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DS BE - DOCTORAL SEMINAR ON SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT _ 21ST MAY 
Exploring Integrated design 
proc...
Thesubject 
Developing a context-specific 
and scale-sensitive Integrated 
Design Process (IDP) for 
sustainable urbanism ...
The broader framework of developing IDP for SU owes: 
• Primarily existing urban design methods and tools are 
not investi...
Main questions 
How to identify and link the main structural components of the 
morphology of urban open spaces that have ...
A 
Inspection of 
basics 
B 
Analysis of 
Issue 
Context 
C 
Design 
Process 
Framework 
D 
Guideline 
and 
recommenda 
ti...
Thestateoftheart
Why Integrated Design? 
The fundamental process of integrated design is the search for synergies. 
Synergistic strategies ...
IDPDefinitions 
ƒ IDP has been seen as the process by which multi-disciplinary building design 
teams form early and work ...
IDP at the building scale level 
Linearity, Iteration, Integration 
ƒ Increasing pressure on building developers and 
desi...
IDP at the urban scale level 
Overlapping between spatial scales and analytical tools, 
source: S. Hermand 2013 
Our inten...
Focus on the 3 integrated design strategies 
Urban Form Design 
Urban form is often considered as resulting from the build...
Why Urban Form ? 
A. Cluzet, (2012) 
“Oslo produces ten times less greenhouse gas 
emissions per capita than Melbourne, de...
URBAN 
FORM 
What it is What it’s useful for How it’s done 
Urban 
Morphology 
Figure-ground 
mapping 
Typological 
analys...
BIOCLIMATISM 
What it is What it’s useful for How it’s done 
Bioclimatic 
Design 
Reconfiguration of the 
relationship bet...
What it is What it’s useful for How it’s done 
LCA Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) 
is a highly detailed method to 
evaluate a...
Why Brussels? 
+ 170 000 by 2020 
Area : 160 Km2 
New constructions, 
Renovation 
Need of densification 
Find new urban fo...
A 
Inspection 
of basics 
B 
Analysis of 
Issue 
Context 
C 
Design 
Process 
Framework 
D 
Guideline 
and 
recommen 
dati...
Case study Tour  Taxis 
Localisation of TourTaxis (adapted from URBIS) 
3D view of the TourTaxis project source: Master 
P...
Summary 
Ÿ Ambition: 
Improving knowledge about the relationship between 
Urban form, energy and bioclimatism in order to ...
Targets 
1. Obtain qualitative and quantitative results that characterize the 
nature of the relationship between urban op...
Thank you!
A 
Inspection 
of basics 
B 
Analysis of 
Issue 
Context 
C 
Design 
Process 
Framework 
D 
Guideline 
and 
recommen 
dati...
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Exploring Integrated Design Process for Sustainable Urbanism

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Exploring Integrated Design Process for Sustainable Urbanism

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Exploring Integrated Design Process for Sustainable Urbanism

  1. 1. DS BE - DOCTORAL SEMINAR ON SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT _ 21ST MAY Exploring Integrated design process for sustainable urbanism PhD student: Séverine Hermand severine.hermand@ulb.ac.be Supervisor : Philippe Bouillard & Ahmed Z. Khan B U I L D I N G , ARC H I T EC T U R E AND TOWN P L A N N I N G
  2. 2. Thesubject Developing a context-specific and scale-sensitive Integrated Design Process (IDP) for sustainable urbanism (SU) through triangulated analysis of urban form (including infrastructure), bioclimatism and energy efficiency in the context of Brussels Capital Region (BCR) URBAN FORM DESIGN BIOCLIMATISM ENERGY
  3. 3. The broader framework of developing IDP for SU owes: • Primarily existing urban design methods and tools are not investigated enough from an integrated perspective • Secondly, most of the existing sustainability assessment systems are useful tools for an IDP at the building scale
  4. 4. Main questions How to identify and link the main structural components of the morphology of urban open spaces that have an impact on energy consumption of the building surrounding? • What is the role of a morphological study of open spaces in relation to the energetic needs? • How can the European capital, Brussels, address this? • What are the main tools at our disposal to perform quantitative and qualitative analysis of energetic effects of open spaces on their built environment?
  5. 5. A Inspection of basics B Analysis of Issue Context C Design Process Framework D Guideline and recommenda tion Neighborhood District City Scale analysis Interrelation: Integrated design strategies Generic Process Key Issues and recommendations Investigation of Methods / Tools Case studies Framework Method of work
  6. 6. Thestateoftheart
  7. 7. Why Integrated Design? The fundamental process of integrated design is the search for synergies. Synergistic strategies create benefits greater than the sum of the individual design decisions. 2006 Energy Studies in Buildings Laboratory, University of Oregon, and Konstrukt
  8. 8. IDPDefinitions ƒ IDP has been seen as the process by which multi-disciplinary building design teams form early and work together throughout the project schedule. ƒ Specific definition of the IDP is a discovery process optimizing the elements that comprise all building projects and their interrelationships across increasingly larger fields in the service of efficient and effective use of resources. ƒ The synthesis of climate, use, loads, and systems resulting in a comfortable and productive environment and a building that is more energy-efficient than current best practices ƒ A term that characterizes what architects and architecture students do when they incorporate the energy, site and climate, construction, programmatic, regulatory, economic and social aspects of a project as primary parameters in the design
  9. 9. IDP at the building scale level Linearity, Iteration, Integration ƒ Increasing pressure on building developers and designers caused by a rapidly changing market ƒ Adaptability and flexibility during entire life-cycle ƒ High energy performance expectations ƒ Increasing requirements caused by high complexity ƒ A steadily growing consciousness about the environment
  10. 10. IDP at the urban scale level Overlapping between spatial scales and analytical tools, source: S. Hermand 2013 Our intention behind the choice and the overlapping of the structural indicators is to keep the complexity of the city’s structure while structuring it in order to understand the mechanisms. Modelling the interaction between all these indicators can be a way to understand and assess the energy performances of an urban fabric.
  11. 11. Focus on the 3 integrated design strategies Urban Form Design Urban form is often considered as resulting from the build construction. View it instead as a resource “An efficient fabric alone can reduce energy consumption and carbon emissions by a factor of 2” (Salat 2011) Energy The analysis of energy is used to model the interaction between the energy flow, incomes and outcomes Bioclimatism Employing bioclimatism design strategy to enhance energy performance. URBAN FORM DESIGN BIOCLIMATISM ENERGY Needs Needs Consideration of use, schedule, and comfort criteria as malleable
  12. 12. Why Urban Form ? A. Cluzet, (2012) “Oslo produces ten times less greenhouse gas emissions per capita than Melbourne, despite comparable level of life” S. Salat, (2011) ”An efficient fabric alone can reduce energy consumption and carbon emissions by a factor of 2” Climate Urban Form Building physics (architecture, materials) Systems (heating/cooling systems) Occupans’ behaviour Ÿ Degree of freedom seems to be available in the urban design Ÿ This means that Urban Morphology has the potential to halve a city’s energy and carbon emissions
  13. 13. URBAN FORM What it is What it’s useful for How it’s done Urban Morphology Figure-ground mapping Typological analysis Materials and components analysis Analysis techniques used to study the present and past historical patterns of urban structure, form, land use and patterns. Defining urban patterns and characteristics that create a unique sense of place. It helps in the appraisal of successful and unsuccessful urban form, and can examine the processes that shaped past change, or features that persist in the present urban fabric. Characteristics of an urban area, such as its buildings, lots, blocks, street patterns, open space, land-use activities and building details, are recorded, measured, mapped and analyzed using existing and/or historical information. Tissue Analysis Urban tissue A technique that overlays a known and understood scale plan or aerial photograph of existing buildings, lots, blocks and street patterns onto a vacant site as a rapid means of generating design options. Rapid generation of initial design options for sites and neighborhoods that promote informed design discussion Aerial photographs or plans of existing, known and understood buildings, lots, blocks and street patterns are manipulated and modified to achieve a best fit or a series of different options on a vacant site or neighborhood. Space Syntax Analysis Set of theories and techniques that analyze how street networks are connected through mapping the spatial configurations and accessibility of open spaces and street patterns. Explaining why certain streets and spaces are more heavily used than others. Space syntax maps the relative accessibility of parts of a site, neighborhood or city and identifies the areas where improvements in access can be made. The technique determines the degree of integration or segregation of streets and other spaces within a neighborhood, town or city, by studying the ‘axial lines’ and ‘convex spaces’ Adaptedfrom,UrbanDesignToolkit,ThirdEdition,theMinistryfortheEnvironment,Manatü Mö Te Taiao,2006
  14. 14. BIOCLIMATISM What it is What it’s useful for How it’s done Bioclimatic Design Reconfiguration of the relationship between, climatic conditions of a specific context, the site and the build environment Defining a bioclimatic design strategy is useful to provide visual and thermal comfort, minimizing resource and energy use are central. In a such design configuration, the knowledge and understanding of climate (sun, and solar geometry, air and temperature, wind and humidity..), site bio-configurations (topography, orientation, soil, water, vegetation, building and street morphology…) Material properties and passive systems and design strategies
  15. 15. What it is What it’s useful for How it’s done LCA Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a highly detailed method to evaluate all environmental impacts of a product during its complete life cycle A Life Cycle Assessment of a product avoids a “narrow outlook” and ensures the best overview of your product’s supply chain, to identify the existing environmental hotspots. The complete assessment is not only about CO2, but rather about all environmental impacts for which researchers have developed methods. The procedure has been normalized in the ISO 14040 and ISO 14044 standards and includes interdependent steps MFA Material flow analysis (MFA) is a systematic assessment of the flows and stocks of materials within a system defined in space and time. Brunner and Rechberger, 2004 • Delineate system of material flows and stocks • Reduce system complexity while maintaining basis for decision-making • Assess relevant flows and stocks quantitatively, checking mass balance, sensitivities, and uncertainties • Present system results in reproducible, understandable, transparent fashion • Use results as a basis for managing resources, the environment, and wastes Eg: The software STAN (Software for Substance Flow Analysis) ENERGY
  16. 16. Why Brussels? + 170 000 by 2020 Area : 160 Km2 New constructions, Renovation Need of densification Find new urban form 50% Open space Microclimates Flexibility in urban fabric
  17. 17. A Inspection of basics B Analysis of Issue Context C Design Process Framework D Guideline and recommen dation Neighborhood District City Scale analysis Interrelation: Integrated design strategies Generic Process Key Issues and recommendations Investigation of Methods / Tools Case studies Framework Method of work
  18. 18. Case study Tour Taxis Localisation of TourTaxis (adapted from URBIS) 3D view of the TourTaxis project source: Master Plan TourTaxis, 2009 • Area: 45ha • Promotion of the social mix, the urban mix, the connectivity of the site to public transport • The construction of a public area: the biggest public park since the 19th century in Brussels- Capital Region. In total 45% of the total space of the area will be dedicated to the park (20ha)
  19. 19. Summary Ÿ Ambition: Improving knowledge about the relationship between Urban form, energy and bioclimatism in order to develop an IDP framework for the practitioners Ÿ First relation between urban form energy and bioclimatism: Degree of freedom seems to be available in the urban design Urban Morphology has the potential to halve a city’s energy and carbon emissions Ÿ Study of the urban form: The city has been seems as complex adaptive systems of void and solid areas
  20. 20. Targets 1. Obtain qualitative and quantitative results that characterize the nature of the relationship between urban open space and energy issues 2. Show how the morphology of the urban open space (square, street, park, inside blocks ...) impact the energy consumption of the buildings surrounding and how full and empty interact 3. Create an IDP framework for decision support in the design or management of energy efficient urban projects in their entirety
  21. 21. Thank you!
  22. 22. A Inspection of basics B Analysis of Issue Context C Design Process Framework D Guideline and recommen dation Neighborhood District City Scale analysis Interrelation: Integrated design strategies Generic Process Key Issues and recommendations Investigation of Methods / Tools Case studies Framework Method of work

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