665 Session7-autonomy&immersion-s13

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LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy
Spring 2013
Dr. Diane Nahl
University of Hawaii
Library & Information Science Program

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  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy The affective domain governs behavior through myriad affections, including: values, attitudes, likes & dislikes, preferences, interests, self-confidence degree of commitment , sense of accomplishment, conflict, voluntary choice, priorities, goal setting, happiness, joy, frustration, desire for mastery, etc.
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy
  • LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy
  • 665 Session7-autonomy&immersion-s13

    1. 1. Building in Learner Autonomy & Immersion LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Spring 2013 Dr. Diane NahlUniversity of Hawaii, Library & Information Science Program
    2. 2. Building-in Learner Autonomy  Learner choices enhance motivation  Creating a hierarchy of important activities, prioritizing the work Learners organize their projects independently Instructors provide frequent input and feedback Learners decide how to proceed to the goal  Enjoying the freedom to choose Learners make decisions within frameworks of options Learners determine their own options  Social networking in team projects  Self-determination builds confidence Independence and collaboration interact as in the workplaceLIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013 2
    3. 3. Building-in Learner Autonomy  Learner choices increase anxiety in some  Greater confidence vs. greater uncertainty Too many choices can be overwhelming Choice builds confidence  Create support for decision making Provide scaffolding to support learners in taking control Design small steps in taking control that lead to autonomy  Greater satisfaction with instruction Learners become confident in stages With input from instructors learners gain confidence Learners experience empowerment through instructionLIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013 3
    4. 4. Building-in Learner Autonomy  Types of autonomy  Choice of topic  Choice of whether to change a Facebook setting or to use Google Scholar  Choice of search strategy  Choice of items from a search deemed relevant according to established criteria  Choice in the order or organization of information, activity, or content  Choice of presentation formats  Choice of team leader and team roles and responsibilities  Etc.LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013 4
    5. 5. Immersive Learning Learners actively experiencing a real life social context  Creating something others will actually use  Acquiring attitudes, knowledge, and skills that can be readily applied in life, at work, in school and in professional settings  Working within immersive settings with real participants  Participating in actual and live social settings (online, virtual world, and/or physical) Immersive Formats in Education  Internships, Field Work, Service Learning, Student Teaching, Shadowing a Professional, etc.LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013 5
    6. 6. Exercise: Building-in Learner Autonomy Consider these questions: 1. In what ways is autonomy built into LIS 665? How has autonomy affected your learning? 2. In what ways is immersive learning built into LIS 665? How has immersion affected your learning? Discuss with your seat neighbor then write your thoughts in the 665 Google Group.LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013 6
    7. 7. Exercise: Map Activities to ACS Outcomes Select one active learning exercise and map it onto your ACS Outcomes to show how it demonstrates students have learned from your lesson.  Map a draft Active Learning Exercise to your PIs and ACS Outcomes.  Make sure it incorporates Active Learning Principles (pp. 18-19)  Identify the evidence it will produce to demonstrate students have learned new knowledge and skills, attitude change, or completed an assignment.  SAOAC includes criteria, outcome/evidence measures (pp. 9 & 12)  Audit all exercises to ensure they map to all of your ACS Outcomes. LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Literacy Nahl Spring 2013 7
    8. 8. Exercise: Usability Testing of Active Learning Exercises Usability testing cross-team match-ups (Share documents & materials now)  Identity Team 1 (Driving) Sharrese with Google Team 4 (Driving) DeHanza & Arianna  Identity Team 1 (Driving) online Liz & Jerome with Google Team 4 (Driving) Susan  Identity Team 2 (Marriage) Kapena & Rachel with Google Team 5 (Cyber Psychology) Rita & Lee  Identity Team 3 (Cyber Psychology) Roberta, Zoia & Adam with Google Team 5 (Cyber Psychology) AlexLIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013 8
    9. 9. Exercise: Usability Testing of Active Learning Exercises  Teams test your actual activities with members from another Team. 1. Select one exercise to test. 2. Introduce it as you would online to the psychology class. 3. Avoid chat during the test, really act as if these are your students and test it for real, stay in character. 4. Run through the procedures you planned. 5. Team members observe the usability test. 6. Provide feedback for revising the activity. 7. Repeat with another activity until all are tested.  Revise the exercises based on reviews and discussion.LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013 9
    10. 10. Next Week  Emmons et al.; Mackey et al.  Final Drafts of Unit Instructional Sequence, Active Learning Exercises, Test and Evaluation Items for all Teams  Make sure you have Answer Keys identifying correct, best or ideal responses for all activity tasks.LIS 665 Teaching Information Technology Literacy Nahl 2013 10

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