Facts About Kids Nutrition

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Facts About Kids Nutrition

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Facts About Kids Nutrition

  1. 1.
  2. 2. Summary of slides<br />Slide 3: Methodology<br />Slide 4-7: Total daily dietary energy intake of Australian children<br />Slide 8: Proportion (%) of total dietary energy intake contributed by fruit products and dishes<br />Slide 9: Mean intake of fruit products and dishes<br />Slide 10: Proportion (%) of total dietary energy intake contributed by vegetable products and dishes<br />Slide 11: Mean intake of vegetable products and dishes<br />Slide 12: Proportion (%) of total dietary energy intake contributed by milk products and dishes<br />Slide 13: Mean intake of milk products and dishes<br />Slide 14: Proportion (%) of total dietary energy intake contributed by non-alcoholic beverages<br />Slide 15: Mean intake of non-alcoholic beverages<br />Slide 16: Adequacy of intake of iron, vitamin C and calcium<br />Slide 17: Meeting the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) for iron, vitamin C and calcium<br />Slide 18: Calcium intake<br />Slide 19: Meeting the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) for calcium<br />Slide 20-22: Average calcium intake compared to Estimated Average Requirement (EAR)<br />Slide 23: Key points about calcium<br />Slide 24: Please contact us for more information<br />
  3. 3. Methodology<br />Data collection period:<br />February to August 2007.<br />Survey sample:<br />4,487 children aged 2-16 years from across Australia.<br />Dietary measurement method:<br />24 hour dietary recall on two occasions - once by computer assisted personal interview, followed 7 to 21 days later by computer assisted telephone interview.<br />
  4. 4. Total daily dietary energy intake of Australian children(2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  5. 5. Total daily dietary energy intake of Australian children(2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  6. 6. Total daily dietary energy intake of Australian children(2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  7. 7. Total daily dietary energy intake of Australian children(2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  8. 8. Proportion (%) of total dietary energy intake contributed by fruit products and dishes(2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  9. 9. Mean intake of fruit products and dishes(2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  10. 10. Proportion (%) of total dietary energy intake contributed by vegetable products and dishes (2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  11. 11. Mean intake of vegetable products and dishes(2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  12. 12. Proportion (%) of total dietary energy intake contributed by milk products and dishes(2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  13. 13. Mean intake of milk products and dishes (2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  14. 14. Proportion (%) of total dietary energy intake contributed by non-alcoholic beverages (2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  15. 15. Mean intake of non-alcoholic beverages (2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  16. 16.
  17. 17. Meeting the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) for Iron, Vitamin C and Calcium(2007 Children’s Survey) <br />
  18. 18.
  19. 19. Meeting the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) for Calcium(2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  20. 20. Average Calcium intake compared to Estimated Average Requirement (EAR)(2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  21. 21. Average Calcium intake compared to Estimated Average Requirement (EAR)(2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  22. 22. Average Calcium intake compared to Estimated Average Requirement (EAR)(2007 Children’s Survey)<br />
  23. 23. Key points about Calcium<br />From the 2007 Children’s Survey, calcium is the most poorly consumed of the<br />nutrients measured in relation to requirements for Australian children. <br />The recommended dietary intake for calcium – the reference intake for individuals –<br />is 40% greater than the EAR for 4 to 8 year olds and about 25% greater for 9 to 16<br />year olds.<br />Adolescence is a period of rapid skeletal growth during which almost half of adult<br />bone mass is acquired. Genetic factors influence an individuals peak bone mass,<br />but lifestyle practices such as exercise and adequate calcium are also important <br />And modifiable. <br />Under-consumption of calcium may eventually lead to achievement of a lower peak<br />bone mass in early adult life than would otherwise be the case. <br />Dairy foods provide most of the calcium in the diet of Australian children – improving<br />the calcium intake of Australian children is most easily achieved by an increase in<br />their daily intake of calcium rich dairy foods.<br />

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