How to write an e-mail

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How to write an e-mail

  1. 1. Communications Studies and Personal Development - Damian Gordon - How to write an e-mail
  2. 2. How to write an e-mail Writing e-mails is a skill It takes practice With email, you can't assume anything about a sender's location, time, frame of mind, profession, interests, or future value to you. This means, among other things, that you need to be very, very careful about giving your receivers some context.
  3. 3. How to write an e-mail Subject Lines Need help with timetable Re: Need help with timetable Fwd: Need help with timetable URGENT: Need help with timetable REQ: Need help with timetable FYI: Need help with timetable
  4. 4. How to write an e-mail Mr./Ms. [ Full name ], [Body of e-mail]. Regards, Your name Student Number DT211/1
  5. 5. How to write an e-mail Quoting an e-mail > I am e-mailing you to request if you > you have finished it yes
  6. 6. How to write an e-mail Change pronouns > I am e-mailing you to request if you > you have finished [the assignment] yes
  7. 7. How to write an e-mail Short Paragraphs Frequently email messages will be read in a document window with scrollbars. While scrollbars are nice, it makes it harder to visually track long paragraphs. Consider breaking up your paragraphs to only a few sentences apiece.
  8. 8. How to write an e-mail Line Length Some mail clients do not automatically wrap (adjust what words go on what line). This means that if there is a mismatch between your client's and your correspondent's in how they wrap lines, your correspondent may end up with a message that looks messy.
  9. 9. How to write an e-mail Line Length You should try to keep your lines under sixty characters long. This is to leave a little room for the indentation or quote marks your correspondents may want if they need to quote pieces of your message in their replies.
  10. 10. How to write an e-mail Smileys A facial gestures can be represented with what is called a "smiley": a textual drawing of a facial expression. The most common are; :-) ;-) :-(
  11. 11. How to write an e-mail Language The biggest status cue is your competence with the language.
  12. 12. How to write an e-mail Language If you have lots of misspellings, your subjects do not agree with your verbs, or you use the wrong word, people may assume that you are uneducated. From that, they may infer that you are not very clever. It doesn't matter that the correlation between language ability and intelligence is weak (especially among non-native speakers); lots of people will make that inference anyway.
  13. 13. How to write an e-mail Language Furthermore, some people are literally insulted by getting email with errors, especially typographical errors. They feel that it is disrespectful to send email with blatant errors. (Note that you can use this to your advantage. If you want to flaunt your superior status, you can insert some typos deliberately.)
  14. 14. How to write an e-mail Acronyms BTW - By The Way FYI - For Your Information IMHO - In My Humble/Honest Opinion RTFM - Read The Manual ("Manual" here refers to any documentation) LOL - [I] Laughed Out Loud [at what you wrote] RSN - Real Soon Now ROTFL - [I am] Rolling On The Floor Laughing [at what you wrote] These are less common, but show up occasionally: TTFN - Ta-Ta For Now TIA - Thanks In Advance (also sometimes written advTHANKSance)

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