there in Moab, as the LORD had said. 6 He buried him in Moab, in the valley opposite Beth Peor, but to this day no one knows where his grave is. 7 Moses was a hundred and twenty years old when he died, yet his eyes were not weak nor his strength gone. 8 The Israelites grieved for Moses in the plains of Moab thirty days, until the time of weeping and mourning was over. 9 Now Joshua son of Nun was filled with the spirit of wisdom because Moses had laid his hands on him. So the Israelites listened to him and did what the LORD had commanded Moses (Dt 34:5-9, NIV) • After the death of Moses the servant of the LORD, the LORD said to Joshua son of Nun, Moses’ aide: 2 “Moses my servant is dead. Now then, you and all these people, get ready to cross the Jordan River into the land I am about to give to them—to the Israelites (Jos 1:1-2, NIV)
  4. 4. REVIEW: THE KEY TO SUCCESS • 3 I will give you every place where you set your foot, as I promised Moses. 4 Your territory will extend from the desert to Lebanon, and from the great river, the Euphrates—all the Hittite country—to the Mediterranean Sea in the west. 5 No one will be able to stand against you all the days of your life. As I was with Moses, so I will be with you; I will never leave you nor forsake you. 6 Be strong and courageous, because you will lead these people to inherit the land I swore to their ancestors to give them. (Jos 1:3-6, NIV). • 7 “Be strong and very courageous. Be careful to obey all the law my servant Moses gave you; do not turn from it to the right or to the left, that you may be successful wherever you go. 8 Keep this Book of the Law always on your lips; meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do everything written in it. Then you will be prosperous and successful. 9 Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged, for the LORD your God will be with you wherever you go.” (Jos 1:7-9, NIV). • The Key to success: meditating on the law [torah] (instruction) of the LORD in order to conform one’s life to the law (instruction) of the LORD
  5. 5. BIBLICAL MEDITATION • Biblical meditation entails not emptying one’s mind as in Eastern religions, but focusing one’s mind on the LORD – reciting, reflecting, reading, and even memorizing the word of the LORD – in order to obey the word of the LORD
  6. 6. AGAIN? • Then Joshua son of Nun secretly sent two spies from Shittim. “Go, look over the land,” he said, “especially Jericho.” So they went and entered the house of a prostitute named Rahab and stayed there (Jos 2:1, NIV). • In Numbers 13-14, Moses sent out 12 spies to explore the land of Canaan • They gave Moses this account: “We went into the land to which you sent us, and it does flow with milk and honey! Here is its fruit. 28 But the people who live there are powerful, and the cities are fortified and very large (Num 13:27-28, NIV) (Howard) • Joshua son of Nun and Caleb son of Jephunneh, who were among those who had explored the land, tore their clothes 7 and said to the entire Israelite assembly, “The land we passed through and explored is exceedingly good. 8 If the LORD is pleased with us, he will lead us into that land, a land flowing with milk and honey, and will give it to us (Num 14:6-8, NIV) • Joshua and Caleb have faith in the LORD; the other ten spies are afraid of the Canaanites. • …the whole assembly talked about stoning them (Num 14:10)
  7. 7. AGAIN? • Then Joshua son of Nun secretly sent two spies from Shittim. “Go, look over the land,” he said, “especially Jericho.” So they went and entered the house of a prostitute named Rahab and stayed there (Jos 2:1, NIV). • While Israel was staying in Shittim, the men began to indulge in sexual immorality with Moabite women, 2 who invited them to the sacrifices to their gods. The people ate the sacrificial meal and bowed down before these gods. 3 So Israel yoked themselves to the Baal of Peor. And the LORD’s anger burned against them (Num 25:1-3, NIV) (Howard). • The author is using Hebrew words that can have figurative meanings for sexual encounters (Howard)-- “go into” [‫ּבֹוא‬ (bôʾ)] and lie down [‫ב‬‫כ‬ ָׁ‫ש‬ (šākab) ] (Harris), which can mean “sleep/slept” (Waltke cf. Woudstra)
  8. 8. RISKY BUSINESS • If these terms were to be euphemisms for sexual liaisons, they would be accompanied by certain prepositions (Firth) • Go in to (e.g., Samson and Delilah, Judg 16) (Hess) or lie down with someone implied sexual relations (Howard) – but these prepositions are not in the text • Given Israel’s history, the author is likely alerting readers to the risky nature of this episode (Firth). It’s risky not risqué • Rahab’s “house” was more likely a tavern, hostel or way station, which could be used by visitors, than a brothel.” (Hess cf. Howard) • This would be a strategic place to learn about the land (Harris, Hess)
  9. 9. NOT OFF TO A GOOD START • 2 The king of Jericho was told, “Look, some of the Israelites have come here tonight to spy out the land.” 3 So the king of Jericho sent this message to Rahab: “Bring out the men who came to you and entered your house, because they have come to spy out the whole land.” (Jos 2:2-3, NIV) • Repetitions reinforces key themes (Hess) • They were supposed to scout the land secretly (Jos 2:1). • Readers may be thinking: who told the king? Rahab?
  10. 10. WHERE DEY AT, DOE? • 4 But the woman had taken the two men and hidden them. She said, “Yes, the men came to me, but I did not know where they had come from. 5 At dusk, when it was time to close the city gate, they left. I don’t know which way they went. Go after them quickly. You may catch up with them.” 6 (But she had taken them up to the roof and hidden them under the stalks of flax she had laid out on the roof.) 7 So the men set out in pursuit of the spies on the road that leads to the fords of the Jordan, and as soon as the pursuers had gone out, the gate was shut. (Jos 2:4-7, NIV). • Rahab was committing treason, demonstrating showing her commitment to the spies (Hess) • She is a person of low social position frustrating the efforts of a king (McGonville) • Spies are hiding in a smelly and soggy roof (Matthews) – with no way out
  11. 11. UNEXPECTED ASSURANCE IN CHIASTIC (Χ) FORM • The spies are completely at Rahab’s mercy (McGonville), why doesn’t she give them up? • 8 Before the spies lay down for the night, she went up on the roof 9 and said to them, • “I know that the LORD has given you this land • and that a great fear of you has fallen on us, • so that all who live in this country are melting in fear because of you. • 10 We have heard how the LORD dried up the water of the Red Sea for you when you came out of Egypt, and what you did to Sihon and Og, the two kings of the Amorites east of the Jordan, whom you completely destroyed. • 11 When we heard of it, • our hearts melted in fear • and everyone’s courage failed because of you, • for the LORD your God is God in heaven above and on the earth below. (Jos 2:8-11, NIV, Hess)
  12. 12. UNEXPECTED ASSURANCE: RAHAB AFFIRMS ISRAELITE PROPHECY • I know that the LORD has given you this land and that a great fear [‫ה‬ ָׁ‫ימ‬ ֵ‫א‬ (ʾêmâ) ] of you has fallen on us, so that all who live in this country are melting in fear because of you. (Jos 2:9, NIV) • After the Exodus, Moses and the Israelites sing a song to the LORD (Exodus 15:1- 18) • the people of Canaan will melt away; 16 terror [‫ה‬ ָׁ‫ימ‬ ֵ‫א‬ (ʾêmâ) ] and dread will fall on them (Ex 15:15c-16a, NIV) – the Hebrew is “virtually identical” (Hess) • 27 “I will send my terror [‫ה‬ ָׁ‫ימ‬ ֵ‫א‬ (ʾêmâ) ] ahead of you and throw into confusion every nation you encounter. I will make all your enemies turn their backs and run (Ex 23:27, NIV).
  13. 13. UNEXPECTED ASSURANCE: RAHAB AFFIRMS ISRAELITE HISTORY • 10 We have heard how the LORD dried up the water of the Red Sea for you when you came out of Egypt, and what you did to Sihon and Og, the two kings of the Amorites east of the Jordan, whom you completely destroyed (Jos 2:10, NIV) • Israel wanted to pass through Amorite territory without any trouble, but King Sihon went out to fight them. Sihon and Og were defeated in Numbers 21:21-35 • Rahab’s hostel was probably a place frequented by out-of-town visitors, where news and rumors would be exchanged • Rahab and the people of Jericho had heard what the LORD had done through Israel • Rahab knows better than to oppose the LORD
  14. 14. UNEXPECTED ASSURANCE: RAHAB AFFIRMS ISRAELITE THEOLOGY • 11 When we heard of it, our hearts melted in fear and everyone’s courage failed because of you, for the LORD your God is God in heaven above and on the earth below. (Jos 2:11, NIV) • Rahab confesses that the LORD [YHWH] is God using language that echoes biblical affirmations of the sovereignty of the LORD and monotheism -- belief in only one God (Howard cf. Harris, McGonville) • You were shown these things so that you might know that the LORD is God; besides him there is no other. (Dt 4:35, NIV) (Howard) • You shall not make for yourself an image in the form of anything in heaven above or on the earth beneath or in the waters below (Ex 20:4, NIV) (Only see such language 3x prior, Howard) • You shall not make for yourself an image in the form of anything in heaven above or on the earth beneath or in the waters below (Dt. 5:8, NIV) (Howard) • 39 Acknowledge and take to heart this day that the LORD is God in heaven above and on the earth below. There is no other. (Dt 4:39, NIV) (Howard, Woudstra)
  15. 15. CHIASTIC ACCOUNT: CENTRAL CONFESSION • (A) The spies leave Joshua and go to Jericho (Jos 2:1) • (B) Rahab protects the spies (Jos 2:2-8) • (C) Rahab’s confession of faith (Jos 2:9-11) • (B’) The spies agree to protect Rahab (Jos 2:12-21) • (A’) The spies leave Jericho and go to Joshua (Jos 2:22-24) (Futato) • Rahab’s confession of faith (i.e., active trust) is the center – the crux – of the entire account (Bowling) • She apparently renounces the many gods of the Canaanites • She apparently affirms Israelite prophecy, history, and (monotheistic) theology.
  16. 16. COVENANTAL FAITHFULNESS • 12 “Now then, please swear to me by the LORD that you will show kindness to my family, because I have shown kindness to you. Give me a sure sign 13 that you will spare the lives of my father and mother, my brothers and sisters, and all who belong to them—and that you will save us from death. 14 “Our lives for your lives!” the men assured her. “If you don’t tell what we are doing, we will treat you kindly and faithfully when the LORD gives us the land.” (Jos 2:12-14, NIV) • Kindness = ‫ד‬ ֶ‫ס‬ ֶ‫ח‬ (ḥesed), a theologically rich word which is often translated “lovingkindness,” “unfailing love,” (TWOT) or “steadfast love” (McGonville) and means “covenantal loyalty,”(Hess) or “unfailing help to a needy covenant partner” (Waltke) • God shows covenantal love [ḥesed] to a thousand generations of those who love me and keep my commandments (Ex 20:6, NIV, Second Commandment) (Hess) • Rahab wants them to swear a solemn oath to reciprocate for her and her family (Hess, Woudstra). The ancient Near East was collectivist: group/family > individuals cf. Jos 24:15 (Waltke)
  17. 17. LET’S GET OUT OF HERE • 15 So she let them down by a rope through the window, for the house she lived in was part of the city wall. 16 She said to them, “Go to the hills so the pursuers will not find you. Hide yourselves there three days until they return, and then go on your way.” • 17 Now the men had said to her, “This oath you made us swear will not be binding on us 18 unless, when we enter the land, you have tied this scarlet cord in the window through which you let us down, and unless you have brought your father and mother, your brothers and all your family into your house. 19 If any of them go outside your house into the street, their blood will be on their own heads; we will not be responsible. As for those who are in the house with you, their blood will be on our head if a hand is laid on them. 20 But if you tell what we are doing, we will be released from the oath you made us swear.” • 21 “Agreed,” she replied. “Let it be as you say.” So she sent them away, and they departed. And she tied the scarlet cord in the window. (Jos 2:15-21, NIV) Summary (v. 15) then details(v. 16-21) (Hess, Woudstra) – a “flashback” (Firth)
  18. 18. BACK WHERE WE STARTED – WITH A TWIST • 22 When they left, they went into the hills and stayed there three days, until the pursuers had searched all along the road and returned without finding them. 23 Then the two men started back. They went down out of the hills, forded the river and came to Joshua son of Nun and told him everything that had happened to them. 24 They said to Joshua, “The LORD has surely given the whole land into our hands; all the people are melting in fear because of us (Jos 2:22-24, NIV) • 10 So Joshua ordered the officers of the people: 11 “Go through the camp and tell the people, ‘Get your provisions ready. Three days from now you will cross the Jordan here to go in and take possession of the land the LORD your God is giving you for your own.’ ” (Jos 1:10-11, NIV) (Hess) • In Numbers, two spies, Joshua and Caleb have faith in the LORD; the others are afraid of the Canaanites. In Joshua, the Canaanites are afraid; the two spies have faith in the LORD (Fee) • Unlike in Numbers, these spies’ report is not based on their own extensive espionage, but on the confession of a faithful Canaanite (Firth)
  19. 19. SHOULD THE SPIES HAVE SWORN AN OATH WITH A CANAANITE? • When the LORD drove out the nations from the Promised Land, they were to “Make no treaty with them, and show them no mercy. 3 Do not intermarry with them. Do not give your daughters to their sons or take their daughters for your sons, 4 for they will turn your children away from following me to serve other gods, and the LORD’s anger will burn against you and will quickly destroy you” (Dt 7:2-4, NIV) (Firth) • “God’s purpose in such commands was to forbid the continued existence of Canaanites as Canaanites” (Bowling) • By renouncing that of her people and confessing her faith in the LORD, Rahab is no longer truly a Canaanite – but a fellow Israelite (Firth, Howard) • Jesus discourages oaths in the New Testament (Mt 5:33-37) (Firth)
  20. 20. RAHAB IN THE NEW TESTAMENT: FAITH IN ACTION • In the same way, was not even Rahab the prostitute considered righteous for what she did when she gave lodging to the spies and sent them off in a different direction? (Jas 2:25, NIV) • 31 By faith the prostitute Rahab, because she welcomed the spies, was not killed with those who were disobedient. (Heb 11:31, NIV). • Faith is not merely something you have, it’s something you do • After Jesus’ Baptism, “From that time on Jesus began to preach, ‘Repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near.’” (Mt 4:17 cf. Mk 1:15). • Rahab is a model of someone who turns away from their former life, puts their faith in the LORD, and becomes a member of people of God
  21. 21. RAHAB: THE ANCESTOR OF JESUS • Salmon the father of Boaz, whose mother was Rahab, Boaz the father of Obed, whose mother was Ruth, Obed the father of Jesse, (Mt 1:5, NIV cf. Nolland, Osborne) • Ruth (Mt 1:5), Uriah’s wife (Bathsheba, Mt 1:6), and Tamar (Mt 1:3) are also included in Matthew’s genealogy of Jesus (cf. Howard) • Skipping generations in genealogies was normal, including women was not (Keener) • Bathsheba was at least formerly married to a Gentile (a Hittite), while the other three are all Gentiles – likely demonstrating that “God has always planned missions to all peoples (Mt 28:19).” (Keener) • During the Exodus, “Many other people went up with them…” (Ex 12:38a, NIV) (Firth) • God not only promised land to Abraham, but that “all peoples on earth will be blessed through you” (Gen 12:3b, NIV cf. Gal 3:8)
  22. 22. CONCLUSION: UNEXPECTED ASSURANCE OF GOD’S PROMISE • Theme of Joshua: Israel inherits the Promised Land. Rahab provides unexpected assurance of God’s promise. • (A) The spies leave Joshua and go to Jericho (Jos 2:1) • (B) Rahab protects the spies (Jos 2:2-8) • (C) Rahab’s confession of faith (Jos 2:9-11) • (B’) The spies agree to protect Rahab (Jos 2:12-21) • (A’) The spies leave Jericho and go to Joshua (Jos 2:22-24) (Futato) • Rahab renounces that of her own people and puts her faith (active trust) in the LORD – affirming Israelite prophecy, history, and theology • This account demonstrates how non-Israelites were always a part of God’s redemptive plan • She is commended not necessarily for lying, but for demonstrating her faith through actions To view/download these slides, please visit: Http://Bit.ly/C4C-Rahab or visit CatchForChrist.net and navigate to Lessons
  23. 23. BIBLIOGRAPHY Bowling, Andrew C. “Joshua.” In Evangelical Commentary on the Bible, 3:135–57. Baker Reference Library. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House, 1995. Fee, Gordon D., and Robert L. Hubbard Jr., eds. The Eerdmans Companion to the Bible. Grand Rapids, MI; Cambridge, U.K.: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2011. Firth, David G. The Message of Joshua. Edited by Alec Motyer and Derek Tidball. The Bible Speaks Today. Nottingham, England: Inter-Varsity Press, 2015. Futato, Mark D. OT101 Introducing the Old Testament: Its Structure and Story. Logos Mobile Education. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2013. Harris, J. Gordon, Cheryl A. Brown, and Michael S. Moore. Joshua, Judges, Ruth. Edited by W. Ward Gasque, Robert L. Hubbard Jr., and Robert K. Johnston. Understanding the Bible Commentary Series. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 2012. Harris, R. Laird, Gleason L. Archer Jr., and Bruce K. Waltke, eds. Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament. Chicago: Moody Press, 1999. Hess, Richard S. Joshua: An Introduction and Commentary. Vol. 6. Tyndale Old Testament Commentaries. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1996. Howard, David M., Jr. Joshua. Vol. 5. The New American Commentary. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1998. Keener, Craig S. The IVP Bible Background Commentary: New Testament. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1993. Matthews, Victor Harold, Mark W. Chavalas, and John H. Walton. The IVP Bible Background Commentary: Old Testament. Electronic ed. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2000. McConville, J. Gordon, and Stephen N. Williams. Joshua. The Two Horizons Old Testament Commentary. Grand Rapids, MI; Cambridge, U.K.: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2010. Nolland, John. The Gospel of Matthew: A Commentary on the Greek Text, New International Greek Testament Commentary . Grand Rapids, MI; Carlisle: W.B. Eerdmans; Paternoster Press, 2005. Osborne, Grant R. Matthew, vol. 1. Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2010. Waltke, Bruce K. “Joshua.” In New Bible Commentary: 21st Century Edition, edited by D. A. Carson, R. T. France, J. A. Motyer, and G. J. Wenham, 4th ed., 233–60. Leicester, England; Downers Grove, IL: Inter-Varsity Press, 1994. Woudstra, Marten H. The Book of Joshua. The New International Commentary on the Old Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1981.
  24. 24. BONUS: SHOULD RAHAB HAVE LIED? • Regarding biblical interpretation, there is a difference between description (this is how things went) and prescription (this is how things should go) • In the NT, Rahab is not necessarily commended for lying. Lying to save the spies is described but not necessarily prescribed • In the same way, was not even Rahab the prostitute considered righteous for what she did when she gave lodging to the spies and sent them [the spies] off in a different direction? (Jas 2:25, NIV); • 31 By faith the prostitute Rahab, because she welcomed the spies, was not killed with those who were disobedient. (Heb 11:31, NIV). • Two absolutes: (1) human life should be protected | (2) it is wrong to lie (e.g., Lev 19:11) (Howard) or bear false witness (Ex 20:16) • Three main views: (Howard) 1. “Lesser of two evils” (also called “conflicting absolutes” or “realism”): when there is no other alternative, people should commit the lesser sin and then repent. But, did Jesus ever face a situation like this? How could he and remained sinless (cf. Heb 4:15)? Does God hold people accountable when they have no other choice? 2. “The greater good” (also called “hierarchicalism” or “graded absolutism”): people should act according to the greater good – which, on this view, is not sinful. Proponents cite the Hebrew midwives (Ex 1:17-21, though the emphasis is on “fearing God,” not lying), and Mt 23:23 (there are weightier matters of the law), etc. But there are no explicit, exhaustive moral hierarchies laid out in Scripture; the “greater good” can be subject to human, subjective opinion. 3. “Nonconflicting absolutes”: there will always be a “third way” that is not sinful (cf. 1 Cor 10:13); ends do not justify the means (cf. Rom 3:7-8). If people lied to preserve human life, would the disciples have become martyrs? Would any Christian? • “Thus, in evaluating Rahab, we must render a mixed verdict, one that condemns her lie and momentary lack of trust in God, but one that commends her faith, both in deed and in word.” (Howard)
  25. 25. BONUS: TYPOLOGY… USE WITH CAUTION • Many, dating back to the time of the Church fathers, have connected Rahab’s scarlet cord figuratively with the scarlet sacrificial blood of Jesus Christ. This is probably reading too much into the text (Howard, Harris) • E.g. “As Israel needed the scarlet blood of the lamb on their door-frames to distinguish them from the condemned Egyptians (Ex. 12:7, 13), so Rahab needed this scarlet cord that the Israelites provided to distinguish her and her family from the doomed Canaanites.” (Waltke) • “Some of the Church Fathers considered the red cord that Rahab used as a sign whereby she and her family would be spared from death to be a symbol of the blood of Christ. Rahab herself was considered a symbol of the Church, since she by her faith and kindness secured the safety of her family. Typological connections of this sort must be handled with great care.” (Woudstra) • However, the word for scarlet cord (‫י‬ִ‫נ‬ ָׁ‫ש‬ | šānî) is also used in the Genesis account featuring Tamar (Howard) • 28 As she was giving birth, one of them put out his hand; so the midwife took a scarlet thread [‫י‬ִ‫נ‬ ָׁ‫ש‬ | šānî] and tied it on his wrist and said, “This one came out first.” (Gen 38:28, NIV) • Previously, Judah thought she was a prostitute: 15 When Judah saw her, he thought she was a prostitute, for she had covered her face (Gen 38:15, NIV) • Howard believes there may be a connection between Rahab and Tamar who both were foreigners and (at least thought to be in the case of Tamar) prostitutes associated with a scarlet cord (‫י‬ִ‫נ‬ ָׁ‫ש‬ | šānî) and found in the lineage of Jesus (Mt 1:3, 5). • My Old Testament professor believes this may be reading too much into the text, as well

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