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Why is P.E.E.L the Barry Crier of Education?

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Why is P.E.E.L the Barry Crier of Education?

  1. 1. Why is PEEL the Barry Cryer of education? “You can trace all good jokes back to Barry Cryer”
  2. 2. PEEL • Project for Enhancing Effective Learning • founded in 1985 by a group of teachers and academics who shared concerns about the prevalence of passive, unreflective, dependent student learning, even in apparently successful lessons. • classroom approaches that would stimulate and support student learning that was more informed, purposeful, intellectually active and independent
  3. 3. Metacognitive stragetgies 0.69
  4. 4. Teacher Concerns • Students rarely contribute ideas • Students don't think about the meaning of what they read or hear • Students don't link different lessons • Students don't think about why or how they are doing a task • Teachers find negotiations difficult • Students keep making the same mistakes • Students don't read instructions carefully • Students don't learn from mistakes in assessment tasks • Students won't take responsibility for their learning • Students dive into tasks without planning • Students have no strategies when stuck • Students don't link school work with outside life • Dealing with mixed ability classes • Students don't believe that their own beliefs are relevant • Students are reluctant to take risks in creative tasks • Students are reluctant to edit or check their work • Students' existing beliefs are not easy to change • Classroom management
  5. 5. List of Good Learning Behaviours 1. Checks personal comprehension for instruction and material. Requests further information if needed. Tells the teacher what they don't understand 2. Seeks reasons for aspects of the work at hand. 3. Plans a general strategy before starting. 4. Anticipates and predicts possible outcomes. 5. Checks teacher's work for errors; offers corrections. 6. Offers or seeks links between - different activities and ideas - different topics or subjects - schoolwork and personal life 7. Searches for weaknesses in their own understandings; checks the consistency of their explanations across different situations. 8. Suggests new activities and alternative procedures. 9. Challenges the text or an answer the teacher sanctions as correct. 10. Offers ideas, new insights and alternative explanations. 11. Justifies opinions. 12. Reacts and refers to comments of other students
  6. 6. It is not just a set of worksheets… • You are using a PEEL approach if you are or are moving towards: • Having a strategic, long-term learning agenda focussing on multiple aspects of quality learning and metacognition. • Making consistent, persistent and purposeful use of teaching procedures, appropriate teaching behaviours and the Principles of Teaching for Quality Learning. • Trusting students and sharing responsibilities and intellectual control with students. • Problematizing and purposefully interrogating and developing your practice. Becoming more metacognitive about your teaching and developing new dimensions of sense-making. • Supportive and being supported by others in a process of collaborative action research. • State what the procedure is for • Run the procedure • Debrief why and how?
  7. 7. PEEL principles of teaching for quality LEARNING 1. Share intellectual control 2. Look for occasions when students can work out part (or all) of the content or instructions 3. Provide opportunity for choice and independent decision making 4. Provide diverse range of experiencing success 5. Promote talk which is exploratory, tentative and hypothetical 6. Encourage students to learn from other students questions and comments 7. Build a classroom environment that supports risk taking 8. Using a wide variety of intellectually challenging teaching procedures
  8. 8. 9. Use teaching procedures that are designed to promote specific aspects of quality learning 10. Develop students awareness of the big picture: how various activities fit together and link to the big idea 11. Regularly raise students awareness of the nature Of different aspects of quality learning 12. Promote assessment as part of the process.
  9. 9. High risk start point • Dirty trick- rubbish notes • Caution- students feel cheated will they trust you again? • Opens up discussion about active and passive learning • Stimulates students to ask more questions about what they are looking at • Students refused to make notes before they understood what they meant • Recommended that it is used sparingly • Science alternative plan experiment using this equipment with spurious extras.
  10. 10. Can you spot the problem?
  11. 11. Www.peelweb.org Searchable data base
  12. 12. How- and why? What pedagogicial purpose would te strategy develop? 5 from 3 Quiz Before Before After After Question grid New dictation Jumbled instructions Venn diagrams a new way Writing in the round Moving on map What’s wrong with this picture?
  13. 13. Moving on map
  14. 14. Writing in the Round Each student has a sheet with a sentence at the top Add successive sentences. Choose bes- highlight key ideas, underline succesful writing.t Share best with class Could focus on coherence or listing content What must students be doing to make this successful?
  15. 15. Before before after after • Can be done over long time period e.g. picture of pyramids could lead to talk of impact of tourism etc • Can be done in a table describe what is seen now, then before, then after then before before • Allow discussion within student groups
  16. 16. Before Before Before Present What do you see? what do you think is happening? After After After
  17. 17. Before Before Before Prese nt What do you see what do you think is happening? After What will happen in one hours time to the pill? After After
  18. 18. Before Before Before What happened to the pill 6 months before this picture was taken? Present What do you see what do you think is happening? After What will happen in one hours time to the pill? After After
  19. 19. Before Before Before What happened to the pill 6 months before this picture was taken? Present What do you see what do you think is happening? After What will happen in one hours time to the pill? After After What will happen to the pill in 5 days time?
  20. 20. Before Before What happened to the pill 5 years before this picture was taken? Before What happened to the pill 6 months before this picture was taken? Present What do you see what do you think is happening? After What will happen in one hours time to the pill? After After What will happen to the pill in 5 days time?
  21. 21. What? When? Where? Which? Who? Why? How? Event Situation Choice Person Reason Means Is Present Did Past Can Possibility Would Probability Will Prediction Might Imagination
  22. 22. • Text read by teacher students do not write but listen. They try to get the overview of the article. • Teacher questions • Teacher reads again, but, more slowly but to fast to copy! • Students bullet point key points • Teacher stops regularly to discuss what they have so far • Then give article to compare • Additions/ changes in a different colour New dictation
  23. 23. Jumbled instructions • Example from a practical • Debrief how is it different to just telling them. • Benefits from ambiguity
  24. 24. Venn a new way • Do not give the diagram • Ask them to design it • This will stimulate lots of questions even before they start using it. • Students will find that they need to know quite a bit before they can make decisions.
  25. 25. Biscuit challenge • Crackers • Chocolate bars • Chocolate biscuits • Cake • Bread • Biscuit
  26. 26. Biscuit challenge • Crackers • Chocolate bars • Chocolate biscuits • Cake • Bread • Biscuit • Butter puff • Ritz • Lemon puff • Chocolate digestives • Baps • Crumpet • Scones • Doughnut • Jaffa cake • Tea cake • Penguin • Wagon wheel • Twix • Kit Kat • Mars • French toast • Eccles cake
  27. 27. 5 out of 3 quiz • Cut up the questions do what ever question your group finds easiest • You will be marked out of three • If you score is less than three you may now use your books as a source of information
  28. 28. • If your answer is so it good it includes extra relevant information you may get 4 out of 3 • At the end of the lesson your teacher will judge which answer is the best for each question. This one will be awarded 5 out of 3 • We will total your groups score at the end • Make sure you write your groups name on the back of each answer sheet
  29. 29. What was the earth’s early atmosphere? What impact did volcanoes have? What impact did the evolution of plants have? What is the earth’s atmosphere like today? Where did the earth’s Carbon dioxide go? What is the ozone layer?
  30. 30. What was the earth’s early atmosphere? • Mainly Hydrogen and Helium escaped into space • Then mainly carbon dioxide and water vapour • With small amounts of methane ammonia 3 marks Formula H He CO2 H2O CH4 NH3 for additional mark Or gravity not holding helium hydrogen Or volcanoes released gases Or water vapour eventually cooled to form lakes oceans What impact did volcanoes have? • Volcanoes erupted releasing carbon dioxide and water vapour • When the water vapour cooled it condensed to form the oceans • Water formation provided an environment for plants to evolve leading to oxygen being released When volcanoes were having their biggest impact the atmosphere had little oxygen The presence of oxygen then allowed the evolution of organisms that respired What impact did the evolution of plants have? • Appeared 3.5 billion years ago • Used water and carbon dioxide for Photosynthesis released oxygen into atmosphere • This oxygen reacts with ammonia and methane making water carbon dioxide and nitrogen 3 marks Flammable to describe methane ammonia Chloroplasts etc in context Oxygen was a “pollutant” at the time killing some microbes Led to a reduction in co2 levels What is the earth’s atmosphere like today? • Majority is nitrogen • Next most common is oxygen • Other gases include carbon dioxide water vapour and noble gases 78% Nitrogen 21% o2 0.04% co2 named noble gas (especially argon) atmosphere has been more or less the same for 200 million years measured in dry as water vapour would be variable Where did the earth’s Carbon dioxide go? • Through photosynthesis • Became locked up as carbohydrate? • Locked up as sedimentary rocks such as carbonates and fossil fuels Naming a carbonate and the fossil fuels The process of fossil fuel formation What is the ozone layer? • Made from the oxygen in the air • Absorbs harmful radiation • Forms between 25-50kn above the surface of the earth Formula is o3 Harmful radiation would have stopped the evolution of life
  31. 31. • Photo of 5 from 3 quiz

Editor's Notes

  • How I came across it Why I found it useful Nothing new but a central compilation of tried and tested strategies
  • Use as quick introduction almost as success criteria would be used
  • Used with a class that were aggressively passive

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