Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
6/16/2015
1
Dominick Maino, OD, MEd, FAAO, FCOVD‐A 
Moderator
Featuring the Best of AOA's 2015 Poster Presentations
Jun‐27...
6/16/2015
2
Poster Session
My Thanks to the AOA Abstract Review Committee
William McAllister, Elizabeth Wyles, Sunny Sande...
6/16/2015
3
Facts, cont.
• Symptoms:
• Typically asymptomatic
• Transient visual obscurations (8.3%)
• Possible VF defects...
6/16/2015
4
Patient 1:  ONH OD Patient 1:  ONH OS
Patient 1:  Red‐free ONH OD Patient 1:  Red‐free ONH OS
Patient 1:  B‐sc...
6/16/2015
5
Patient 1:  OCT OD, OS
Patient 1, cont. 
•Assessment:
• 1. Buried ONH drusen OU
•Plan:
• 1. Mother educated on...
6/16/2015
6
Patient 2:  ONH OD, OS
Patient 2:  B‐scan OD, OS
Patient 2:  B‐scan OD, OS
Patient 2:  
HVF OD, OS
Patient 2: ...
6/16/2015
7
Patient 3
TT – 14 year old AA female
• CC: Blur at distance with habitual Rx for 1 month
• POcHx/PMHx: Pt. had...
6/16/2015
8
Patient 3:  Red‐free ONH OS Patient 3:  B‐scan OD
Patient 3:  B‐scan OS
Patient 3:  
HVF OD, 
OS 
Patient 3:  ...
6/16/2015
9
Patient 4 
DB – 25 year old Hispanic female
• CC: Annual examination
• POcHx: h/o pseudotumor cerebri diagnose...
6/16/2015
10
Patient 4:  B‐scan OS  Patient 
4:  HVF
OD, OS
Patient 4:  OCT OD, OS 
Patient 4, cont. 
•Assessment
•1. ONH ...
6/16/2015
11
Patient 5, cont. 
• Anterior Seg.: Unremarkable
• IOP: 14 mmHg OD, OS (Goldmann)
• Posterior Seg.:
•ONH OD, O...
6/16/2015
12
Patient 5:  B‐scan OD, OS
Patient 5:  OCT OD, OS
Patient 5, cont. 
•Assessment
•1. ONH drusen OU with vessel ...
6/16/2015
13
Questions? Questions?
1a) Which is more common with optic disc drusen‐‐visual acuity 
impairment or visual fi...
6/16/2015
14
• Used on a liquid‐crystal‐display (LCD) 
monitor
• Manipulation of contrast level with 
different optotype s...
6/16/2015
15
•Low contrast Bailey‐Lovie logMAR: 
• ‐0.006 (+/‐ 0.11) 
• VA equivalent: 20/19.725
•Harris equivalent logMAR...
6/16/2015
16
Questions?
1. What benefits does the Harris chart have over other 
standard contrast charts?
2. Is it commerc...
6/16/2015
17
External Exam OD OS
Adnexa Normal Normal
Lids Normal Normal
Conjunctiva Clear Clear
Cornea Clear Clear
Anteri...
6/16/2015
18
Current Considerations
1) OCT for patients with known RP
2) Also VF – Goldmann or Octopus – recommended at le...
6/16/2015
19
Bibliography
1) Ryan S, Schachat A, Wilkinson C, Hinton D, Sadda S, Wiedemann P. Retina. Elsevier 
Health Sci...
6/16/2015
20
OD OS
Differential Diagnoses
 Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy
 Nonarteritic
 Arteritic
 Optic neuritis...
6/16/2015
21
NA‐AION
• Age 61 ± 12
• (+) Disc Hemes
• Altitudinal VF loss
• Minimal color loss
• Painless
• Disc at risk
•...
6/16/2015
22
LABS and CXR
Lab Test Value √ / X
Syphilis Screen (EIA) Non‐reactive √
Diabetes
Glucose  101 √
HbA1c 5.4 √
Li...
6/16/2015
23
Initial visit 4 months later
Initial visit 4 months later
Summary
• Be suspicious of GCA
• Differentials in a...
6/16/2015
24
Questions?
1‐ What is the chance of a recurrence of NAION 
in the fellow eye?
2‐ How often does a visual fiel...
6/16/2015
25
145 146
147
Patient Responses 
• Easier to tell the difference
• High tech 
• Less strain
• Feels more accura...
6/16/2015
26
70%
27%
3%
30 Patients Study (Right Eye)  
The Difference in Spherical Equivalence Between Binocular 
Balance...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

060915 current research that you should incorporate into your

529 views

Published on

Current Research that You Should Incorporate into Your Mode of Practice Now!

Dominick Maino, OD, MEd, FAAO, FCOVD‐A
Moderator
Featuring the Best of AOA's 2015 Poster Presentations
Jun‐27‐2015 8:00AM ‐ 10:00AM

Optic Nerve Head Drusen: A Myriad of Presentations
Jennifer L. Jones, Sylvia E. Sparrow, Christina Grosshans

Validation Study of New LCD‐Based Contrast Sensitivity Testing Method
Sarah Henderson, Jeung H Kim, Paul Harris

Bilateral Cystoid Macular Edema in Retinitis Pigmentosa and its Management
Lindsay T. Gibney

An ODE to Optic Disc Edema
Kelli Theisen

Is Binocular Balancing with Subjective Refraction a thing of the Past?
David Geffen

Optometry's Meeting 2015
Seattle, Washington

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

060915 current research that you should incorporate into your

  1. 1. 6/16/2015 1 Dominick Maino, OD, MEd, FAAO, FCOVD‐A  Moderator Featuring the Best of AOA's 2015 Poster Presentations Jun‐27‐2015   8:00AM ‐ 10:00AM 3015 Current Research that You Should Incorporate into Your Mode of Practice Now! Optic Nerve Head Drusen: A Myriad of Presentations Jennifer L. Jones, Sylvia E. Sparrow, Christina Grosshans Validation Study of New LCD‐Based Contrast Sensitivity Testing Method Sarah Henderson, Jeung H Kim, Paul Harris Bilateral Cystoid Macular Edema in Retinitis Pigmentosa and its Management Lindsay T. Gibney An ODE to Optic Disc Edema Kelli Theisen Is Binocular Balancing with Subjective Refraction a thing of the Past? David Geffen Cochrane Reviews http://www.cochrane.org/ … a global independent network of  researchers, professionals,  patients, carers, and people  interested in health…  Cotter SA, Cyert LA, Miller JM, Quinn GE; National Expert  Panel to the National Center for Children’s Vision and Eye  Health. Vision screening for children 36 to <72 months:  recommended practices. Optom Vis Sci. 2015 Jan;92(1):6‐ 16.  Clinician’s View of Researchers Researcher’s view of Clinicians
  2. 2. 6/16/2015 2 Poster Session My Thanks to the AOA Abstract Review Committee William McAllister, Elizabeth Wyles, Sunny Sanders,              Sarah Hinkley, Christine Allison, Jennifer Harthan, Aurora Denial 90 posters submitted; 50 Posters accepted Criteria for acceptance similar to those used by other well  respected organizations (clinical aspects emphasized)  Reasons for non‐acceptance:  Did not follow instructions Data does not support conclusions Not unique Poster Session Please submit Case reports, Case series, Clinical research, etc. in all areas  of optometry for 2016 when the call for abstracts goes out! Informational Posters Accepted  (These also need to be well done and  cannot be a sales pitch for a particular product or service) The committee judged these posters to be notable and worthy to be  highlighted in this fashion Questions welcome at the end of each of today’s presentations Optic Nerve Head Drusen: A Myriad of Presentations Jennifer L. Jones, Sylvia E. Sparrow, Christina Grosshans Validation Study of New LCD‐Based Contrast Sensitivity Testing Method Sarah Henderson, Jeung H Kim, Paul Harris Bilateral Cystoid Macular Edema in Retinitis Pigmentosa and its  Management Lindsay T. Gibney An ODE to Optic Disc Edema Kelli Theisen Is Binocular Balancing with Subjective Refraction a thing of the Past? David Geffen Optic Nerve Head Drusen: A Myriad of Presentations Jennifer L. Jones, O.D. Sylvia E. Sparrow, O.D., F.A.A.O. Christina Grosshans, O.D. Facts about optic nerve head drusen (ONHD)  • Concretions of calcium, nucleic and amino acids,  mucopolysaccharides, and sometimes iron • Contained within nerve above lamina cribrosa and below Bruch’s  membrane • ONHD are dynamic: they enlarge slowly throughout a person’s life •*May* be “buried” in young patients (closer to  lamina cribrosa) Facts, cont.  • Epidemiology: • 1% of general population • More common in Caucasian and female patients • Autosomal dominant with incomplete penetrance • Associated conditions: pseudoxanthoma elasticum, RP, angioid streaks • Signs: • 75‐85% bilateral • Yellowish deposits on/around ONH • ONH margins may be distorted and indistinct • Loss of cup
  3. 3. 6/16/2015 3 Facts, cont. • Symptoms: • Typically asymptomatic • Transient visual obscurations (8.3%) • Possible VF defects (enlarged blind spot, arcuate scotoma, and peripheral  defects) • *Possible* VA loss in association with juxtapapillary CNV • Complications: • As drusen enlarge, nerve fibers and vascular supply may be compressed,   leading to VF defects, vascular occlusion, and hemorrhage • Ex: Retinal vein occlusion, retinal artery occlusion (typically in conjunction with systemic  HTN, migraines, oral contraceptive use), and AION Facts, cont. • Treatment: • None (for drusen itself) • Monitor with VF, OCT, IOP check • If VF defect is present, may lower IOP with topical  medications to prevent progression • If CNV is present, treatment may be needed if central  acuity is threatened Clinical differences between papilledema and ONHD Papilledema ONHD ONH appearance Hyperemic, ill‐defined Lumpy bumpy, ill‐defined SVP Varies Varies Peripapillary lesions CWS, hemes, venous congestion Abnormal retinal vasculature VA impairment Affected in later stages Rare VF defects Likely* Possible* Systemic symptoms Headache, nausea, vomiting Absent ONH calcification Absent Detected with imaging ONH autofluorescence Absent Present especially if superficial J Clin Neurol.  2012 Jun; 8(2):  151–154.  Patient 1 MT – 5 year old Caucasian female • CC: Follow‐up on buried ONHD OU diagnosed 3  months prior • POcHx: Accommodative esotropia • PMHx: Unremarkable • Height/Weight:  3’2”, 45 lbs. • Medications: None reported • Allergies: NKDA Patient 1, cont. •VA cc: 20/25+2 OD, 20/25+2 OS with +4.50 sph  OD, OS •Color: “Normal” OD, OS  • Waggoner method  •EOMs: FROM OU • (‐)pain, (‐)diplopia •CVF: FTFC OD, OS •PERRL (‐)APD OD, OS Patient 1, cont. •Anterior Seg.: Unremarkable OD, OS •IOP: 17 mmHg OD, 16 mmHg OS (Icare) •Posterior Seg.:  • ONH OD, OS: “lumpy” appearance, well perfused,  no obscuration of vessels at margins • C/D ratio: 0.10R OD, OS • All else was unremarkable 
  4. 4. 6/16/2015 4 Patient 1:  ONH OD Patient 1:  ONH OS Patient 1:  Red‐free ONH OD Patient 1:  Red‐free ONH OS Patient 1:  B‐scan OD, OS Patient 1:  B‐scan OD, OS
  5. 5. 6/16/2015 5 Patient 1:  OCT OD, OS Patient 1, cont.  •Assessment: • 1. Buried ONH drusen OU •Plan: • 1. Mother educated on condition; monitor in 6  months  Patient 2 JP – 13 year old Hispanic male • CC: Pt. presented with h/o mild headaches twice a  week; mother reported pt. plays a lot of video games • POcHx: Unremarkable • PMHx: Unremarkable • Height/Weight: Noncontributory • BP: 92/57 mmHg • Medications: None reported • Allergies: Eggs  Patient 2, cont. • VA cc: 20/15 OD, OS with +2.50‐3.50X180 OD, +1.25‐2.00X170 OS  • Color: 6/6 pass OD, OS •HRR • EOMs: FROM OU •(‐)pain, (‐)diplopia • CVF: FTFC OD, OS • PERRL(‐)APD OD, OS; 5‐3 mm OD, OS • Anterior Seg.: Unremarkable OD, OS • IOP: 13 mmHg OD, 14 mmHg OS (Goldmann) • Posterior Seg.:  • ONH OD: pink, perfused, distinct margins, (+)SVP • ONH OS: hyperemic, indistinct margins (not noted  previously), (‐)SVP • C/D ratio: 0.20R OD, 0.1R OS • All else was unremarkable Patient 2, cont. Patient 2:  ONH OD, OS
  6. 6. 6/16/2015 6 Patient 2:  ONH OD, OS Patient 2:  B‐scan OD, OS Patient 2:  B‐scan OD, OS Patient 2:   HVF OD, OS Patient 2:  OCT OD, OS Patient 2, cont.  •Assessment: •1. Buried ONH drusen OS>OD  •Plan: •1. Pt. and mother educated on condition;  monitor in 6 months
  7. 7. 6/16/2015 7 Patient 3 TT – 14 year old AA female • CC: Blur at distance with habitual Rx for 1 month • POcHx/PMHx: Pt. had h/o headaches 2‐3 yrs. prior and was  diagnosed with pseudopapilledema.  At that time, she took  Diamox 250 mg tid for 1 month and then discontinued.  • Height/Weight: 5’3”, 160 lbs. • BP: 108/77 • Medications: None reported • Allergies: NKDA Patient 3, cont. • VA cc: 20/20 OD, OS with ‐2.50 sph OD, ‐1.75‐ 1.00X005 OS • EOMs: FROM OU •(‐)pain, (‐)diplopia • CVF: FTFC OD, OS • PERRL(‐)APD OD, OS; 6‐4 mm OD, OS Patient 3, cont. • Anterior Seg.: Unremarkable OD, OS • IOP: 20 mmHg OD, 19 mmHg OS (NCT) • Posterior Seg.:  • ONH OD, OS: irregular, elevated, scalloped‐like  margins 360o, no vessel obscuration at margins,  “lumpy” appearance • C/D ratio: 0.10R OD, OS • Vessels: tortuosity OU • All else was unremarkable Patient 3:  ONH OD, OS Patient 3:  ONH OD, OS Patient 3:  Red‐free ONH OD
  8. 8. 6/16/2015 8 Patient 3:  Red‐free ONH OS Patient 3:  B‐scan OD Patient 3:  B‐scan OS Patient 3:   HVF OD,  OS  Patient 3:  OCT OD, OS Patient 3, cont.  •Assessment: •1. ONH drusen OU   •Plan: •1. Pt. and mother educated on findings and  condition.  RTC 1 year for annual exam and  HVF or ASAP if any changes.
  9. 9. 6/16/2015 9 Patient 4  DB – 25 year old Hispanic female • CC: Annual examination • POcHx: h/o pseudotumor cerebri diagnosed in Venezuela approx. two years prior  Unremarkable MRI four years ago for “soft spot in skull;” never had lumbar puncture;  was told to lose weight and also prescribed medicine for two weeks that she did not  tolerate • PMHx:  • Headaches—takes Aleve bid daily; awakens with headache and rarely goes away   • Weight has varied throughout teenage years (180s‐240s) • Height/Weight: 5’6”, 243 lbs. • BP: 113/84 mmHg • Meds: Birth control pill from Venezuela—inconsistent use • Allergies: NKDA Patient 4, cont. • VA cc: 20/20 OD, OS with ‐0.25‐1.00X105 OD and ‐ 0.25 sph OS • Color: 10/10 OD, OS •Ishihara • EOMs: FROM OU • CVF: FTFC OD, OS • PERRL (‐)APD Patient 4, cont. • Anterior Seg.: Unremarkable OU • IOP: 20, 20 mmHg OD, OS • Posterior Seg.: •ONH OD, OS: “lumpy” appearance, well  perfused, no obscuration of vessels at  margins •C/D ratio: no physiological cupping •All else was unremarkable Patient 4:  ONH OD Patient 4:  ONH OS Patient 4: B‐Scan OD  OD, OS 
  10. 10. 6/16/2015 10 Patient 4:  B‐scan OS  Patient  4:  HVF OD, OS Patient 4:  OCT OD, OS  Patient 4, cont.  •Assessment •1. ONH drusen OU •Plan •Pt. education; monitor yearly Patient 5   JS – 42 year old Patient Caucasian male • CC: Blur at near > distance without correction • POcHx: LEE 1 yr. prior; told nerves were “abnormal” • PMHx: Negative • Height/Weight: 5’9”, 183 lbs. • BP: 123/59 mmHg • Medications:  None reported • Allergies:  NKDA Patient 5, cont.  •VA cc: 20/20 OD, OS with +0.25‐ 0.75X090 OD, plano OS and +1.25 add  (20/20) •EOMS: FROM OU •CVF: FTFC OD, OS •PERRL (‐)APD
  11. 11. 6/16/2015 11 Patient 5, cont.  • Anterior Seg.: Unremarkable • IOP: 14 mmHg OD, OS (Goldmann) • Posterior Seg.: •ONH OD, OS: congested, “bumpy”  margins  •C/D ratio: <0.1R OD, OS •Vessels:  tortuosity OU •All else was unremarkable Patient 5:  Posterior Pole OD Patient 5:  Posterior Pole OS Patient 5:  Red‐Free Posterior Pole OD Patient 5:  Red‐Free Posterior Pole OS Patient 5:  B‐scan OD
  12. 12. 6/16/2015 12 Patient 5:  B‐scan OD, OS Patient 5:  OCT OD, OS Patient 5, cont.  •Assessment •1. ONH drusen OU with vessel tortuosity •Plan •1. Pt. education; monitor yearly Patient Comparison Pt. 1  Pt. 2 Pt. 3 Pt. 4 Pt. 5 Age 5 13 14 25 42 Race Caucasian Hispanic AA Hispanic Caucasian Sex Female Male Female Female Male Visible ONHD No No  Yes Yes Yes Confirmed with  B‐scan Yes No Yes Yes Yes In summary…  • Most patients have no associated predisposing ocular or systemic  conditions • Patients are usually asymptomatic; visual acuity is generally well  preserved but visual field defects may be present and increase over  time • Proper diagnosis is important to avoid unnecessary testing • ONHD are usually buried in children and become more superficial in  adults • Tests helpful for diagnosis include funduscopy, ultrasonography,  CT/MRI, fluorescein angiography, and OCT  • Regular monitoring is important to rule out accompanying disorders References • 1. Auw‐Haedrich, C., et al. Optic Disk Drusen. Survey of Ophthalmology. 2002 Dec; 47(6): 515‐532. • 2. Gili, P., et al. Using autofluorescence to detect optic nerve head drusen in children. J AAPOS 2013; 17: 568‐571. • 3. Grippo T., et al. Optic disc drusen: practical implications and management. Glaucoma Today. Jan/Feb 2012. Available at:  http://bmctoday.net/glaucomatoday/2012/02/article.asp?f=optic‐disc‐drusen. Accessed 5/13/15.  • 4. Johnson, L., et al. Differentiating Optic Disc Edema From Optic Nerve Head Drusen on Optical Coherence Tomography. Arch  Ophthalmol 2009;127(1):45‐49. • 5. Katz, B., et al. Visual Field Defects and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Defects in Eyes with Buried Optic Nerve Drusen. Am J Ophthalmol 2006: 141: 248‐253. • 6. Kaushal, K., et al. Differentiating Mild Papilledema and Buried Optic Nerve Head Drusen Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence  Tomography. Ophthalmology April 2014; 121(4): 959‐963. • 7. Laul, A., et al. A Detailed Look at Optic Nerve Anomalies. Review of Optometry. 9/15/14. Available at:  http://www.reviewofoptometry.com/content/c/50440/. Accessed 5/13/15. • 8. Lee, K., et al. Differentiation of Optic Nerve Head Drusen and Optic Disc Edema with Spectral‐Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.  Ophthalmology 2011; 118: 971‐977. • 9. Mansour, A., et al. Racial Variation of optic nerve diseases. Neuro‐ophthalmology 1991: 11(6): 319‐323. • 10. Merchant, K., et al. Enhanced Depth Imaging Optical Coherence Tomography of Optic Nerve Head Drusen. Ophthalmology 2013;  120: 1409‐1414. • 11. Morris, R., et al. Advanced visual field loss secondary to optic nerve head drusen:  Case report and literature review. Optometry 2009; 80: 83‐100. • 12. Patel, V., et al. Optic Nerve Drusen. EyeRounds.org. August 14, 2007; Available at: http://www.EyeRounds.org/cases/72‐Optic‐ Nerve‐Drusen‐Visual‐Field‐Loss.htm. Accessed 5/20/15. • 13. Sahin, A., et al. Bilateral Optic Disc Drusen Mimicking Papilledema. J Clin Neurol 2012 Jun; 8(2): 151–154.  • 14. Sato, T., et al. Multimodal Imaging of Optic Disc Drusen. Am J Ophthalmol 2013; 156: 275‐282. • 15. Thurtell, MJ., et al. Optic nerve head drusen in black patients. J Neuroophthalmol March 2012; 32(1): 13‐16. • 16. Wong, S., et al. The Clinical Validity of the Spontaneous Retinal Venous Pulsation. J Neuroophthalmol March 2013; 33(1): 17‐20.
  13. 13. 6/16/2015 13 Questions? Questions? 1a) Which is more common with optic disc drusen‐‐visual acuity  impairment or visual field defects?  1b) Are you more likely to have VF defects with buried ODD  identified by ultrasonography or visible ODD? 1c) What are the most common VF defects?  2) Why can’t ultrasonography detect ODD in young patients?  3) What is the most important differential diagnosis and why?  Validation study of new LCD based contrast  sensitivity testing method  Sarah Henderson, BS Paul Harris, OD, FCOVD, FACBO, FAAO, FNAP Jeung Kim, PhD, OD Southern College of Optometry Memphis, TN 38104 • Why is CS important? • Can assess different aspects of ocular  conditions that go well beyond standard  measures of visual acuity (VA) • Gives more comprehensive understanding  of visual function • Several ocular conditions can contribute  to poor CS Contrast Sensitivity (CS) CS Tests • Pelli‐Robson • Contrast threshold for a fixed letter size • Bailey‐Lovie high and low‐contrast chart • Optotype threshold for a fixed contrast level • Vistech • 5 different spatial frequency levels to obtain a CS curve • Limited application •Cataracts and other media opacities •Amblyopia •Retinal dystrophy and degeneration •Optic neuropathy (e.g. glaucoma)  •Vascular conditions (e.g. diabetic  retinopathy)  Lists of Ocular Conditions 
  14. 14. 6/16/2015 14 • Used on a liquid‐crystal‐display (LCD)  monitor • Manipulation of contrast level with  different optotype sizes • Two types of target: Sloan letters, sine  wave grating  Harris Contrast Test (M&S Smart System®)  Harris Contrast Test (M&S Smart System®)  Harris Contrast Test (M&S Smart System®)  • To assess the validity of acuity thresholds on a fixed  contrast level on the Harris chart as compared to the  Bailey‐Lovie low contrast chart. • To validate the use of the Harris chart in establishing  one’s contrast sensitivity curve across varying acuity  levels. Purpose of Study •53 healthy adults were  examined •Inclusion criteria: •BCVA of 20/20 or better •Absence of systemic and/or  ocular conditions that can  decrease CS •Mean age: 29 (+/‐10.5 years) Methods • Initial BCVA measured on high‐contrast Bailey‐ Lovie chart • Low contrast acuity threshold measured on  low‐contrast Bailey‐Lovie chart  • Low contrast acuity threshold measured on  Harris contrast chart at fixed 18% Weber  contrast level • Contrast thresholds measured at 20/400,  20/200, 20/100, 20/50, 20/40 and 20/30 Sloan  letters  Methods (Cont’d)
  15. 15. 6/16/2015 15 •Low contrast Bailey‐Lovie logMAR:  • ‐0.006 (+/‐ 0.11)  • VA equivalent: 20/19.725 •Harris equivalent logMAR:  • ‐0.0038 (‐0.0038 +/‐ 0.09) • VA equivalent 20/19.825 •No statistically significant different  (p=0.455)  Results Results (Cont’d) 1 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 20/400 20/200 20/100 20/50 20/40 20/30 Contrast Thresholds  a a a b c d LogCS Sloan letter sizes •Demonstrated the utility and efficacy of the  Harris contrast chart (M&S Technologies) as  compared to traditional tests (Bailey‐Lovie low  contrast chart) •Overall CS function readily obtainable Conclusion • M&S Technologies  • Dr. Patricia Cisarik, OD, PhD  • Summer research fellowship at Southern College of  Optometry  • Any questions • Email: jkim@sco.edu Acknowledgement  • Bex, P, Pelli, DG. Measuring Contrast Sensitivity.  Vision Research. 90  (2013) 10–14. • Bonette, L, Elliott, DB, Whitaker, D. Differences in  the legibility  of letters at contrast threshold  using the Pelli‐Robson chart.  Ophthal. P hysiol. Opt. 10 (1990) 323‐326.  • Bullimore, MA, Elliott, DB. Assessing the  Reliability, Discriminative  Ability and Validity  of Disability Glare Tests. Investigative  Ophthalmology & Visual Science. 34 (1993)    108‐19. • I.L. Bailey, J.E. Lovie‐Kitchin / Vision Research 90  (2013) 2–9.  References:  Questions? Why is contrast sensitivity important?   Because a high contrast Dominick Maino looks so much better than  low contrast Maino!
  16. 16. 6/16/2015 16 Questions? 1. What benefits does the Harris chart have over other  standard contrast charts? 2. Is it commercially available? 3. How would you incorporate it into a routine  examination? Bilateral Cystoid Macular Edema  in Retinitis Pigmentosa and its  Management Lindsay T. Gibney OD, FAAO Resident, Omni Eye Specialist Baltimore Retinitis Pigmentosa • A group of inherited disorders resulting in progressive degeneration and  dysfunction of photoreceptors and RPE. • Hallmark symptoms include difficulty with night vision and progressive  peripheral visual field loss. • Retinal signs include bone spicules, mottling and granularity of the RPE,  attenuated vessels, waxy pallor of optic nerve head. • Generally thought of as affecting peripheral vision, but central vision  often affected in advanced disease and loss can occur early on from… • PSC Cataracts • Central Retinal Degeneration • Macular Edema Genetics • May be inherited in many different patterns including, autosomal  dominant, autosomal recessive and X‐linked.  • Simplex RP: When no other affected family member can be identified.  Large percentage are likely autosomal recessive. • May be typical (non‐syndromic) or complicated (syndromic). • Many different genetic mutations are associated with RP. Rhodopsin  mutations are an example of a common genetic mutation leading to RP.  • Those with the autosomal dominant pattern are more likely to retain  good vision late in life compared to recessive or x‐linked. “Worsening central vision loss.” CC: 27 W M with complaints of significant decrease in central vision about  2 days prior. Recently moved to the area and was seeing a retina specialist  prior to relocating. Diagnosed with RP by last provider, but had previously  been told had macular degeneration. Ocular Hx: Retinitis Pigmentosa, No known ocular procedures Medical Hx: Overall healthy Medications: dorzolamide 2% bid OU ‐ discontinued Last Eye Exam: About 2 months ago Exam findings Entrance Testing OD OS BCVA 20/200 20/400 Pupils PERRL, (‐) APD PERRL, (‐) APD Confrontation Visual Field FTFC FTFC Ocular Motility EOMI Muscle Balance Ortho on penlight IOP 18 mmHg (Applanation) 16 mmHg (Applanation) Dilation 1% Tropicamide & 2.5% phenylephrine OU @ 1:03 pm
  17. 17. 6/16/2015 17 External Exam OD OS Adnexa Normal Normal Lids Normal Normal Conjunctiva Clear Clear Cornea Clear Clear Anterior Chamber Deep & Quiet Deep & Quiet Iris Normal pupil size & shape Normal pupil size & shape Lens Clear Clear Internal Exam OD OS Vitreous (+) vitreous cells (+) vitreous cells Optic Disc 0.4, no edema, no vascularization,  good color 0.4, no edema, no vascularization,  good color Macula Macular thickening, NO FLR Macular thickening, NO FLR Vessels 2/3 ratio w/o tortuosity 2/3 ratio w/o tortuosity Periphery Flat & attached 360, RPE  Hypertrophy/mild Bone spicules  Flat & attached 360, RPE  Hypertrophy/mild Bone spicules  Macular Edema in Retinitis Pigmentosa Exact mechanism unclear, likely multifactorial ‐ Low grade inflammation leading to breakdown of blood‐retinal barrier ‐ Decreased efficiency of RPE ‐ Antiretinal antibodies; antienolase and anticarbonic anhydrase ‐ Epiretinal membranes ‐ Pseudophakic CME, RP patients more susceptible to inflammation Rate of CME found to be 32% in at least one eye on SD‐OCT, even in patients  with no fundoscopic evidence. 1 May be as high as 70% of patients with RP. 2 CAIs for Macular Edema in RP • Mechanism of Action: Main effect is likely increase passage of fluid through  the RPE. May also improve extrafoveal sensitivity resulting in subjective  improvement. • Topical vs. Oral: Initial studies showed that oral was more efficacious. May not  have been long enough. May take month to get a response. • Leakage on FA vs. no leakage response to CAI: Macular edema in RP mostly  does not show leakage on FA and is less responsive to current therapies for  macular edema. • Efficacy of CAIs: Most effective option based on the current literature. 20‐ 55.6% success rates/improvement in acuity.1 • Other possible options • Steroids  • Intravitreal (Ozurdex, Allergan) • Topical? • NSAIDs
  18. 18. 6/16/2015 18 Current Considerations 1) OCT for patients with known RP 2) Also VF – Goldmann or Octopus – recommended at least every 2 years to monitor  field of vision for driving 3) Other testing: FA, ERG, microperimetry and autofluorescence 4) Syndromic RP may need consults with other practitioners – e.g. Usher Syndrome 5) Genetic Counseling – May help determine prognosis and guide therapy. 6) Low Vision consult 7) Psychological Counseling Potential Adverse Factors • Smoking • Light • UV protection • Blue light filtering? • Bright flash photography?  • Medications • Isoretinin • Vitamin E • Viagra Future  •Vitamin therapy •Gene & Stem Cell therapy •Retinal devices Vitamin Therapy • Vitamin A • May slow progress of RP – effects modest, 2% • Very high dosage, 15,000 IU/day– monitor for toxicity, baseline and annual liver function tests • Lower dosages are known to cause birth defects – careful with females • Response may be genotype dependent – may need to be guided by genotyping • DHA • Trial found it to enhance the benefits of Vitamin A therapy for up to 2 years, not found to be  beneficial alone. • Patients with X‐linked RP found to have lower levels of DHA. • 400mg‐1200mg/day • Lutein • Thought to be beneficial. Has shown lessened mid‐peripheral field loss when taken with  Vitamin A. • 12‐20mg/day2‐4 Gene & Stem Cell Therapy Gene Therapy • Either add function or block function • May only be preventative, only useful for early disease • Limited historically by non‐specific transfection • Typically uses Adeno‐associated virus (AAV) delivery • Carries a limited amount of DNA Stem Cell Therapy • Replaces cells lost due to the disease • Transplanted photoreceptors must be integrated into the retina, cannot use  mature photoreceptors5 • 3D retinal layer grown in lab recently6 Retinal Devices • May be sub‐retinal or epiretinal • Argus II (Second Sight)  • Epiretinal • FDA approved in February 2013 • Approved for “Severe” Retinitis Pigmentosa: 25 yrs or older  with bare or NLP vision from advanced RP • Cost ~ $145,0007
  19. 19. 6/16/2015 19 Bibliography 1) Ryan S, Schachat A, Wilkinson C, Hinton D, Sadda S, Wiedemann P. Retina. Elsevier  Health Sciences; 2013. 2) Gallemore R, Shyu A, Heckenlively, J. Retinitis Pigmentosa: Optimizing Care for Your  Patients. New Retina MD. Fall 2013. 3) Telander D. Retinitis Pigmentosa Treatment & Management. Medscape Reference.  Updated Feb 17, 2015. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1227488‐ treatment#showall. Accessed May 26,2015. 4) Rayapudi S, Schwartz SG, Wang X, Chavis P. Vitamin A and fish oils for retinitis  pigmentosa. The Cochrane database of systematic reviews. 2013;12:CD008428.  doi:10.1002/14651858.CD008428.pub2. 5) Lin M, Tsai Y, Tsang S. Emerging Treatments for Retinitis Pigmentosa. Retinal Physician,  Volume: 12 , Issue: March 2015, page(s): 52‐55, 70. 6) Roth M. Can embryonic stem cells help stop blindness? Pittsburgh Post‐Gazette. May 24,  2015. http://www.post‐gazette.com/news/health/2015/05/24/Can‐embryonic‐stem‐cells‐ help‐stop‐blindness/stories/201505250008. Accessed May 26, 2015. 7) Castillo M. FDA‐approved bionic eye Argus II aims to restore some vision in the blind.  CBS News. October 7, 2013. http://www.cbsnews.com/news/fda‐approved‐bionic‐eye‐ argus‐ii‐aims‐to‐restore‐some‐vision‐in‐the‐blind/. Accessed May 26,2015. Questions? Questions? 1) Why is macular edema in RP patients  unresponsive to anti‐VEGF therapy? 2) What are predictors of visual loss in RP? 3) What is the recommended dosage for CAI  therapy? An ODE to Optic Disc Edema Kelli Theisen, O.D. Primary Care and Ocular Disease Resident Illinois College of Optometry/Illinois Eye Institute AOA‐ Optometry’s Meeting 2015 Case History • 32 AAM: IEI Urgent Care Referral “Papilledema OS” • CC: peripheral blur • HPI:  • OS • X 2 weeks • Clear central vision • (+) dulling of colors • PO/MHx: unremarkable  • SHx: former smoker, occasional EtOH Clinical Exam OD OS 20/20‐1 VA 20/20‐1 FTFC CVF FTFC FULL, (+) discomfort in right  gaze EOMs FULL, (+) discomfort in right  gaze E(3)RRL Pupils E(3)RRL, 1+ APD 100% Red Cap Desaturation 80% K scar SLE K scar See Photo DFE See Photo
  20. 20. 6/16/2015 20 OD OS Differential Diagnoses  Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy  Nonarteritic  Arteritic  Optic neuritis  Demyelinating  Infectious/infiltrative  Compressive lesion  Toxic optic neuropathy
  21. 21. 6/16/2015 21 NA‐AION • Age 61 ± 12 • (+) Disc Hemes • Altitudinal VF loss • Minimal color loss • Painless • Disc at risk • Systemic RFs  Optic Neuritis • Age 18‐45 • (‐) Disc Hemes • Variable VF loss • Substantial color loss • Pain on EOMs • Systemic causes Leading Differentials NA‐AION • Age 61 ± 12 • (+) Disc Hemes • Altitudinal VF loss • Minimal color loss • Painless • Disc at risk • Systemic RFs  Optic Neuritis • Age 18‐45 • (‐) Disc Hemes • Variable VF loss • Substantial color loss • Pain on EOMs • Systemic causes Leading Differentials NA‐AION • Age 61 ± 12 • (+) Disc Hemes • Altitudinal VF loss • Minimal color loss • Painless • Disc at risk • Systemic RFs  Optic Neuritis • Age 18‐45 • (‐) Disc Hemes • Variable VF loss • Substantial color loss • Pain on EOMs • Systemic causes Leading Differentials http://www.reviewofoptometry.com/content/c/50440/ http://www.ophthalmicphotography.info/website/disc/neuritis.html T1  T2 FLAIR  T2 post gadolinium with fat suppression
  22. 22. 6/16/2015 22 LABS and CXR Lab Test Value √ / X Syphilis Screen (EIA) Non‐reactive √ Diabetes Glucose  101 √ HbA1c 5.4 √ Lipid Panel Cholesterol 167 √ Triglycerides 61 √ HDL 54 √  LDL 101 √ Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 14 √ Chest XR ‐ Possible mild R and L hilar lymphadenopathy                     ? Chest CT ‐ Calcified nodule c/w granuloma; no hilar adenopathy ? NA‐AION • Age 61 ± 12 • Sudden, painless VA loss • ONH edema, (+) hemes • Systemic risk factors • Diabetes • Hypertension • Blood loss • Hyperlipidemia • Sleep apnea • Migraine • Smoking • PDE‐5 inhibitors • ONH risk factors • “Disc at risk” • Drusen • Edema • Defective circulatory auto‐ regulation Blood supply to ONH • CRA • SPCA • Pial plexus Ischemia of  ONH Axoplasmic  flow stasis Axonal  swelling Disc at risk Vascular  compression NA‐AION NA‐AION Treatment?  Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Decompression Trial  Sergott 1989  .  Systemic steroids  Aspirin  Triamcinolone  Avastin Observe ONDS VA ↑ 43% 33% VA ↓ 12% 24% NA‐AION Management  If ≥ 50 YO  ESR  CRP  Fluorescein Angiography  Identify vascular risk factors  Monitor  Resolution of edema  RNFL loss  Risk of recurrence
  23. 23. 6/16/2015 23 Initial visit 4 months later Initial visit 4 months later Summary • Be suspicious of GCA • Differentials in atypical presentations • PCP coordination • Vision on presentation • Color plates vs red cap Literature ReviewedArnold AC, Costa RMS, Dumitrascu OM.  The spectrum of optic disc ischemia in patients younger than 50 years (an American Ophthalmological Society Thesis). Trans Am  Ophthalmol Soc 2013; 111: 93‐118. Atkins EJ, Bruce BB, Newman NJ, Biousse V. Treatment of Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy.  Surv Ophthalmol 2010; 55(1): 47‐63. Bender B, Heine C, Danz S, Bischof F, Reimann K, Bender M, Nagele T, Ernemann U, Korn A. Diffusion Restriction of the Optic Nerve in Patients With Acute Visual Deficit. J. Magn.  Reson. Imaging 2014; 40: 334‐340. Contreras I, Noval S, Rebolleda G, Munoz‐Negrete FJ.  Follow‐up of Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy with Optical Coherence Tomography. Ophthalmology 2007;  114: 2338‐2344. Deramo VA, Sergott RC, Augsburger JJ, Foroozan R, Savino PJ, Leone A. Ischemic Optic Neuropathy as the First Manifestation of Elevated Cholesterol Levels in Young Patients.  Ophthalmology 2003; 110: 1041‐1045. Friedland S, Winterkorn JMS, Burde R. Luxury Perfusion Following Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy. Journal of Neuro‐Ophthalmology 1996; 16(3): 163‐171.  Ischemic Optic Nueropathy Decompression Trial Research Group. Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Decompression Trial: twenty‐four– month update. Arch Ophthalmol 2000; 118: 793‐ 798. Hayreh SS. Ischemic optic neuropathies—where are we now? Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol 2013; 251: 1873‐1884. Hayreh SS. Management of ischemic optic neuropathies. Indian J Ophthalmol 2011; 59 (2): 123‐136. Hayreh SS, Zimmerman MB. Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy: Natural History of Visual Outcome. Ophthalmology 2008;115 (2): 298‐305. Hayreh SS, Zimmerman MB. Optic disc edema in non‐arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. Graefe’s Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol 2007; 245: 1107‐1121. He M, Cestari D, Cunnane MB, Rizzo JF. The Use of Diffusion MRI in Ischemic Optic Neuropathy and Optic Neuritis. Seminars in Ophthalmology 2010; 25(5‐6): 225‐232. Laties, AM. Vision Disorders and Phosphodiesterase Type 5 Inhibitors, A Review of the Evidence to Date. Drug Safety 2009; 32(1): 1‐18. O’Neill EC, Danesh‐Meyer HV, Connell, PP, Trounce IA, Coote MA, Mackey DA, Crowston JG. The optic nerve head in acquired optic neuropathies. Nat Rev Neurol 2010; 6: 221‐ 236. Preechawat P, Bruce BB, Newman NJ, Biousse V. Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy in Patients Younger than 50 Years. Am J Ophthalmol 2007; 144: 953‐960.  Thank You • Dr. Leonard Messner • Dr. Stephanie Klemencic • Dr. Christina Morettin Questions?
  24. 24. 6/16/2015 24 Questions? 1‐ What is the chance of a recurrence of NAION  in the fellow eye? 2‐ How often does a visual field “improve”  following an acute episode of NAION? 3‐ Does the literature suggest any correlated  systemic etiologies for NAION in young  individuals? Is Binocular Balancing with  Subjective Refraction a thing of the  Past?  David I. Geffen, OD, FAAO Refraction •Over 100 years the same method •Confusing for the patient •Inaccurate •Low Tech 20/20 is not Vision Optimized! PSF Refraction Is More Sensitive • Changes in 0.05D are now noticeable
  25. 25. 6/16/2015 25 145 146 147 Patient Responses  • Easier to tell the difference • High tech  • Less strain • Feels more accurate Generates More Accurate Rx •Subjective refraction – not auto‐refraction • Rx is at equal or higher level of reliability than a phoropter (unlike  objective wavefront devices)  •Point Spread Function technology attains a  higher level of sensitivity and accuracy   • Patients can discern differences more clearly with PSF than with  Snellen letters •PSF refines the Rx end point to 0.05D, 5X  better than phoropters • Provides highest level of visual acuity and contrast Maximum Plus Maximum Visual Acuity • Prevention of over‐minussing due to the true perception of the  PSF and the target detail versus using Snellen optotypes which  requires one self to determine their own visual stress point of  smaller and darker.  • With the Vmax system if the patient is over‐minused, the target  simply looks blurry again. This allows for a decrease in the level of  patient frustration by having an un‐ambiguous which yields a higher  level of clinical confidence. Confidence in the refraction was found  to 95% amongst patients achieving identical or better refraction  with the device compared to a manual phoropter 150 [1] Vmax Data of file.
  26. 26. 6/16/2015 26 70% 27% 3% 30 Patients Study (Right Eye)   The Difference in Spherical Equivalence Between Binocular  Balanced Phoropter Rx versus PSF Refractor Rx Equal to or Less than .13D Difference Greater Than .13D Difference Greater than .255D Difference VMax® Systems 152 A Complete Refraction-Lane-in-a-Box PSF Integra™ PSF Refractor™ Questions? Questions? 1) Do we really need to have an accuracy of 0.05D when we  conduct a refraction? 2.) How does point spread refracting control  accommodative response? 3) Why is point spread refracting more accurate than  standard refracting? 4) I use an automated phropter, why would I consider this? Any other comments or  questions? Thank You!

×