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A Rubric For District Robotics Success: A Buyer's Guide & Hands On Experience With The VEX, Lego EV3 and Tetrix Robotics Platforms

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Looking to invest in robotics for your district? This presentation will provide participants with a hands-on buying guide to help review the largest robotics platforms Lego EV3, VEX EDR and Tetrix platforms with a hands on demonstration of their different building options, required programming skills and controller capabilities. In addition to these platforms a range of low cost options for elementary robotics will also be discussed and shown such as the Edison and Bee-Bot platforms. Leave this presentation informed on the features of these platforms and a rubric to help you select robotics platforms based on your educational and financial goals.
This presentation will also highlight the essential 21st Century Skills and Computer Science skills that robotics bring to a students learning. View classroom videos, robotics challenges and experience these platforms for yourself.

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A Rubric For District Robotics Success: A Buyer's Guide & Hands On Experience With The VEX, Lego EV3 and Tetrix Robotics Platforms

  1. 1. A 21st Century Rubric For District Robotics Success: A Buyer's Guide & Hands On Experience with Robotics Platforms Daniel Downs and Kathy Dasho http://bit.ly/2FkVZDI
  2. 2. District Vision For Robotics & Digital Learning/Computer Science: ● K-5: Digital Learning/Computer Science & Robotics Integrated and Embedded Within Curriculum: Embedded in Digital Learning Block ● 6-8: Digital Literacy & Computer Science Course and Robotics 1 & 2 Robotics club for Middle School students since 2012 ● 9-12: Introduced 1 course(Robotics Academy( Vex EDR) in 2016 additional course(Robotics II:Tetrix) in 2017 and FIRST Robotics Team and Change Team Help Desk students have been active with Robotics since 2015
  3. 3. Deeper Look Goal Setting: ● Language based review of DLCS standards and Co- Teaching in Elementary for more enhanced instructional opportunities with computer science and robotics ● District wide development of Robotics Competencies to scale student learning and curriculum alignment ● Continue refine course sequences at all levels and review student skill sets and their appropriate mapping
  4. 4. Our Process: ● Our process began with expanding the Digital Learning Specialist position into all schools and having the embedding learning block (2015) ● Digital Literacy & CS teaching positions in the middle school were created in 2012-13 and an additional position in 2015. ● The business department which had the web page design course as its main technology offering added the Robotics Academy course to its offerings and within the year the department has been renamed to Digital Learning & Entrepreneurship. This department plans to expand CS and STEAM related courses and cross list with departments with overarching standards and skills.
  5. 5. Why Robotics in the Curriculum? 1. Students are engaged 2. Effective way of introducing programming into curriculum 3. Provides skills useful in future employment such as collaboration 4. Accessible for students with a range of abilities. 5. Demystifies a complex technology
  6. 6. Higher Order Skills ❏ Plenty of resources are available on the internet for teachers, for example, robot kits such as Lego Mindstorms and Vex Robotics, simple programmable robots such as Sphero balls, and lesson plans. Sophisticated, engaging robots such as the NAO robot are also available. ❏ Robots lend themselves to do-it- yourself activities. For example, a colleague builds robots using a 3D printer and uses his smart phone as an interactive device to communicate with the printed robot.
  7. 7. Robots in the Curriculum Robotics engages students https://youtu.be/ZY8KKU-6j8Y
  8. 8. Course Competencies Description/Resources Required Skills Digital Literacy & Computer Science Strands Project Management Middle School:complexity,applicati on-- Design Process with Technology/Project Management- Adaptability”adaptability of robotic-input-output) Generating ideas Identifying Criteria and Specifying Constraints Communicating Results Identifying a problem CT: Computational Thinking a. Abstraction Autonomous Movement & Programming For Decision Making Middle School:autonomy and pre-programming decision making Program a robot using software to do several autonomous tasks. Testing and evaluating a design Refining a design CT: Computational Thinking a. Abstraction b. Algorithms c. Data d. Programming and Development e. Modeling and Simulation Iterative Design Process & Advanced Problem Solving Middle School:iteration of process----engineering design process,deconstruct and (Advanced Problem Solving)(debugging skills) Problem analysis Critical thinking Logical thinking programming skills Essential vocabulary Engineering Design Process Troubleshooting, invention, innovation, and experimentation CT: Computational Thinking a. Abstraction b. Algorithms c. Data d. Programming and Development e. Modeling and Simulation Teamwork & Accountability Middle School: Grit/Resilience Project Teams & Accountability Team cooperation Leadership and responsibility CT: Computational Thinking a. Abstraction b. Algorithms c. Data d. Programming and Development e. Modeling and Simulation
  9. 9. Designing Elegant Solutions (ELegant solutions,simplicity of code) Programming switches and loops Deconstructing code and seeing patterns in the code Simplifying code Reusing subroutines Programming Practice Robotic Building: Understanding Basic Structures Middle School:Background in basic structures(mini- challenges) Making a model or prototype Inventory of parts Part types and use Mechanical Design Sub-assemblies CS: Computing Systems a. Computing Devices b. Human and Computer Partnerships c. Networks d. Services Robotics Hardware & Software Student Knowledge about the Lego and Vex IQ Platforms and the software and hardware capabilities that are used. Sensors,building components Programming Languages Input, output ports Connector cables Handling the equipment Charging the brick Downloading the code onto the brick Connecting sensors to the brick
  10. 10. Robotics Academy: Robotics Competencies In Robotics Academy, students design, fabricate, program, and use task-oriented robots. Students demonstrate mastery by building robots utilizing a variety of sensors and combine them with a controller to build a complete system designed to accomplish a task. The fundamentals of problem-solving, program design, algorithms, and programming using a high-level language are central to this course. This course includes the study of current industrial, commercial, governmental, and competitive robotics. Students are expected to keep a web-based notebook at every phase of the design process. Upon the completion of each project, students present their results in a formal presentation. No previous experience in robotics, electronics, or mechanics is necessary.
  11. 11. Course Competencies Description/Resources Required Skills Digital Literacy & Computer Science Strands Introduction to Pseudo- code Pseudocode is a set of basic steps that the human can use to write the program Write some pseudocode for a program which moves as long as a touch sensor is not pressed, but stops and turns to the right if its sonar detects an object less than 20in away. CT: Computational Thinking a. Abstraction b. Algorithms c. Data d. Programming and Development e. Modeling and Simulation Breaking Programs into Behaviors Basic rules on how to think about programming and syntax Basic Behaviors Example: Turn on Motor Port 3 at half power Simple Behaviors Example: Move forward for 2 seconds Complex Behaviors Example: Follow a defined path through an entire maze CT: Computational Thinking a. Abstraction b. Algorithms c. Data d. Programming and Development e. Modeling and Simulation Introduction to Natural Language Programming Reference Documents Sample Commands: Usage with Parameters: forward(63); untilTouch(dgtl10); stop(); CT: Computational Thinking a. Abstraction b. Algorithms c. Data d. Programming and Development e. Modeling and Simulation Robotic Building Vex Kits - Robot Building Instructions Build ClawBot CS: Computing Systems a. Computing Devices b. Human and Computer Partnerships c. Networks d. Services Wireless System Configuration Setup and configure Vex Cortex wireless communications Setup and test wireless communications using cortex and joystick (controller) CS: Computing Systems a. Computing Devices b. Human and Computer Partnerships c. Networks d. Services Wired System Configuration Configure a wired system Setup and test wired communications using cortex and joystick (controller) CS: Computing Systems a. Computing Devices b. Human and Computer Partnerships c. Networks d. Services
  12. 12. Virtual Robot Configuration Virtual Robot vs Physical robot How to use Robot Virtual Worlds Complete virtual program Coderz DTC: Digital Tools and Collaboration a. Digital Tools b. Collaboration and Communication c. Research Movement Challenge: Labyrinth Challenge Moving Forward - Level one programming The Labyrinth Challenge requires students to program their robot to travel a specific distance, turn accurately, and then repeat these behaviors multiple times. Reversing Motor Polarity Renaming Motors Timing Teamwork & Collaboration Moving Forward Programming and Engineering Investigation Motor Power Levels Turn and Reverse Manual Straightening Sentry Simulation Shaft Encoders Forward for Distance While Loops Boolean Logic Sensor Debug Window Forward and Turning Automated Straightening - If/Else, variables, values Values and Variables Integrated Encoders - IMEs, PID, precise movement Principles of PID Forward for Distance PID Forward for Target Distance CS: Computing Systems a. Computing Devices b. Human and Computer Partnerships c. Networks d. Services DTC: Digital Tools and Collaboration a. Digital Tools b. Collaboration and Communication c. Research CAS: Computing and Society a. Safety and Security b. Ethics and Laws c. Interpersonal and Societal Impact CT: Computational Thinking a. Abstraction b. Algorithms c. Data d. Programming and Development e. Modeling and Simulation
  13. 13. Lego Bee Bots Lego We Do Finch Robots Ozo bots Sphero Edison Robots Lego EV3 Vex Robotics IQ and EDR Tetrix Robotics 89.95 https://ww w.bee- bot.us/be e-bot/bee- bot.html Bundles: 499.95 189.95 Core Set Lego Educat ion 99.00 https://s tore.bir dbraint echnolo gies.co m/prod uct-p/fr- 1.htm 49.00 or 1,199. 00 kit of 12 https:/ /ozob ot.co m/ste m- educa tion/st 129.99 https:// store.s phero.c om/coll ections /educat ion 49.00 https://mee tedison.co m/product/ edpack1/ 411.95 Core Set EDR 439.00 Classroom Bundle: 5299.99 IQ Super Kit 329.99 Classroom Bundle 3849.99 https://www.tetri xrobotics.com/T ETRIX_MAX Robots and Robot Kit Information Elementary Robots Middle - HS Robots
  14. 14. Inquiry Based Robotics Objectives ❏ Allow students to gain an understanding of what is being taught ❏ layout for students the standards being taught and what they will be assessed on ❏ Rubrics are available in many different forms that teachers can use to provide purpose for students in conjunction with their desire to play ❏ allow students to work towards the idea they will be assessed. ❏ Set up workflow throughout the classroom to make sure that time is not wasted in locating materials, groups are working in their own autonomous spaces, time management processes to ensure that accomplishments are met.
  15. 15. Bee-Bot
  16. 16. Bee-Bot Lesson
  17. 17. Ozobot Sample Lesson
  18. 18. OzoBots in Kindergarten Lesson Teacher showed the kindergarten students an example of an obstacle course and then had them make their own. We let them pick from 4-5 of the materials in the Makerspace to make their course. https://durangoherald.com/articles/208659
  19. 19. Ozobots (Cont’d.)
  20. 20. OzoBlockly Coding Blocks (similar to Scratch)
  21. 21. Lego EV3 ❏ Good for upper elementary, middle and High School ❏ Block programming ❏ Simple to complex ❏ Easily integrated into curriculum
  22. 22. EV3 has Lego Curriculum, numerous books, and Carnegie Mellon Video Trainor
  23. 23. Challenges from Lego Curriculum
  24. 24. EV3 Block based Programming Interface
  25. 25. Sample EV3 Lesson
  26. 26. Text-based program using RobotC for EV3
  27. 27. EV3 Challenges
  28. 28. Robot Club Activity:
  29. 29. Teacher Resources: Resources for teachers: Teacher resources abound online to begin using LEGO Robotics in the classroom to teach all subject matter. Here are a few places to begin to explore: ● https://stanleymoskes-lausd- ca.schoolloop.com/search/search_results?d=x&se arch_term=+robotics. This website offers an extensive list of lessons that teachers can begin with addressing a host of standards. Within the Stanley Mosk Home Page search Robotics Locker to get to this fantastic repertoire of lessons. ● https://education.lego.com/en- us/elementary/intro/science Nice place to begin to gain a better understanding of the potential of robotics to address learning in a classroom. ● Another great source for curriculum ideas is at the Power Point: Yes-you-can-an-easy-way-to-integrate- robotics-into-any-curriculum.pptx. Simply copy and paste this into a Google search and the power point from Georgetown University will appear.
  30. 30. Teacher Resources Tufts Center for Engineering and Outreach http://ceeo.tufts.edu/outreach/LEGOEn gineering.htm https://sites.google.com/site/ceeooutre ach/ https://www.wpi.edu/academics/stem- education-center/professional- development/center http://www.legoengineering.com/ http://robotics.cs.uml.edu/k12educatio n.php
  31. 31. Vex IQ or Vex EDR ❏ Uses RobotC to program ❏ Free curriculum when you purchase kits ❏ Vex IQ - Middle School ❏ Vex EDR - High School
  32. 32. Also available: $499.00 Vex IQ and Vex EDR Video Trainor
  33. 33. Vex EDR Video Trainer Topics
  34. 34. Planning and Using
  35. 35. Vex EDR Unit Topics and Challenges
  36. 36. Scope and Sequence
  37. 37. Vex IQ Programming and Vex EDR Programming Vex IQ Syllabus
  38. 38. Bins purchased at Wal-Mart to store robot and components
  39. 39. Vex EDR Robots: Minefield Challenge
  40. 40. Vex EDR Sentry Challenge using Encoders https://photos.google.com/photo/AF1QipMH0f5H17d rh1U8oE3Dg8ZqD65Z67Vct_4xuGQ_
  41. 41. Mid Term Student Video:
  42. 42. Vex EDR Work Habit Rubric
  43. 43. Engineering Journal Rubric
  44. 44. CoderZ Block-based Robot Simulation
  45. 45. Block Language ● Scratch is taught in our elementary and Middle (6th), so CoderZ provides a familiar block based interface
  46. 46. Tetrix Programming https://www.tetrixr obotics.com/Classr oom/
  47. 47. Additional Curriculum Resources
  48. 48. https://www.techykids.com/comparing-the-different-
  49. 49. We Do Curriculum Grids
  50. 50. Thank you!

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