Professional Learning Communities<br />Module One:<br />Foundations of PLC<br />
Objectives<br />Conceptual Framework<br />Correlates of Effective Schools – Lezotte<br />DuFour, Eaker, & DuFour<br />Hord...
Correlates of Effective Schools<br />Initiated by Coleman in 1966 with the publication of “The Equal Educational Opportuni...
Correlates of Effective Schools<br />Instructional Leadership of the Principal<br />Clear and Focused Mission<br />Safe an...
Three Levels of Responsibility<br />School Level<br />Teacher Level<br />Student Level<br />Marzano, 2003<br />
On Common Ground<br />	“	To create a professional learning community, focus on learning rather than teaching, work collabo...
Big Idea #1<br />	Ensuring Students Learn<br />
A Culture of Collaboration<br />Big Idea #2<br />
Big Idea #3<br />A Focus on Results<br />
Dimensions of PLCs<br />  Shared values and vision<br />  Shared, supportive leadership<br />  Collective learning and app...
Shared Values and Vision<br />“The shared vision, mission, and goals that the staff members see as their common purpose.”<...
Shared and Supportive Leadership<br />Shared power, authority, and decision-making<br />
Collective Learning and Application<br />(1)  Collaboratively examine student learning and data to plan differentiated ins...
Supportive ConditionsRelationships and Structures<br />Provide the structural and relational supports required to sustain ...
Shared Practice<br />On a foundation of trust, teachers work together to examine personal practices.<br />
Table Activity: PLC Chart<br /> Find the envelope on the left hand side of your folder labeled “Traditional v. PLC”. <br /...
PLCs	Traditional   v.      PLC                 <br />
PLCs	   Traditional        v.            PLC <br />
PLCs	   Traditional        v.            PLC <br />
Reflection<br />What are the implications PLCs on your personal practices?<br />What are two benefits that you see from mo...
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Genesis introduction foundation

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  • The path to professional learning communities requires direct, strategic planning. Without understanding the concept of PLC’s, a potential deterrent to progress is superficial application of basic concepts. Data analysis modeling is necessary to prevent tangential exploration that can deter from the result focus. Also, the modeling helps demonstrate what types of data are relevant to everyday instruction versus trend or pattern data.
  • Marzano explored using the correlates in the school improvement processSchool Level – Curriculum, High Expectations, Parental Involvement, Safe and Orderly Involvement (Principal has primary responsibility)Teacher Level - personal decisions on instruction, management, and curriculum serves as a catalyst or impediment to student achievementStudent Level – explores the impact of the home environment, learned intelligence, and motivation
  • The school vision of collaboration and student achievement drives a PLC.Each PLC will develop missions for their groups that align with the overall school vision. As the PLC matures, the responsibility for assuring the alignment of these visions moves from administrator to PLC group.
  • Developing a PLC means developing the leadership capacity of all of the individuals involved in the collective PLC effort. As a result, leadership has a dual role: (1) foster the leadership of others; and (2) develop the active participation of stakeholders in decision-making.
  • Structural supports include common planning time, physical location, meeting protocols, and school procedures that support collaboration.Relational supports include development of positive school culture, professional respect, fostering of trust, and building leadership capacity.
  • Teachers share instructional strategies, lesson plans, and student performance for the purpose of finding more effective methods of meeting student needs. Peer coaching and observations builds on the foundation of trust that reinforces the purpose of actions as student learning.
  • Genesis introduction foundation

    1. 1. Professional Learning Communities<br />Module One:<br />Foundations of PLC<br />
    2. 2. Objectives<br />Conceptual Framework<br />Correlates of Effective Schools – Lezotte<br />DuFour, Eaker, & DuFour<br />Hord<br />Hipp & Huffman<br />
    3. 3. Correlates of Effective Schools<br />Initiated by Coleman in 1966 with the publication of “The Equal Educational Opportunity Survey”<br />Identified the potential impact of family factors (poverty & parental educational level) on student achievement<br />Led to the creation of compensatory models of education such as Title I to address potential limitations<br />
    4. 4. Correlates of Effective Schools<br />Instructional Leadership of the Principal<br />Clear and Focused Mission<br />Safe and Orderly Environment<br />Climate of High Expectations<br />Frequent Monitoring of Student Progress<br />Positive Home-School Relations<br />Opportunity to Learn & Student Time on Task<br />
    5. 5. Three Levels of Responsibility<br />School Level<br />Teacher Level<br />Student Level<br />Marzano, 2003<br />
    6. 6. On Common Ground<br /> “ To create a professional learning community, focus on learning rather than teaching, work collaboratively, and hold yourself accountable for results."<br />DuFour (2004)<br />
    7. 7. Big Idea #1<br /> Ensuring Students Learn<br />
    8. 8. A Culture of Collaboration<br />Big Idea #2<br />
    9. 9. Big Idea #3<br />A Focus on Results<br />
    10. 10. Dimensions of PLCs<br /> Shared values and vision<br /> Shared, supportive leadership<br /> Collective learning and application <br /> Supportive conditions<br /> Shared personal practice<br />
    11. 11. Shared Values and Vision<br />“The shared vision, mission, and goals that the staff members see as their common purpose.”<br />Shirley Hord (2008)<br />
    12. 12. Shared and Supportive Leadership<br />Shared power, authority, and decision-making<br />
    13. 13. Collective Learning and Application<br />(1) Collaboratively examine student learning and data to plan differentiated instruction based on student needs.<br />(2) Collaboratively examine professional growth needs to intentionally plan professional learning.<br />
    14. 14. Supportive ConditionsRelationships and Structures<br />Provide the structural and relational supports required to sustain PLC practices.<br />
    15. 15. Shared Practice<br />On a foundation of trust, teachers work together to examine personal practices.<br />
    16. 16. Table Activity: PLC Chart<br /> Find the envelope on the left hand side of your folder labeled “Traditional v. PLC”. <br /> Find the handout #1 with the two columns labeled “Traditional v. PLC”.<br /> Categorize the labels from the envelope into the columns on Handout #1.<br />
    17. 17. PLCs Traditional v. PLC <br />
    18. 18. PLCs Traditional v. PLC <br />
    19. 19. PLCs Traditional v. PLC <br />
    20. 20. Reflection<br />What are the implications PLCs on your personal practices?<br />What are two benefits that you see from moving toward PLCs?<br />What are two concerns that you have about toward PLCs?<br />

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