Cd1 cognitive

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  • Cd1 cognitive

    1. 1. COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN THE PRESCHOOL YEARS By: Daniella Leon
    2. 2. Piaget’s Stage of Pre operational ThinkingPreschool years is an important time of stability and change. Piagetsuggested that preschoolers from the age 2-7 years go through a stagecalled Pre operational stage.This stage lasts all through the preschool years ranging from 2-7. Duringthis stage children’s use of symbolic thinking grows, mental reasoningemerges, and the use of concepts increases. They begin to grow lessdependent on sensorimotor activity. Although this does not mean thatthey are capable of operations.Instead of being totally capable of operations they deal with a PreOperational thought called symbolic function. Which is the ability touse mental symbols, an object to represent something as an example.
    3. 3. Subsets linking to Pre Operational Thinking - The Relation Between Language and Thought - Centration -Conservation -Incomplete Understanding of Transformation -Egocentrism -The Emergence of Intuitive Thought
    4. 4. The Relation Between Language and ThoughtChildren in preschool make great progress in languageskills.Children using language allows them to think aboveand beyond, out side the box.Language and thought are linked (according to Piaget)and because of this it improves the type of thinkingchildren do. Going back to thinking out side the box.Piaget believes that improvement during the earliersensorimotor period are necessary for languagedevelopment.
    5. 5. Centration: What You See Is What You Think Centration: The process of concentration on one limited aspect of a stimulus and ignoring other aspects*Preschoolers won’t consider all the information provided, they instead will concentrate on the obvious provided element/s on what they see and go by that intuition. *They tend to focus more on appearance.
    6. 6. Conservation: Learning That Appearances Are Deceiving Conservation: The knowledge that quantity is unrelated to the arrangement and physical appearance of objects.Most kids at this age group have not yet developed thistrait. Which allows them to understand the change in appearance.Piaget believes that this happens because of their lack of centration prevents them from putting their attention on relevant appearances
    7. 7. Incomplete Understanding of TransformationTransformation: The process whereby one state is changed into another. -Meaning: That children in the pre operational stage do not comprehend or don’t recall the steps in between.
    8. 8. Egocentrism: The Inability to Take Others’ Perspective Egocentrism: Thinking that does not take the viewpoints of others into account.-This means that children do not have any remorse of the effect something may have on others.-2 Forms of Egocentrism: One, the lack of awarenessthat others see things from a different point of view. Two, that others might have a different physical perspective as well.
    9. 9. Intuitive Thought Intuitive Thought: Thinking that reflects preschoolers’ use of positive reasoning and their avid acquisition of knowledge about the world. -This means that children, naturally, are curious. -By becoming curious and trying things out children begin to push towards the end of this phase and begin to learn functionality, and they also begin to show identity.
    10. 10. All together Piaget’s Approach...Pre Operational period is far from idle. There are manycognitive skills preschoolers still have to master.And even though Piaget believed and suggested allthese things recent studies have found that heunderestimated these young little rascals and that theyare very capable to do some of the things he mentionedat an early age.
    11. 11. ResourcesChild Development (Fifth Edition) Robert S.FeldmanGoogle Images

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