MC502Integrated Interactivity; Thefuture effects of gaming.By Daniel SouthallStudent Number: 1102352
Effects of gaming “that the makers of „shoot em up‟ videogames are directly responsible for youth guncrime in America, as...
 Henry Jenkins suggest other wise Eight Myths About Video Games Debunked The magic circle : we understand play as dist...
Team Fortress 2 In Team Fortress 2, players are split into two teams, red and blue. They are givendifferent objectives to...
Education in virtual worlds “When the tutor was demonstrating some basic features of the program, [pupils] were totally a...
The Future...(The Gadget Show, 2013)
Positive Exercise Mergence of consoles into one product More social, together in an real sense VR is a great social le...
Negative “But virtual reality has failed to conform to forward-looking visions in one crucial respect. We dont livein the...
Reference ListAng, K.H. & Wang, Q. (2006) A case study of engaging primary school students in learning science byusing Act...
Biocca, F. and M. R. Levy (1995). Communication in the age of virtual reality. Hillsdale, N.J., L. ErlbaumAssociates.Facer...
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Intergrated Interactivity-The future effects of gaming

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Mc502 presentation

  1. 1. MC502Integrated Interactivity; Thefuture effects of gaming.By Daniel SouthallStudent Number: 1102352
  2. 2. Effects of gaming “that the makers of „shoot em up‟ videogames are directly responsible for youth guncrime in America, as they have effectively trained the players to shoot people in real life.(McDougall and O‟Brien, 2007) the generation of young people who play such games are similarly being brutalized andconditioned to be aggressive in their everyday social interactions. (Grossman, 2000)
  3. 3.  Henry Jenkins suggest other wise Eight Myths About Video Games Debunked The magic circle : we understand play as distinctive from reality as entering the "magic circle." The sameaction — say, sweeping a floor — may take on different meanings in play (as in playinghouse) than in reality (housework). Play allows kids to express feelings and impulsesthat have to be carefully held in check in their real-world interactions. (Jenkins.) “before the game starts...it‟s just a board. But once the game begins, everythingchanges. Suddenly the materials represent something.” (Salen, 2004)
  4. 4. Team Fortress 2 In Team Fortress 2, players are split into two teams, red and blue. They are givendifferent objectives to complete, depending on the game type. Capture the Flag King of the Hill Payload Race Control Point Medieval Mode Mann vs. Machine Special Delivery Territorial Control Payload Arena when playing TF2, as people tend to buddy up, use each other and work as a team toachieve victory. Players realise that teaming up, or using the team more efficiently is thekey, such as in King of the Hill.
  5. 5. Education in virtual worlds “When the tutor was demonstrating some basic features of the program, [pupils] were totally attracted,engrossed, and also very quiet... There were also improvements in attendance for the classes, with100% attendance, and there were notable improvements in engagement” (de Freitas, 2009) „I prefer to study Science in this way than the normal traditional classroom teaching‟” (Ang & Wang,2006: 8, 9) “Addressing the digital divide from the student perspective means ensuring access to technology for all” (The Committee of Inquiry 2009, p. 6) “digital natives have a different style of learning; they crave interactivity; they value graphics...they seedigital immigrants as speaking a different, outdated language.” (Prensky, 2001)
  6. 6. The Future...(The Gadget Show, 2013)
  7. 7. Positive Exercise Mergence of consoles into one product More social, together in an real sense VR is a great social leveller, it may find a common ground across differences in age,culture, and linguistic orientation (Biocca and Levy 1995) people will be drawn together by similar interests instead of purely by geographiclocation (Biocca and Levy 1995) “With VR, youre limiting yourself to what your body can actually do.” (Handrahan, 2012)
  8. 8. Negative “But virtual reality has failed to conform to forward-looking visions in one crucial respect. We dont livein the Matrix, but in the matrices.” (Johnson, 2006) “lack of equality of access to digital technologies. This included issues of digital divides within countriesand between countries, and included concerns for groups who do not wish to engage with technologyat all”. (Facer. 2009, P. 198) “The socio-technical developments described above are heavily reliant upon continued energy supply,upon continued access to the mineral resources and raw materials needed to make digitaltechnologies... Significant energy disruptions, a failure of the technology industry to recognise the needfor more environmentally sustainable practices and a reduction in the supply of raw materials all posethreats to the intensification of the digital landscape. Alternatively, the emergence of new healthconcerns or a major privacy and security failure in online environments, could equally lead to massivepublic resistance to further socio-technical developments”. (Facer. 2009, P.242)
  9. 9. Reference ListAng, K.H. & Wang, Q. (2006) A case study of engaging primary school students in learning science byusing Active Worlds. Proceedings of the First International LAMS Conference 2006: Designing theFuture of Learning, Sydney, Australia.de Freitas (2009) Serious Virtual Worlds: A scoping study. Bristol: Joint Information Systems Committee[online]. Available at: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/publications/seriousvirtualworldsv1.pdf(Accessed: 04/05/2013).Grossman, David. "Teaching Kids to Kill." Phi Kappa Phi National Forum 2000.http://www.killology.org/article_teachkid.htmJenkins, H. (no date) Reality Bytes: Eight Myths About Video Games Debunked. Available at:http://www.pbs.org/kcts/videogamerevolution/impact/myths.html (Accessed: <08/04/2013>).McDougall, J and O‟Brien, W (2007) Studying Videogames. Abingdon: Auteur (chapter 2)Prensky, M. (2001) On the Horizon: Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants.MCB University, vol.9, October2001 [online]. Available at http://www.marcprensky.com/writing/prensky%20-%20digital%20natives,%20digital%20immigrants%20-%20part1.pdf (Accessed: 06/05/2013)The Committee of Inquiry (2009) Higher Education in a Web 2.0 World: Report of an independentCommittee of Inquiry into the impact on higher education of students’ widespread use of Web 2.0technologies. {online]. Available at: http://www.moodle2.newman.ac.uk (Accessed: 06/05/2013)
  10. 10. Biocca, F. and M. R. Levy (1995). Communication in the age of virtual reality. Hillsdale, N.J., L. ErlbaumAssociates.Facer, K (2009). Educational, social and technological futures: a report from the Beyond Current HorizonsProgramme [online]. Beyond Current Horizons, June 2009 (Cited 11th May 2013). Available at:http://www.beyondcurrenthorizons.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/final-report-20092.pdfHandrahan, M. (2012) Games Industry International: Oculus Rift and the Virtual Reality Revolution [online].London. Updated Tues 18th December 2012 [accessed 11th May 2013]. Available from: <http://www.gamesindustry.biz/articles/2012-12-18-oculus-rift-and-the-virtual-reality-revolution>Johnson, B (2006) Wired: When Virtual Worlds Collide [online]. Issue 14.04, Wired.com, Updated April2006 [Cited 11th May 2013] Available at: http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/14.04/collide.htmlThe Gadget Show: Possible Future Technology Changes? Channel 5 Broadcasting Ltd, London. Cited 9thMay 2013. http://moodle2.newman.ac.uk

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