Football as a vehicle for social change:reflections from the fieldDan Parnell, University of Derby &Kathryn Dunn, Liverpoo...
The Journey for today• Background of Football in the Community• Setting the Scene: The Partnership• Overview of Methods• T...
Background• Football in Community programmes started in 1986 tobuild greater links between clubs and communities (Brown,Cr...
The LJMU/EitC Partnership                            Vision:                            “To motivate, educate             ...
Everton Active Family Centre (EAFC)In 2008, the joint venture between Everton in the Community andLiverpool John Moores Un...
Methods6 years (2006-2012) of applied research- ethnographic (Hammersley and Atkinson, 2007)- reflective diaries & field n...
Health Promotion Children(2006-2007)
Health Promotion Children: Intervention
Health Promotion Children: Results• Keeping the active kids active• Initiative experienced high attrition rates (54%)• Som...
Health Promotion Children: Results• Coaches tended to adopt a performance oriented approachto their sessions.• Coaches wer...
Health Promotion Children: Conclusion • The adoption of a performance orientated approach and the absence of any healthful...
Health Promotion Men (18-35yrs)(2008 onwards within EAFC)
Health Promotion Men (18-35yrs): InterventionFitness sessions per week:5. Football (Monday PM)6. Circuit Training (Tuesday...
Health Promotion Men (18-35yrs): Intervention     A series of 12 week interventions with targeted hard-to-    reach popula...
Health Promotion Men (18-35yrs): Intervention•   Yo-Yo•   20m Sprint•   30m Sprint•   T-agility•   Body Mass Index•   Rest...
Health Promotion Men (18-35yrs): Results• Total % body fat and total fat mass decreased• Lean mass increased• Blood pressu...
Health Promotion Men (18-35yrs): Results“ I do really enjoy coming. It’s sound, I love it but I can’t always get here.    ...
Health Promotion Men (18-35yrs): Conclusion • Practitioners should gain a greater understanding of the day-to-day existenc...
Health Promotion Older Men(2010-2011)
Health Promotion Older Men: Intervention• FIT FANS: bespoke 1-2-1 support via a personal holisticlifestyle practitioner• T...
Health Promotion Older Men: Results   7 older men (aged over 50 years from the local community)    some with a number of d...
Health Promotion Older Men: ConclusionWhilst there were significant physiological changes, the  psychosocial changes that ...
Concluding comment• FitC coaches are generally good people and provide a funservice• However a shift in skill base is requ...
Ways Forward for FitC Schemes• Develop research skills or partnerships with academia• Relevant career professional develop...
AcknowledgementsLiverpool John Moores UniversityDr David Richardson - Director of StudiesDr Barry Drust - SupervisorDr Reb...
ReferencesDunn, K., Drust, B., Flower, D., and Richardson, D. Kicking the habit: abiopsychosocial account of engaging men ...
Thank you for listening.Any questions?Dan ParnellSchool of ScienceUniversity of Derbyt: 07538500348e: d.parnell@derby.ac.u...
Everton Football ClubGoodison ParkLiverpoolL4 4EL0871 663 18780151 286 9112evertonfc.com
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Football in the community dan parnell

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Dan Parnell and Kathryn Dunn present their reflective experiences from many years engaged within an English Premier League Football Club. Specifically, exploring the role football can play in promoting social change (inc. health and social inclusion).
Related blog here: http://communityfootball.wordpress.com/2012/07/24/reflection-from-football-in-the-community/

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Football in the community dan parnell

  1. 1. Football as a vehicle for social change:reflections from the fieldDan Parnell, University of Derby &Kathryn Dunn, Liverpool John Moores University
  2. 2. The Journey for today• Background of Football in the Community• Setting the Scene: The Partnership• Overview of Methods• The Projects• Reflections• Ways Forward
  3. 3. Background• Football in Community programmes started in 1986 tobuild greater links between clubs and communities (Brown,Crabbe and Mellor, 2006)• Initially focused on traditional football coaching with youngchildren (Mellor, 2008)• However, FitC schemes have begun to tackle major socialagendas (i.e., social inclusion, obesity, mental health)(Watson, 2000)
  4. 4. The LJMU/EitC Partnership Vision: “To motivate, educate and inspire by harnessing the power of football and sport to change lives within our community”
  5. 5. Everton Active Family Centre (EAFC)In 2008, the joint venture between Everton in the Community andLiverpool John Moores University, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences,saw the development of the Everton Active Family Centre (EAFC) which isa unique fitness facility based within the grounds of Goodison Park.
  6. 6. Methods6 years (2006-2012) of applied research- ethnographic (Hammersley and Atkinson, 2007)- reflective diaries & field notes (Krane and Baird, 2005)- observational research (Hammersley and Atkinson, 1983)
  7. 7. Health Promotion Children(2006-2007)
  8. 8. Health Promotion Children: Intervention
  9. 9. Health Promotion Children: Results• Keeping the active kids active• Initiative experienced high attrition rates (54%)• Some negative memories relating to the coaches’ practice In some cases coaching practice failed to support or create a positive developmental environment relevant for the age and (football) ability of the participants.
  10. 10. Health Promotion Children: Results• Coaches tended to adopt a performance oriented approachto their sessions.• Coaches were required to possess a minimum of a FootballAssociation Level 2 Coaching Qualification (which has little orno health specific content). UEFA ‘A’ License Coaching Level 3 UEFA B Coaching Level 2 Coaching Level 1
  11. 11. Health Promotion Children: Conclusion • The adoption of a performance orientated approach and the absence of any healthful sentiments or behaviour change message limited the effectiveness of the initiative. • Despite the coaches did (usually) provide a fun and enjoyable experience. In order, to (explicitly) promote positive healthful change, coaches require a wider skill base. • Specifically, skills that enable them to understand, translate and encourage positive healthful change within a variety of populations with varying levels of ability.
  12. 12. Health Promotion Men (18-35yrs)(2008 onwards within EAFC)
  13. 13. Health Promotion Men (18-35yrs): InterventionFitness sessions per week:5. Football (Monday PM)6. Circuit Training (Tuesday PM)7. Boxing (Thursday PM)Capacity of 15 participantsper sessionOn going for duration of the projectVIDEO
  14. 14. Health Promotion Men (18-35yrs): Intervention A series of 12 week interventions with targeted hard-to- reach populations- Men living in homeless shelters- Men recovering from drug misuse Two, 2 hour, fitness sessions per week: Tuesday: Football Thursday: Football & specific fitness training Testing pre and post the intervention to identify changes in health and fitness and health screening throughout.
  15. 15. Health Promotion Men (18-35yrs): Intervention• Yo-Yo• 20m Sprint• 30m Sprint• T-agility• Body Mass Index• Resting Heart Rate• Blood Pressure• LDL & HDL Cholesterol• Lean Mass• Fat Mass• % Fat• Electrocardiograph (ECG) Screening
  16. 16. Health Promotion Men (18-35yrs): Results• Total % body fat and total fat mass decreased• Lean mass increased• Blood pressure decreased• Resting heart rate decreased• Developments in social capital• Improved psychological wellbeing• High attrition rate
  17. 17. Health Promotion Men (18-35yrs): Results“ I do really enjoy coming. It’s sound, I love it but I can’t always get here. I’ve got other stuff going on. D’ya know what I mean?” Craig*, 25.“ I’ve messed up again. Now I have to see my parole officer every Tuesday and I never feel like coming after that” Rob* 23 “ I can’t afford the bus fare. I want to come like, but just can’t always get up there” Gary* 31.
  18. 18. Health Promotion Men (18-35yrs): Conclusion • Practitioners should gain a greater understanding of the day-to-day existence of the target populations and recognise the challenges associated with the population whom they are engaging prior to programme implementation • ‘Bottom up’ rather than ‘top down’ approach • Broader skill base of practitioners in order to collect information on the effectiveness of an intervention
  19. 19. Health Promotion Older Men(2010-2011)
  20. 20. Health Promotion Older Men: Intervention• FIT FANS: bespoke 1-2-1 support via a personal holisticlifestyle practitioner• Through the development of realistic, simple goal settingthe project aimed to provide a range of lifestyle relatedbehaviour changes, measured on a 6 week basis• RHR, BP, BMI• Lifestyle Changes• PA & Food Diaries• Abdominal circumference
  21. 21. Health Promotion Older Men: Results 7 older men (aged over 50 years from the local community) some with a number of disabilities or illnesses (diabetes, depression, addiction, chronic back pain, cancer, gout, osteoarthritis) took part in a 6 week ‘rolling’ programme (between 2010-2011). ---------------------------------------------------------------• Physical measurements did not significantly change• Subtle but important lifestyle changes took place:- personal more important than just losing weight- completing daily task (i.e., walking to the shops)• Men stated that the practitioners played a critical rolein their continued participation in the programme
  22. 22. Health Promotion Older Men: ConclusionWhilst there were significant physiological changes, the psychosocial changes that occurred were powerfulA caring, informed, multi-skilled practitioner (i.e., data collection, health, exercise, psychology, counselling skill & knowledge of special populations and behaviour change) was essential in:(g) Maintaining engagement(h) Providing a service in the heart ofan area of multiple deprivation(j) Deploying evidence based practice(k) Collating evidence of impact
  23. 23. Concluding comment• FitC coaches are generally good people and provide a funservice• However a shift in skill base is required in order to meet thedemands of new social agendas (i.e., obesity)• A ‘new age’ practitioner is needed in the more recent, morecomplex projects – whom possess a broader skill base• Evident that psychosocial/lifestyle behaviour change ispresent across programmes, as opposed to majorphysiological health changes > the foundations are there for greater success!
  24. 24. Ways Forward for FitC Schemes• Develop research skills or partnerships with academia• Relevant career professional development for practitionersand coaches alike• Build bespoke programmes to suit participants withappropriately skilled practitioners
  25. 25. AcknowledgementsLiverpool John Moores UniversityDr David Richardson - Director of StudiesDr Barry Drust - SupervisorDr Rebecca Murphy – SupervisorProfessor Gareth Stratton- SupervisorMr Dan Bingham- EAFC PractitionerEverton in the CommunityDenise Barrett Baxendale - CEOChris Clarke - Head of Business DevelopmentDean Jones - Premier League Health Coach
  26. 26. ReferencesDunn, K., Drust, B., Flower, D., and Richardson, D. Kicking the habit: abiopsychosocial account of engaging men recovering from drug misuse inregular recreational football. Journal of Men’s Health, 2011; 8(3), 233.Dunn K, Drust B, Richardson D. 2010. I just want to watch the match! Areflective account of mens health themed match day events at an EnglishPremier League Football Club. Journal of Mens Health, vol. 7(3), 323.Parnell D, Stratton, G, Drust B, Richardson D. Football in the CommunitySchemes: exploring the Effectiveness of an Intervention in PromotingHealthful Behaviour Change. Soccer & Society, 2013 vol. 14(1)
  27. 27. Thank you for listening.Any questions?Dan ParnellSchool of ScienceUniversity of Derbyt: 07538500348e: d.parnell@derby.ac.ukw: www.derby.ac.ukKathryn Dunn MScResearch Institute for Sport & Exercise SciencesLiverpool John Moores Universityt: 0044 151 530 5263e: k.m.dunn@ljmu.ac.ukw: www.ljmu.ac.uk
  28. 28. Everton Football ClubGoodison ParkLiverpoolL4 4EL0871 663 18780151 286 9112evertonfc.com

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