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FOR FURTHER COPIES AND ENQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACTDepartment of Further Education, Employment, Science and TechnologyOffice o...
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SECTION ONE                                   7         YEAR IN REVIEW           Our Business                             ...
CONTENTSSECTION FOUR                                     83CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND REPORTING  Ministerial Accountability ...
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SECTION ONE         YEAR IN REVIEWPage 7
1.1 Our BusinessThe Department of Further Education, Employment,Science and Technology’s (DFEEST) role is to ensure thedev...
YEAR IN REVIEW1.2 From the Chief ExecutiveI am pleased to present the 2011 Annual Report for theDepartment of Further Educ...
1.3 At A Glance : Highlights of 2011                            -   123 800 South Australian students participated in accr...
YEAR IN REVIEW                              -     South Australia exceeded National Partnership Agreement targets         ...
1.4 Skills for All Skills for All, announced in late December 2010, is the             MORE SUPPORT FOR THE MOST DISADVANT...
YEAR IN REVIEWAN ASSURANCE OF QUALITY                                          A RENEWED PARTNERSHIP WITH INDUSTRYFrom 201...
1.5 TAFE SA As South Australia’s largest provider of VET, TAFE SA plays a    TAFE SA was also awarded, or contributed to t...
YEAR IN REVIEWPlans for 20122012 is a very important year for TAFE SA, with significant        TAFE SA will continue to se...
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SECTION TWO          ABOUT THE DEPARTMENTPage 17
2.1 Our PrioritiesThrough skills and innovation, DFEEST provides the                   OUR VISIONunderpinning elements for...
ABOUT THE DEPARTMENTOUR VALUESDFEEST is striving to become a high-performance learning         Openness in decision making...
2.2 Our Structure                                                                  PRODUCTIVITYIn order to successfully re...
ABOUT THE DEPARTMENTPOLICY AND CORPORATE SUPPORTStrategic Policy, Resources and           Corporate Services              ...
2.3 South Australia’s Strategic PlanSouth Australia’s Strategic Plan (SASP) outlines a medium tolong-term course for the w...
ABOUT THE DEPARTMENTRELAUNCH OF THE SASPThe 2011 update of the SASP included 100 targetsrestructured to reflect the vision...
2.4 Our Five Year Strategic Plan 2010-14The department’s Five Year Strategic Plan 2010-14, releasedin May 2010, provides t...
ABOUT THE DEPARTMENT5. WORLD COMPETITIVE RESEARCH, TECHNOLOGY AND                    7. DFEEST IS A HIGH-PERFORMANCE ORGAN...
Joshua Konc -                         Apprentice of the Year          2011 South Australian Training AwardsPage 26
SECTION THREE          OUR PERFORMANCEPage 27
3.1 Workforce PlanningDFEEST Strategic Plan Goal 1DFEEST continued to refine workforce modelling in                       ...
OUR PERFORMANCEPlans for 2012As the government transfers its regulatory powers over to       In 2012 the TaSC will continu...
Employment Growth The current annual employment growth rate at December 2011 was 0.6 percent in South Australia and 0.1 pe...
OUR PERFORMANCEYoung people full time in school, work or further education/trainingIn November 2011, 85.5 percent of young...
3.2 Engagement with IndustryDFEEST Strategic Plan Goals1, 2 and 3APPRENTICES AND TRAINEESThe traineeship and apprenticeshi...
OUR PERFORMANCEFigure 5: Trainee and apprentice activity, five years ending 30 June 2011 4 40000 35000 30000 25000 20000  ...
User Choice Training Subsidies                                     E-Training PlansThe department is responsible for the p...
OUR PERFORMANCEPlans for 2012Harmonisation                                                  PhoenixIn 2011, states and ter...
UPSKILLING EXISTING WORKERSJobs Strategy Projects                                          Environmental SustainabilityAs ...
OUR PERFORMANCEASSISTANCE FOR RETRENCHED WORKERSDFEEST supported 194 workers through the Retrenched              As at 30 ...
TAFE SA - INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPSTAFE SA acknowledges the important contribution industry          In 2011, TAFE SA also dev...
OUR PERFORMANCEEngineering and Automotive Industries                             Hair and BeautyTAFE SA collaborated with ...
3.3 Providing Opportunities for AllDFEEST Strategic Plan Goal 3SOUTH AUSTRALIA WORKSSouth Australia Works - Working Region...
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DFEEST Annual Report 2011

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The Annual Report represents an overview of DFEEST’s achievements, governance, workforce management and financial performance. It also outlines progress made towards achieving our objectives in South Australia’s Strategic Plan.

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DFEEST Annual Report 2011

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  2. 2. FOR FURTHER COPIES AND ENQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACTDepartment of Further Education, Employment, Science and TechnologyOffice of the Chief ExecutiveGPO Box 320ADELAIDE SA 5001ABN: 16692317206Telephone: (08) 8226 3821Facsimile: (08) 8226 9533The 2011 Annual Report is available on the department’s website at:http://www.dfeest.sa.gov.auISSN: 1449-6437Page 2
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  4. 4. SECTION ONE 7 YEAR IN REVIEW Our Business 8 From the Chief Executive 9 At a Glance: Highlights of 2011 10 Skills for All 12 TAFE SA 14 SECTION TWO 17 ABOUT THE DEPARTMENT Our Priorities 18 Our Structure 20 South Australia’s Strategic Plan 22 DFEEST’s Five Year Strategic Plan 2010-14 24 SECTION THREE 27 OUR PERFORMANCE Workforce Planning 28 Engagement with Industry 32 Providing Opportunities for All 40 Building World-Class Infrastructure 50 Digital Economy and Technology 54 A Focus on Quality 57 Science and Research 64 Tertiary Education 68 National Contributions 78Page 4
  5. 5. CONTENTSSECTION FOUR 83CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND REPORTING Ministerial Accountability 84 Legislation 84 Boards, Committees and Authorities 85 Governance 87 Asbestos Management in Government Buildings 89 Carers Recognition Act 2005 89 Disability Action Plans 89 Freedom of Information 89 Management of Human Resources 91 Reconciliation 102 Sustainability 103 Urban Design Charter 111 Whistleblowers Protection Act 1993 111SECTION FIVE 113FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE Financial Overview 114 Summary of Financial Information 114 Audited General Purpose Financial Report 119 Account Payment Performance 165 Consultants 165 Certification by Departmental Executive 167 Independent Auditor’s Report 168 Contractual Arrangements 170 Fraud 170 Overseas Travel 170GLOSSARY 173 Page 5
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  7. 7. SECTION ONE YEAR IN REVIEWPage 7
  8. 8. 1.1 Our BusinessThe Department of Further Education, Employment,Science and Technology’s (DFEEST) role is to ensure thedevelopment of the state’s workforce to meet industrypriorities, to maximise the opportunities for all SouthAustralians to engage in education, training and work, tobuild a more responsive and flexible training system and toexploit opportunities for South Australia to be at theforefront of research, science, technology and innovation.To do this we manage the training system by providingfunding for training, empowering industry, enterprises andindividuals to invest in quality training through contractingand regulation, monitoring provider performance andmanaging vocational education and training (VET)infrastructure. We also help build the tertiary education,science, research and innovative capacity in South Australiaby supporting universities and research institutions.DFEEST has undertaken a range of functions in order tomeet its objectives and contribute to the achievement of During the reporting period, DFEESTSouth Australia’s Strategic Plan (SASP) objectives and played a central role in achieving 14 oftargets. South Australia’s Strategic Plan targets in the areas of employment, education andThese included: training as well as science, technology - the provision of strategic policy advice for and innovation. developing the State’s workforce, in conjunction with the Training and Skills Commission (TaSC) - ensuring high-quality VET is delivered by TAFE institutes under the Office of TAFE SA, private registered training organisations and adult community education providers - regulation of VET providers, non-university higher education providers, and providers of English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students - regulation, administration and funding of apprenticeships and traineeships - managing state-funded employment and training support programs - supporting the government’s strategic direction in the higher education sector - raising the profile of South Australia in the international education marketplace - developing policies and strategies, and delivering programs, that create opportunities for Aboriginal people, young people, people with a disability and older workers - provision of strategic advice and delivery of programs in the areas of science, technology and information economy.Page 8
  9. 9. YEAR IN REVIEW1.2 From the Chief ExecutiveI am pleased to present the 2011 Annual Report for theDepartment of Further Education, Employment, Scienceand Technology.2011 has been an exciting and challenging year with thecommencement of transformational reforms to SouthAustralia’s training system through Skills for All. The reforms,when fully implemented, will see funding for an extra100 000 training places, the removal of fees for manycourses, better access to training for many students and atraining system that will be able to respond more quickly tostudent and industry demand.In 2011 DFEEST implemented a number of major initiativesto progress the Skills for All reforms. The centre will be a state-of-the-art facility incorporating the main building trades with a focus on sustainable industriesThe Office of TAFE SA was established to help prepare and clean technologies. The design was developed duringTAFE SA for the new contestable VET sector from 2011 with construction work to commence in 2012.July 2012. In addition, the implementation of 24 othermajor reform projects commenced including the Throughout 2011 TAFE SA continued its focus onassessment of Skills for All providers which will help providing excellence in training to students from all walksunderpin the quality of training that occurs under of life. More than 81 000 students received training duringSkills for All. 2011. Over 91 percent of TAFE SA graduates were satisfied with the overall quality of their training, the highestA major initiative was the introduction of the Training satisfaction rating nationally.Guarantee for South Australian Certificate of Education(SACE) Students which helps fund students to undertake Employers also gave very positive feedback with overvocational training while at school and upon completion of 90 percent extremely satisfied with the quality of trainingtheir SACE guarantees an ongoing training place. This being delivered by TAFE SA.scheme will be expanded in 2012 with increasing interestfrom schools and students. It was a great honour that this high standard of training was recognised at the 2011 National Training Awards withI am very pleased and proud of what staff across the TAFE SA Regional winning the award as Large Trainingdepartment have achieved to date, and look forward to Provider of the Year.seeing the culmination of these efforts when Skills for Allgoes fully live on 2 July 2012. The department also received recognition for the excellence of its work through the 2011 Premier’s Awards.In April, Adjunct Professor Don Bursill commenced hisappointment as Chief Scientist for South Australia and has The first award was for the collaborative work DFEEST didbeen working with the department and key stakeholders in with AdamMax to provide wireless broadband to fix 50,000strengthening the links between research and industry. broadband blackspots across the state.In August, the Minister for Science and Information The second Premier’s Award was for the initiative ‘RemoteEconomy launched A Science, Technology, Engineering Indigenous Public Access Project – Oodnadatta’.and Mathematics (STEM) Skills Strategy for South Australia . None of this would have been possible without theThe STEM Skills Strategy is targeted at increasing the uptake dedication and hard work of many staff and the leadershipin science, technology, engineering and mathematics of our Ministers in 2011 - Minister Snelling, Ministerprofessions to support the growing demand in our high Kenyon and Premier Weatherill.value emerging industries.During 2011 the department also progressed work on theexciting new $105 million Sustainable Industries Education Raymond GarrandCentre at Tonsley Park. Chief Executive Page 9
  10. 10. 1.3 At A Glance : Highlights of 2011 - 123 800 South Australian students participated in accredited training - 34 400 Apprentices and Trainees participated in training (as at 30 June 2011) - People in Training a 3.9 percent increase on the previous year’s figure - More than 81 000 students were enrolled in TAFE SA - Over $150 million of Commonwealth funding supported South Australian Commonwealth and State employment and training outcomes Relations - The National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development: Equity and Foundation Skills, driven by DFEEST, was embedded in national policy - Over 1500 people were engaged in community consultations - The Training Guarantee for SACE Students commenced - Learner Support Services trials commenced in TAFE SA Skills for All - Over 1400 subsidised courses have been identified for inclusion on the Subsidised Training List - The Adult Community Education program was expanded to increase learner pathways - Skills for Jobs 2011, a five-year skills and workforce development plan, was launched Training and Skills - Two regional visits, Whyalla and the Riverland, were undertaken Commission - A workforce study on Eyre Peninsula mining projects was released - TAFE SA achieved 91 percent student satisfaction - The $9.4 million Victor Harbor campus was opened and awarded a Civic Trust Award - Construction of the Sustainable Industries Education Centre is one step closer TAFE SA - The new $20.4 million Student Information System was implemented - TAFE SA shone at South Australian Training Awards with TAFE SA Regional winning Large Training Provider of the YearPage 10
  11. 11. YEAR IN REVIEW - South Australia exceeded National Partnership Agreement targets - $51 million invested for Existing Workers with 14 000 existing worker enrolments approvedProductivity Places Program - $16 million invested for Job Seekers with 5 420 job seeker enrolments approved - A $4.5 million boost was allocated to the South Australian Defence industry - $4.6 million was invested to fund 1 223 qualifications in mining - Outback Connect won two Premier’s Awards for AdamMax – Shining the Light on Broadband Blackspots and Remote Indigenous Public Access Project – Oodnadatta Digital Economy and - The National Broadband Network arrived in Willunga with the highest take-up of Technology any region - Port Pirie received a $112 000 boost for broadband services - $5 million invested in a purpose-built Photonics Facility Science and Research - SA STEM Skills Strategy launched - Professor Don Bursill was announced as the new Chief Scientist for South Australia - Over 11 000 people participated in 93 Adult Community Education (ACE) programs delivered by 70 community-based organisations South Australia Works - $6.4 million invested will support 8800 people through South Australia Works - $2.4 million invested in the ACE program to increase learner pathways - $2.6 million of Commonwealth funding was secured for more training and jobs Aboriginal Training and - $1 million funding offered to assist Aboriginal job seekers Employment - Industry Clusters supported 285 Aboriginal people into training or employment - The amended Training and Skills Development Act 2008 was implemented to strengthen regulation Quality - The Vocational Education and Training (Commonwealth Powers) Bill drafted and submitted to Parliament - An International Student Card was launched with SAPOL Page 11
  12. 12. 1.4 Skills for All Skills for All, announced in late December 2010, is the MORE SUPPORT FOR THE MOST DISADVANTAGED strategic direction for VET in South Australia. The South Australian government will encourage more people than ever to enter training, successfully complete Implementation is planned over four years. When fully that training and gain employment. To achieve this, implemented, Skills for All will bring fundamental changes additional learner support services, which will include to the state’s training system in order to: specialised learning and workplace experience, was trialled - raise the skills level of South Australians for the most disadvantaged. Examples of disadvantaged groups include women returning to work and those facing - increase the number of South Australians with post- generational unemployment. school qualifications - increase workforce participation. Certificate I and II level training, and foundation skills will be fully funded with no course fees, and further concessions To support Skills for All, the South Australian government will continue to be available at Certificate III and IV level for committed an additional $194 million and set an ambitious low-income earners. goal as part of its Jobs Strategy which, with the Productivity Places Program (PPP), to create 100 000 new jobs for the IMPROVED PATHWAYS INTO LEARNING AND WORK state over the six years from 2010-11. Skills for All recognises the importance of ensuring foundation skills are readily accessible to support those In order to achieve this goal, an additional 100 000 training who may experience barriers to training and employment. places in key growth industries has been committed over six years. The state government has doubled funding for foundation skills and committed $6.4 million for the Adult Community The aim is to create a VET system that responds quickly and Education (ACE) sector to create an additional 6000 flexibly to the needs of individuals and industry; a system training places for South Australians who want to boost which is simpler to access and navigate, and supports their literacy and numeracy skills in order to move on to more people to enter training and progress to higher higher level training or find work. qualifications and employment. Pathways from school to further training have also been Key aspects of the reform will be in place by 2 July 2012. improved. The training system now supports school students 16 years and over who are on a VET pathway GOVERNMENT-FUNDED TRAINING PLACES and provides access to the training subsidy for further South Australians aged 16 years and over will be eligible training once they complete school. for a government-funded training subsidy to meet individual needs and industry demand. A SHARED INVESTMENT IN SKILLS The funding structure is being simplified. The overall CLIENT CHOICE OF TRAINING PROVIDER funding provided by government is increasing. There will Students will be able to select the training provider of their be a greater sharing of the costs for higher level training choice from TAFE SA and other approved private training for which, at Diploma and Advanced Diploma levels, providers. To assist South Australians in selecting the providers will be able to offer income-contingent loans. training and provider that is right for them, Skills for All will Maximum and minimum restrictions on course fees will focus on developing resources and information that will prevent providers from overcharging students, while give people access to high-quality information on careers, ensuring that providers cannot offer training at artificially training options and providers. low prices. CLIENTS WILL BE WELL INFORMED MORE SUPPORT FOR INDUSTRY The Skills for All website will build a training information Employers can also access government-endorsed, portal that offers information about Skills for All providers, independent workforce development advisors to help their services and funded training courses. It will link South identify workforce development needs and broker relevant Australians to high-quality information and tools on training and support. careers, occupations and training pathways at one up-to- date and easy-to-navigate website. Skills for All implementation has made good progress and is on track for the 2 July 2012 starting date.Page 12
  13. 13. YEAR IN REVIEWAN ASSURANCE OF QUALITY A RENEWED PARTNERSHIP WITH INDUSTRYFrom 2012, South Australia will be part of the National VET Under Skills for All, the South Australian government willRegulation system, and will work cooperatively with the work with industry to promote workforce development,Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA). Training maximise investment in training and encourage moreproviders wishing to access public funding will need to people to gain skills through training throughout theirmeet rigorous criteria to become a Skills for All provider. working lives.The requirements are in addition to meeting the standardsunder the Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF) Skills in the Workplaceand may mean that not all currently registered trainingproviders will be able to access public funding. This will The Skills in the Workplace program will allow employers inresult in training providers that meet the highest standards key target industries to co-invest with government toof quality for students to ensure that South Australia retains improve the skill level of employees at higher qualificationits reputation for high-quality education and training. levels and support workforce development.From 2012, the Tertiary Education Quality Standards Skills in the Workplace will offer contestable fundingAgency (TEQSA) will have national responsibility for higher designed to raise the skill levels of existing workers and toeducation provision. address skill demands in key industry sectors. Employer commitment and investment will be key requirements ofEMPLOYER RECOGNITION PROGRAM Skills in the Workplace, and government investment in the program will add to, not replace, enterprise investment inDFEEST will establish a new Employer Recognition workforce skills development.Program that publicly acknowledges the critical roleemployers and businesses play in meeting skill needs anddeveloping the workforce. This new program will help torecognise and reward employers and to assist in thecontinued development of a culture of training in SouthAustralia. Page 13
  14. 14. 1.5 TAFE SA As South Australia’s largest provider of VET, TAFE SA plays a TAFE SA was also awarded, or contributed to the awarding major role in providing a comprehensive range of courses of the following: to industry, the community and disadvantaged groups. Together, the three TAFE institutes of Adelaide North, - TAFE SA was awarded the National Excellence Award Adelaide South and Regional play a critical role in delivering for Outstanding Contribution to Indigenous on South Australian government priorities, including the Interpreting by the Australian Institute of Interpreters facilitation of an additional 100 000 training places over six and Translators for its delivery of the Diploma in years. Interpreting in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands and other parts of South Australia In 2011, TAFE SA delivered training to over 81 000 students in more than 800 courses across 50 campuses. - A South Australian apprentice carpenter, trained by TAFE SA, was judged as the best apprentice and TAFE SA achieved the highest satisfaction ratings nationally winner of the National Apprentice Carpenter of with over 91 percent of TAFE SA graduates satisfied with the Year the overall quality of their training (National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) 2011), and - TAFE SA’s Regency International Centre was awarded 95 percent of TAFE SA graduates would recommend the the Servicing Industry Award at the South Australian training they undertook to other people. Premier’s Food Industry Awards which recognises a business for outstanding and innovative service. The A total of 91 percent of employers are satisfied with the centre also won the bronze medal in the Tourism quality of training delivered by TAFE SA to apprentices and Education and Training category at the 2011 South trainees, and 94 percent are satisfied with the quality of Australian Tourism Awards nationally recognised training delivered by TAFE SA (NCVER 2011). - An apprentice from Mount Gambier won a bronze medal at the 41st WorldSkills International Competition The Office of TAFE SA commenced operation in July 2011 held in London as an interim arrangement to progress TAFE SA priorities and to assist TAFE SA to become increasingly independent - A TAFE SA Building Lecturer won the 2011 SafeWork and accountable in preparation for autonomy as a award for the Best Individual Contribution to statutory authority. Ms Elaine Bensted, the Chief Executive, Workplace Health and Safety for his submission on the Office of TAFE SA has been reporting to the TAFE SA 3M™ Peltor™ Lite-Com III™ communication headset Interim Board since July 2011 and held to account for the which controls hazardous noise and has improved outcomes against the Ministerial Charters and Institute safety for lecturers and students. The TAFE SA Building Performance Agreements. program is believed to be the first educational institution in Australia to have used this cutting-edge Fortnightly video-conferences were held for all staff to technology in the form of two-way communication ensure that changes as a result of Skills for All are well headsets to allow lecturers to effectively and safely understood by staff. Campus forums have also been held to communicate with their students in a high-noise provide opportunities for staff to engage in discussion. All training environment areas of TAFE SA’s business are being reviewed to ensure they are appropriate with the move into a new funding - A Glass Glazing Lecturer at Marleston campus won the model in 2012. Glass Glazing Association of South Australia 2011 South Australian Glass Person of the Year Award - TAFE SA Beer brand ‘Campus Brewery’ won two silver Recognition and Awards medals at the 2011 Australian International Beer South Australia was well represented at the 2011 Australian Awards for the beers ‘Nut Brown’ and ‘American Training Awards, with eleven nominations, including six Brown Ale’. These awards showcase premium beer relating to TAFE SA. TAFE SA Regional won the Large and brewing excellence in the Asia-Pacific region. Training Provider of the Year and a TAFE SA student won Vocational Student of the Year. Murray Bridge Veterinary Clinic won Small Employer of the Year with accredited training provided by TAFE SA. TAFE SA was also the national runner-up in both of the VET Teacher/Trainer of the Year and Australian School-based Apprentice of the Year categories.Page 14
  15. 15. YEAR IN REVIEWPlans for 20122012 is a very important year for TAFE SA, with significant TAFE SA will continue to set the benchmark in Australia inchanges being undertaken in the vocational education and terms of student satisfaction and employment outcomes,training system in South Australia as the Skills for All reforms and continue to play a central role in the state’sare introduced. development.TAFE SA as South Australia’s largest provider will play a TAFE SA fosters productivity, prosperity and social inclusioncritical role in progressing these reforms and 2011 has through skills development for individuals and industry as abeen a year for TAFE SA to ensure it is ready to effectively state government owned entity. TAFE SA will continue tooperate in a more competitive demand-driven market. deliver on its goals by:Legislation will be introduced in 2012 to establish TAFE SA - delivering training that provides students everyas a Statutory Authority. This will give TAFE SA greater opportunity to achieve their personal, educationalautonomy, increased capacity to respond to market needs, and career goalsand the opportunity to attract more funding and grow in - engaging with employers, industry and thewhat will be a much bigger training system . community to continue developing the highlyDuring 2012, TAFE SA will strengthen relationships with skilled workforce they needindustries and engagement with employers to deliver the - ensuring our products and services meet theeducation and training required to develop the highly diverse needs of our students and industryskilled workforce needed by current and emergingindustries. - prioritising resources to support our vision, meet market expectations and implement contemporaryWith the proposed changes, work will continue for methodologies and technologiesTAFE SA to remain South Australia’s largest provider of - building relationships to guarantee ourvocational education and training and will continue to offer educational delivery is meaningful and currenta diverse range of courses, including building, constructionand furnishing, manufacturing, engineering and transport, - working with ACE providers to support Southcommunity services and health, hospitality and tourism, Australians needing foundation skills.business and finance and primary industries, food TAFE SA looks forward to working with students, staff,and wine. employers, industry and its many stakeholders during 2012 and in the future. Vanessa Corbell - a TAFE SA Floristry student won the State and National Oasis Designz Cup competitions Page 15
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  17. 17. SECTION TWO ABOUT THE DEPARTMENTPage 17
  18. 18. 2.1 Our PrioritiesThrough skills and innovation, DFEEST provides the OUR VISIONunderpinning elements for a strong sustainable economy South Australia has the best workforce in Australia.for South Australia, achieved through greater participationand productivity from our workforce. OUR MISSIONDFEEST’s priorities include ensuring South Australia hasexemplary workforce planning and development practices; To develop the skills and capability of the state’s workforcestrong industry partnerships; increased participation in and to maximise the opportunities for all South Australians tolearning and work; a state with high quality and excellence engage in work.in tertiary education and training; supporting the state’senvironmental sustainability through the development of Our actions to achieve this mission include:skills and technology; supporting world competitive research - supporting the Training and Skills Commissionand uptake of new technologies and innovation; all with a (TaSC) in providing strategic advice andcontinued emphasis on quality and high performance. recommendations to the government on priorities and actions to increase the skills base of theSupporting the South Australian government’s agenda in workforceareas such as Information and Communication Technology(ICT) infrastructure, and the rollout of the National - working with industry, employers, business andBroadband Network (NBN) in identified regions of the state across government to develop the highly skilledis a continuing priority of DFEEST. workforce needed by current and emerging industriesIn preparation for the ongoing implementation of Skills for - building on our past successes to propel the stateAll from 2012, the process for identifying and developing its forward with an education and training system thatstrategic direction was a major priority throughout 2011. is more responsive to industry demandsSkills for All, the department’s strategic direction for VET, willposition the sector to respond quickly and flexibly to the skill - exploiting opportunities which put South Australianeeds of industry and individuals. This includes ensuring that at the national forefront of research andTAFE SA has appropriate governance and funding technology, and innovation developmentarrangements in place so that it is well prepared for changes - creating more opportunities for Aboriginal people,to the way in which VET is delivered in South Australia. young people, people with disabilities and older people to participate in the workforce and in their communities.Page 18
  19. 19. ABOUT THE DEPARTMENTOUR VALUESDFEEST is striving to become a high-performance learning Openness in decision making by:organisation which attracts, develops and retains a highly - providing reasons for our decisionstalented workforce. The department will only achieve thisthrough a strong commitment to our people and core - restricting information only in the public interestvalues. We will demonstrate this through: and preservation of personal privacy - resolving conflictsRespect for: - being transparent. - the values, beliefs, customs and cultures of individuals and our community Striving for excellence in: - others’ rights, responsibilities and professionalism. - the efficient and effective use of public resourcesResponsiveness in: - environmental sustainability - providing timely and caring services - embedding equality of access and opportunity - generating innovative and creative - treating people fairly shared solutions - standards of service. - embracing change that improves our effectiveness and efficiency Courage in: - recognising and celebrating effort and achievement. - challenging and being challenged - taking risks - doing things in different ways - taking responsibility for mistakes and learning from them - enforcing our code of conduct. The key priorities for the Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology in 2011 centred on the department’s Strategic Plan 2010-2014 and directly reflected the vision, mission and values of South Australia’s Strategic Kristal West - Plan targets. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Student of the Year 2011 South Australian Training Awards Page 19
  20. 20. 2.2 Our Structure PRODUCTIVITYIn order to successfully respond to the objectives of One of the focuses for Skills for All is the need for industry toSkills for All, and to strengthen capacity in science, research increase its productivity through co-investment in trainingand technology, the structure within the department and workforce development. This is ideally achievedrequired transformation. through a renewed partnership with education providers, industry, unions, the community and individuals.The organisational restructure was fundamentally aboutrefocusing the department to deliver on the new policy The application of science, research, innovation and digitaldirection and approach in Skills for All and to deliver on the technologies will also be critical determinants of futureMinister’s agenda for advancing science, technology, productivity and growth.engineering and mathematics (STEM) skills as well as forscience, research and technology. The following directorates are grouped under the Productivity stream:The realignment of activities also provided an opportunityto achieve administrative efficiencies, minimise duplication, - Traineeship and Apprenticeship Servicesimprove systems and processes and, where possible, - Industry Skills Developmenteconomies of scale in areas such as contract management - Digital Economy and Technologyand administration to achieve significant budget savings. - Quality, Tertiary Education, Science and ResearchSkills for All is making significant changes to South (QTESR) (specifically STEM and scienceAustralia’s VET system, and TAFE SA, the state’s public and research).training provider is changing too. Skills for All gives TAFE SAgreater autonomy along with increased capacity torespond to changing market needs. PARTICIPATIONWith TAFE SA having greater autonomy through the Officeof TAFE SA, and in the future as a statutory authority, there Skills for All proposes fundamental changes to the waywas a need to reconfigure DFEEST Corporate, both in training is accessed. A new directorate, Skills SA, wasterms of its relationship with TAFE SA as well as in terms of formed to deliver on Skills for All reforms. Skills SA has aworking across the training system, with all education dedicated team of staff to ensure stakeholders have accesssectors, industry and employers. to high-quality consumer information on careers and training options. The focus initially is on provision of betterThe organisational restructure, and the corresponding information to allow a demand-driven model to functionchanges in the way that DFEEST operates, was designed to and then investment in systems to administer and allocateensure that the department could deliver on Skills for All funding based on student demand and industry needs.objectives and requirements. Initial structural changes weremade from 1 July 2011. The department has a focus on increasing the participation of South Australians in learning, training and work, inThe DFEEST Corporate structure has been developed particular people experiencing barriers and disadvantage inaround three themes which inform functional groupings: the labour market. - Productivity Directorates under the Participation stream include: - Participation - QTESR (specifically quality of training providers - Policy and Corporate Support. through contracting and support for professional development) - Skills SA - Participation and Equity.Page 20
  21. 21. ABOUT THE DEPARTMENTPOLICY AND CORPORATE SUPPORTStrategic Policy, Resources and Corporate Services Corporate Communications andFinance Skills for All will require changes to the MarketingThe key objective of the Strategic tools, resources and infrastructure Corporate Communications andPolicy, Resources and Finance area is required to support the new student- Marketing is responsible for managingto ensure highest quality business, centred demand-driven training the communications and marketingeconomic and labour market analysis system. This will require enhanced needs of DFEEST and for providingto support prompt and informed information management systems strategic media and communicationsresource allocation by the Chief configured to new funding models. advice to the Chief Executive and theExecutive and DFEEST executives, With new systems comes an Minister.thereby focusing alignment between opportunity to review and consolidateDFEEST programs and pursuit of contract management and The role includes responding tostrategic targets (both for DFEEST administrative functions. Corporate requests from the media, and initiatingand SASP). Services had previously undergone a contact with the media to announce major review to develop a preferred and promote initiatives of DFEEST andStrategic policy, review and evaluation structure that will provide the optimal TAFESA. It also includes providingare brought together in a single systems and arrangements to deliver advice on the development and usedirectorate to provide strong on the Skills for All reforms and of social media, monitoring trends inintegration between policy and achieve efficiencies. communications and marketing, andevaluation, and some economies of managing and marketing events suchscale. Individual directorates are For more information about as the South Australian Trainingresponsible for operational policy, Corporate Governance, please refer to Awards and the South Australianoperational review and evaluation as page 87. Science Excellence Awards.it relates to implementation. Page 21
  22. 22. 2.3 South Australia’s Strategic PlanSouth Australia’s Strategic Plan (SASP) outlines a medium tolong-term course for the whole of South Australia, and setsout targets under interrelated objectives.At the start of 2011, DFEEST was the lead agencyresponsible for 14 targets, under the objectives: growingprosperity; fostering creativity and innovation; andexpanding opportunity.OBJECTIVE – GROWING PROSPERITYT1.10 Jobs: Better the Australian average employment T4.10 Australian Government resources: Secure growth rate by 2014. (Now target T47). Australian Government research and development resources to 10 percent aboveT1.11 Unemployment: Maintain equal or lower than South Australia’s per capita share by 2010 the Australian average through to 2014. and increase this share to 25 percent by (Now target T49). 2014, for both public and private spheres.T1.12 Employment participation: Increase the T4.11 Business expenditure: Increase business employment to population ratio, standardised expenditure on research and development to for age differences, to the Australian average. 1.5 percent of GSP in 2010 and increase to 1.9 percent by 2014. (Now target T98).T1.26 Aboriginal unemployment: Reduce the gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal unemployment rates each year. (Now target T51). OBJECTIVE – EXPANDING OPPORTUNITYT1.16 Share of overseas students: Double South Australia’s share of overseas students by 2014. (Now target T90). T6.15 Learning or earning: By 2010, increase the number of 15-19 year olds engaged full-time in school, work or further education/trainingOBJECTIVE – FOSTERING CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION (or combination thereof) to 90 percent. (Now target T54).T4.6 Commercialisation of research: Increase gross revenues received by South Australian-based T6.19 Non-school qualifications: By 2014, equal or research institutions from licences, options, better the national average for the royalty agreements, assignments, licensed proportion of the labour force with technology and patents by 2010. non-school qualifications. (Now target T95). (Now target T91). T6.20 Higher education: Increase South Australia’sT4.8 Broadband usage: Broadband usage to proportion of higher education students to exceed the Australian national average by 7.5 percent of the national total by 2014. 2010, and be maintained thereafter. (Now target T93). (Now target T57). T6.21 VET participation: Exceed the nationalT4.9 Public expenditure: By 2010, public average for VET participation by 2010. expenditure on research and development as a proportion of GSP, to match or exceed average investment compared to other Australian states. (Now target T96).Page 22
  23. 23. ABOUT THE DEPARTMENTRELAUNCH OF THE SASPThe 2011 update of the SASP included 100 targetsrestructured to reflect the visions shared by all SouthAustralians across six priority areas of community,prosperity, environment, health, education and ideas.Since November 2011, DFEEST has had lead responsibilityfor 17 of the 100 targets detailed in the Plan in the areas ofprosperity, education and ideas. While many of thedepartment’s targets have been amended, five new targetshave been assigned:T48 Ageing workforce participation: Increase the proportion of older South Australians who are engaged in the workforce by 10 percentage points by 2020.T50 People with disability: Increase by 10 percent the number of people with a disability employed in South Australia by 2020.T55 Apprentices: Increase the number of apprentice completions in trade occupations by 20 percent by 2020.T58 Online business: Increase the proportion of businesses that receive orders online from 24 percent to 40 percent by 2014 and continue growth each year to 2020.T92 Science, technology, engineering and mathematics qualifications: Increase the number of domestic students completing undergraduate qualifications in specified science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields of education by 15 percentage points to 3 600 students per annum by 2020. Page 23
  24. 24. 2.4 Our Five Year Strategic Plan 2010-14The department’s Five Year Strategic Plan 2010-14, releasedin May 2010, provides the strategic direction for thedepartment. The plan maps out seven clear goals that linkto SASP targets, and which focus on:1. EXEMPLARY WORKFORCE PLANNING AND 3. HIGH LEVELS OF PARTICIPATION AND ACHIEVEMENTDEVELOPMENT IN LEARNING AND WORKOur future workforce will be built through a world-class Investing in education, skills and training that leads tosystem of workforce planning and development based on secure, well-paid jobs is essential to the state’s futureunderstanding and responding to both industry and prosperity through increased productivity, workforceindividual demand. participation and social inclusion.Links to SASP Targets T1.10, T1.11, T1.12, T1.26, T6.15, Links to SASP Targets T1.16, T6.15, T6.19, T6.20 and T6.21.T6.19, T6.20 and T6.21. 4. EXCELLENCE IN TERTIARY EDUCATION AND TRAINING2. STRONG INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS Building the capability, quality and capacity of the VET andStrong partnerships ensure employers have people with higher education systems to meet the demands ofthe right skills at the right time to increase productivity in a individuals and of industry to address South Australia’srapidly changing and higher skilled economy. future labour supply requirements.Links to SASP Targets T1.10, T1.11, T1.12, T1.26, T4.6, T4.8, Links to SASP Targets T1.10, T6.15, T6.16, T6.19, T6.20T4.9, T4.10, T4.11, T6.15, T6.19, T6.20 and T6.21. and T6.21.Page 24
  25. 25. ABOUT THE DEPARTMENT5. WORLD COMPETITIVE RESEARCH, TECHNOLOGY AND 7. DFEEST IS A HIGH-PERFORMANCE ORGANISATIONINNOVATION DFEEST is a highly skilled organisation that provides responsive, effective and efficient services to industry, smallThe state’s prosperity, economic growth, environmental and medium enterprises, individuals, the community andsustainability and social wellbeing are underpinned by the the government.discovery and application of knowledge to create new andbetter products, and smarter processes and systems. Links to SASP Targets T1.7, T1.8, T1.9, T2.7, T2.11, T2.12, T3.13 and T4.8.Links to SASP Targets T4.6, T4.8, T4.9, T4.10 and T4.11.6. SKILLS AND TECHNOLOGY FOR THE STATE’SENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITYThe long-term economic prosperity of South Australia isinextricably connected to environmental sustainability,investments in research and technological innovations andin building the skills for sustainable development; thesethings are essential to secure business and employmentopportunities from innovative green industries and services.Links to SASP Targets T3.7, T4.6, T4.7, T4.9, T4.10 and T4.11. Page 25
  26. 26. Joshua Konc - Apprentice of the Year 2011 South Australian Training AwardsPage 26
  27. 27. SECTION THREE OUR PERFORMANCEPage 27
  28. 28. 3.1 Workforce PlanningDFEEST Strategic Plan Goal 1DFEEST continued to refine workforce modelling in Skills for Jobsconjunction with the TaSC as follows: In early December 2011 the TaSC released its annual - supported targeted industries to develop update of the five-year plan for skills and workforce workforce plans development, Skills for Jobs. The plan showed that job openings over the period 2009-10 to 2014-15 will total - facilitated the development and launch of the approximately 163 000, comprising of 69 000 new jobs Resources Industry Workforce Action Plan in due to economic growth and 94 000 due to replacement conjunction with Resources and Energy of those leaving the workforce. Skills Australia - supported the early childhood development The total demand for qualifications over this period is workforce through an analysis of their workforce estimated to reach 299 000 - 95 000 of which are at the requirements, and informed the State Migration Bachelor degree or higher; 51 000 at the Plan through analysis and modelling of Advanced Diploma/Diploma level; 44 000 at the Certificate relevant data. IV level and 70 000 at the Certificate III level.However, more and better job opportunities are vital if The plan was again developed following extensivepeople are to lead fulfilling, independent lives and generate consultation with industry and regional stakeholders, andfuture opportunities. Being employed affects income, living includes a detailed analysis on the demand forstandards, welfare dependency, social inclusion and social qualifications associated with specialist occupations. Theconnectedness, and through them, social and economic plan identifies 87 specialist occupations in South Australia,wellbeing, for both individuals and their family members 2. around one-quarter of all occupations in the state. The skills for these occupations are highly specialised and oftenWhile strong jobs growth is a sign of a strong and require extended learning over several years. TaSC’sprosperous economy, the quality of available jobs is analysis shows that 33 of these specialist occupations areincreasingly important. Higher skilled jobs provide higher likely to have insufficient supply of qualifications over theincomes and greater security for the people who five-year period. This information will be used by DFEEST inhold them. devising its eligible qualifications list and caps and incentives regime under Skills for All reforms.DFEEST also continued to work with a number of industriesconcerning their workforce planning and development The 2011 plan also highlighted the participation challengeneeds. During the year, DFEEST supported the workforce facing South Australia and urged the government toplanning activities of a number of industries, including address this challenge through targeting its Skills for Alltransport and logistics, telecommunications, early investment in areas such as foundation skills, adultchildhood, defence and mining industries. community education, and wrap-around services for those who face barriers to training and work.DFEEST continued to coordinate and facilitate jointactivities with the network of industry skills boards whichprovided opportunities to work through policy issueswith industries.As part of Skills for All, employers will be able to accessgovernment-endorsed, independent workforcedevelopment advisors to help identify workforcedevelopment needs and broker relevant trainingand support. 2 ABS 2010, Year Book Australia, 2009-10, cat. no. 1301.0, ABS, Canberra cited in ABS 4125.0 - Gender Indicators, Australia, July 2011Page 28
  29. 29. OUR PERFORMANCEPlans for 2012As the government transfers its regulatory powers over to In 2012 the TaSC will continue to hold regional visitsASQA in VET and Tertiary Education Quality and Standards following its successful visits to Whyalla and the RiverlandAgency (TEQSA) in higher education in 2012 the TaSC will during 2011. During 2012 the TaSC will also advise thecontinue to advise the Minister on the extent to which Minister on how the state can maximise employmentSkills for All produces quality vocational outcomes. The TaSC participation from the mining expansion, particularly forwill also encourage industry to embrace Skills for All and regional communities.partner with government to invest in workforce planningand training. 15 Percent Workforce Participation in Government Construction Procurement From 1 January 2011, government construction contracts require the contractor to ensure that 15 percent of the onsite labour hours on major government building and civil infrastructure projects are undertaken by apprentices, trainees, Aboriginal people and local people who have barriers to employment. DFEEST is working with contractors to provide assistance to meet compliance obligations through measures such as South Australia Works, Skills in the Workplace and Indigenous programs. Projects signed in 2011, and that fall within scope, include DFEEST’s Sustainable Industries Education Centre (SIEC) and the Adelaide Oval Redevelopment. Other projects that were signed prior to 1 January 2011, such as the Seaford Rail Extension and the South Road SuperWay have participation targets built into their contracts. DFEEST’s South Australia Works regional coordinators are working with these contracts to identify training and employment services that will assist them to meet their targets. Women Influencing Defence and Resources Industry project DFEEST collaborated with the defence and resources sectors to foster a community of practice with over 150 women. The Women Influencing Defence and Resources Industry project provided programs aimed at supporting the attraction and retention of female employees in the two industry sectors. Participants attended professional development in leadership and mentoring and were provided with networking opportunities. Page 29
  30. 30. Employment Growth The current annual employment growth rate at December 2011 was 0.6 percent in South Australia and 0.1 percent at the national level. At the same time, South Australia’s labour force participation rate was 63.3 percent. Figure 1: Trend total employment growth Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Cat No 6202.0 Figure 2: Labour force participation 66% 65% 64% 63% 63.2% 62% Dec 2011 Projected 61% (Target 65.4 at Jan 2012 ) Trend (Jan 2001 - Dec 2011) 60% 59% 58% Jan-01 Jan-02 Jan-03 Jan-04 Jan-05 Jan-06 Jan-07 Jan-08 Jan-09 Jan-10 Jan-11 Jan-12 Jan-13 Jan-14 Jan-15 Jan-16 Source: ABS Cat No 6202.0Page 30
  31. 31. OUR PERFORMANCEYoung people full time in school, work or further education/trainingIn November 2011, 85.5 percent of young people aged 15 to 19 in South Australia were engaged full time in either studyor employment, or a combination of both. This compares to 84.8 percent at the national level. Figure 3: Youth (15-19 years) learning or earning engagement ratio Source: ABS Cat No 6202.0Unemployment rates by level of educational attainmentIn 2006, people with qualifications of Certificate III and above experienced unemployment rates considerably lower thanthose without higher level qualifications. Figure 4: Unemployment rate census 2006 Source: ABS Population Census 2006 Page 31
  32. 32. 3.2 Engagement with IndustryDFEEST Strategic Plan Goals1, 2 and 3APPRENTICES AND TRAINEESThe traineeship and apprenticeship system is an area inwhich the department directly engages with industry todevelop and maintain South Australia’s skilled workforce.DFEEST is responsible for the regulation of South Australia’straineeship and apprenticeship system, under delegationfrom the Training and Skills Commission, and for theprovision of subsidies to support the training of traineesand apprentices.Trainee and apprentice activity Traineeship and Apprenticeship Information ServiceIn 2011, more South Australians participated in the The department operates an information service to providetraineeship and apprenticeship system than ever before, advice and information on the traineeship andwith an increase in both the number of commencements apprenticeship system to trainees, apprentices, theirand completions. The number of early completions employers and the general public. In 2011, the informationalso increased. service responded to 27 341 phone calls – an average of 525 calls per week. This represents a 5.5 percent increase in - At 30 June 2011, there were an estimated 34 400 trainees and apprentices in training, a 3.9 percent calls from 2010. increase on the previous year’s figure (see Figure 5) Employer Registrations and Employer Visits - In 2010-11, there were an estimated 23 200 traineeship and apprenticeship commencements, The Training and Skills Development Act 2008 requires a 4.5 percent increase on the previous year’s employers to register prior to employing and training figure (see Figure 5) trainees and apprentices. In 2011, 2294 new employers were registered to take on trainees and apprentices. A total - An estimated total of 12 400 trainees and of 16 032 employers were registered in South Australia at apprentices completed their training in the twelve 31 December 2011. months to 30 June 2011, a 4.2 percent increase on the previous year’s figure (see Figure 5) The department works closely with employers and their - The number of existing worker commencements trainees and apprentices and conducted over 4000 and newly commencing workers both increased employer visits in 2011. in 2010-11 (see Figure 6). - The number of early completions experienced a minor increase of 0.4 percent in 2011.Page 32
  33. 33. OUR PERFORMANCEFigure 5: Trainee and apprentice activity, five years ending 30 June 2011 4 40000 35000 30000 25000 20000 In-Training 15000 Commencements Completions 10000 5000 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 YearFigure 6: Existing worker trainee and apprentice commencements compared to newly commencingworkers, five years ending 30 June 2011 4 4 Data for Figures 8 and 9 are sourced from the NCVER Australian VET statistics – Apprentices and trainees June quarter (2011) report. Data for 2011 and in training data for 2010 are estimates. The NCVER may revise these figures in the fu- ture. In training data is provided at 30 June annually; commencement and completion data are provided from the 12 months ending 30 June of each year. Page 33
  34. 34. User Choice Training Subsidies E-Training PlansThe department is responsible for the provision of User Registered Training Providers are now able to lodgeChoice training subsidies to both public and private training apprenticeship and traineeship training plans online. Onlineorganisations, to support trainees and apprentices with the lodgement has reduced red tape and improved the qualitycost of formal training. The User Choice policy has of the information available to the department.historically supported all trade qualifications, a range oftraineeships at Certificate II and III Australian Qualifications Apprenticeship Nominal TermsFramework (AQF) levels and a small number of higher leveltraineeship qualifications. As part of the South Australian DFEEST prepared a consultation paper for the TaSC thatgovernment’s election promise to support an additional was used to consult key industry stakeholders about the100 000 training places over six years and the Skills for All appropriateness of current nominal terms for twelve tradereform, User Choice funding was extended to all existing apprenticeships. The chosen trades have an earlyworker trainees undertaking Certificate III qualifications in completion rate of 40 percent or more for all completionsSeptember 2011. This was followed by the extension of over the period January 2007 to June 2010. The tradestraining subsidies to new and existing worker trainees who concerned were Bread Baker and Pastry Cook, Butcher,commenced a Training Contract from 7 December 2011 in Cook, Automotive Parts Interpreting (Specialist), Engineeringmost AQF levels II to VI qualifications. Tradesperson (Fabrication) and (Mechanical), Bricklaying, Carpentry and/or Joinery, Painting and Decorating, TilingIn 2010, 160 registered training organisations (consisting of (Wall and Floor), Hairdressing and Printing Machining. AllTAFE SA and privately owned providers) received funding have a nominal term of four years, except for Automotiveunder a User Choice agreement. A total of $42 million in Parts Interpreting (Specialist), which has a three-year term.contestable funding was provided by the department The TaSC will consider industry feedback in early 2012.during the year to support almost 22 000 trainees.As illustrated in figures 7 and 8, funding for apprentices Institution-based Trade Training Survey and Paperrepresented 56 percent of student numbers and 70 percent In 2011, DFEEST conducted a survey of institution-basedof expenditure, while funding for traineeships represented trade training learners across the state, and included the44 percent of student numbers and 30 percent of results in an information paper on institutional pathways toexpenditure. In general, apprenticeship training is more trade qualifications, prepared for the TaSC. The paper isexpensive than traineeship training due to higher intended to assist the TaSC to develop a policy position oninfrastructure costs and smaller class sizes. institution-based trade training in South Australia.Supervisor’s Guide Figure 7: Student numbersIn 2011, DFEEST launched a comprehensive informationpackage for supervisors of trainees and apprentices. Thepackage consists of a booklet and DVD designed to supportsupervisors in their day-to-day management, and enablethem to work more productively with trainees andapprentices. The Supervisor’s Guide emphasises the need toprovide pastoral support and mentoring, which researchindicates is vital to the retention of trainees and apprentices,and their completion of traineeships and apprenticeships.A copy of the Supervisor’s Guide was sent to approximately16 500 registered employers, with additional copies sent toIndustry Skills Boards and Australian Apprenticeships Figure 8: Funding ($ million)Centres. The Supervisor’s Guide has also been uploadedonto the Skills for All website, with hard copies availablefrom the department on request.Page 34
  35. 35. OUR PERFORMANCEPlans for 2012Harmonisation PhoenixIn 2011, states and territories agreed, in principle, to the Phoenix, a web-based system assisting in the managementharmonisation of training laws and administrative processes of Training Contracts, is expected to be delivered duringfor traineeships and apprenticeships by 30 June 2014. The 2012-13. This system enables training providers, employers,department has commenced work with other jurisdictions apprentices and trainees to view and manage their ownto complete Stage 1 of the implementation plan by information online.30 June 2012. The Commonwealth government hasannounced the devolvement of the management ofAustralian Apprenticeship Support Services to the states and Employer Recognition Programterritories in 2014, conditional upon the achievement In 2012 the department will implement an employerof harmonisation. recognition program as part of the Skills for All reforms. The program will encourage and reward employers with an outstanding commitment to training and workforceMentoring Apprentices and Trainees development, including apprenticeships.Research indicates that the provision of mentoring andpastoral care significantly affects the chances of anapprentice or trainee completing their qualification. DFEESTwill work with industry and employers to develop a range ofmentoring initiatives targeting disadvantaged groups, aswell as apprentices and trainees training in skillsshortage areas. Page 35
  36. 36. UPSKILLING EXISTING WORKERSJobs Strategy Projects Environmental SustainabilityAs part of its Jobs Strategy, the South Australian As part of the government’s 100 000 Jobs Strategy,government, in partnership with the Commonwealth, has $500 000 has been allocated to sustainable industriescommitted to creating 100 000 training places over six experiencing rapid growth to provide training in partyears from 2010-11, and upskilling existing workers to meet qualifications for existing workers. This includes $200 000changing workforce needs is a key part of that strategy. for Grid Connect training for solar panel installations with over 185 electricians undertaking the training. A sum ofNew industries and emerging skill demand sectors have $150 000 will assist Suzlon Energy Australia to devise winddriven the allocation of the additional training places to turbine maintenance training to support their currentensure that South Australia has the right education and workforce and $150 000 has been allocated to the Berritraining system. Barmera Council to train staff in the installation of aThe department has funded a total of 14 specific projects subsurface irrigation system across 52 hectares of councilsupporting 1018 people to gain training in a variety of parks and gardens.industry sectors.Productivity Places Program for Existing Workers Plans for 2012The PPP is a Commonwealth government initiative to Skills in the Workplace is Skills for All’s approach to tailoreddeliver $156 million of training for existing workers and job training and workforce development responses forseekers in areas of high skills demand. industry. Skills shortages in key industry sectors andIn 2011, DFEEST allocated around $44.8 million of PPP companies in the supply chains for critical projects andfunding toward almost 12 500 existing worker infrastructure investments will be targeted with trainingqualifications. Furthermore, from 1 July 2011 an additional subsidies, with small to medium-sized enterprises a$4.2 million of PPP funding supported additional User particular focus. Depending on the size of their workforce,Choice existing worker traineeship positions under businesses will be eligible for up to 90 percent of theirContracts of Training. These PPP-funded trainees are training costs towards qualifications, and skill sets, atundertaking higher level qualifications (Certificate IV and Certificate IV and above to support their employees. Bothabove) where User Choice funding would not otherwise complete qualifications and tailored combinations of unitsbe available. of competency will be funded. Program design and early implementation was completed by the end ofIndustry Partnership Program December 2011.The Industry Partnership Program concluded as anindividual program in July 2011; however it has beenabsorbed into the Skills in the Workplace program.The program worked closely with industry sectors todevelop a workforce that has the right skills, in the rightplace and at the right time by creating employment andtraining opportunities that are industry-led anddemand-driven. Skills in the WorkplaceProjects developed under the Industry Partnership Program will fund trainingbrokered and managed workforce development programs critically required bythat recruited, inducted, trained and retained industry for more thanunderemployed and/or unemployed people inSouth Australia. 2000 SA workers.Successful proposals, demonstrating matched funding fromindustry, were funded on a contractual basis.Page 36
  37. 37. OUR PERFORMANCEASSISTANCE FOR RETRENCHED WORKERSDFEEST supported 194 workers through the Retrenched As at 30 November 2011:Workers Program who were retrenched from Bridgestone - 163 workers had registered to access servicesand Kimberly-Clark Australia during 2011. - 103 accessed or are accessing training supportDFEEST is managing the Labour Market Adjustment - 32 workers who accessed training achieved fullprogram, utilising expertise in the Limestone Coast Career AQF qualificationsDevelopment Centre and the National Industry SkillsCouncil, Forestworks. - 60 individuals gained employment.Services include: - skill recognition and career planning - job search assistance - referral for skills and vocational training, as well as licences and tickets which are fully funded under the program - employment brokerage. Page 37
  38. 38. TAFE SA - INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPSTAFE SA acknowledges the important contribution industry In 2011, TAFE SA also developed and maintainedhas in assisting TAFE SA to construct and deliver VET that is relationships with:current and relevant, to develop and maintain a highly - Woolworths and Service Skills SA, with the first tenskilled workforce. Our partnerships with employers are Diploma of Retail Management PPPessential to our success. participants graduating - the Adelaide Health Service Registered TrainingOneSteel Whyalla Steelworks Organisation and the Department of Health, for the upskilling of weekly paid workers in the Certificate IIIOver many years TAFE SA has developed a close strategic and IV qualifications in healthrelationship with the OneSteel Whyalla Steelworks. Thispartnership has produced many industry-leading VET - the Repatriation General Hospital, Flinders Medicalprograms and helped to develop OneSteel’s workforce. The Centre and the Calvary Health Care Group, with‘Critical Safety Training Centre’, located at Whyalla, is a successful Productivity Places Program existingformal partnership with OneSteel who train all of their staff worker funding for the Certificate III, IV, Diplomain the facility using joint resources and staff. Another and Advanced Diploma.partnership initiative with OneSteel is the development of a‘Technician Certificate’, a tailored trade certificate not onlyproviding a customised solution, but supporting the Regional Developmentgovernment’s national agenda for higher level qualifications. The delivery of the innovative Smart E-Skills program used existing relationships with Regional Development Australia (RDA) board across the state and built further relationshipsSouth Australian Wine Industry with organisations such as Women in Business andThe South Australian wine industry is a major contributor to Regional Development in the South East of the state. Thethe state’s economy in export and tourism earnings. program was jointly marketed and provided opportunitiesTAFE SA has worked in close partnership with the industry for small to medium-sized enterprises across all industryover many years, developing a noteworthy client list sectors to develop skills in the use of the internet. Theincluding: Yalumba, Constellation Wines, Pernod Ricard, program was delivered through face-to-face workshops,Treasury Wine Estates, Peter Lehmann Wines, Vinpac one-to-one mentoring, and follow-up online services. Smart-International and Angove Family Winemakers; 95 percent of E-Skills was enthusiastically received by participants, resultingstudents enrolled in Certificate III or higher wine-related in the delivery of the program to 1174 enterprises acrossqualifications are working within the industry. Training the state.programs are customised to meet industry requirementsand currently 39 percent of training is delivered withinthe workplace. Arts The TAFE SA Adelaide College of the Arts (AC Arts) has an active industry board which represents the arts sector.Industry Reference Groups Members, appointed by the Minister and Chair, participateTAFE SA established industry reference groups regionally to in industry reference panels based on their respective areasprovide direct advice on industry skill needs (current and of knowledge. During 2011, AC Arts fostered newemerging) and the relevance and currency of training and partnership arrangements with the Australian Danceassessment processes. These groups include representatives Theatre, the State Theatre Company, Country Arts SA andfrom industry peak bodies, private registered training the Hill Smith Gallery. One key outcome was theorganisations, Job Services Australia providers, not-for-profit opportunity for TAFE SA students to partner with theorganisations and small to medium-sized enterprises. Advice Australian Dance Theatre for the performancefrom these groups provides valuable business intelligence of ‘Worldhood’.that enhances existing quality assurance strategies andensures informed decision-making processes.Page 38
  39. 39. OUR PERFORMANCEEngineering and Automotive Industries Hair and BeautyTAFE SA collaborated with Clipsal to produce a progressive The Limestone Coast Hair and Beauty Competition,electrical engineering program, teaching its apprentices to organised by TAFE SA and in its 18th year, is anotheruse the latest C-Bus Technology. C-Bus is Australia’s market- example of long-standing and successful industryleading energy management system for industrial projects engagement. Each year the competition grows inand residential homes. The TAFE SA School of Electrical participation and audience, attracting an average of 100Engineering Certificate III curriculum included a C-Bus competitors and an audience of 800. The cost of staging thecourse for the first time, with the program completed by 56 event is fully covered by sponsors and entrance fees, andapprentices as an elective unit of competency as part of the any profit is used to support students to attend the Nationalstudents’ off-the-job training. Hair and Beauty Expos.TAFE SA Automotive training introduced the latest Over 20 TAFE SA Hair and Beauty lecturers and studentstechnology and state-of-the-art equipment thanks to Toyota from metropolitan and regional campuses workedMotor Corporation Australia and Kawasaki Australia, who backstage, creating the hair and make-up looks for five ofgenerously donated vehicles to the value of over $100 000. the Adelaide Fashion Festival parades. During the festival,Two top-of-the-range vehicles, a Land Cruiser Prado Kakadu the TAFE SA Fashion program also presented three parades.and the popular Toyota Corolla Ascent, will give Certificate II Sponsored by Attitude Magazine, the parades showcasedto Diploma in Automotive Retail Services and Repair the final year Advanced Diploma of Fashion Design andstudents access to new electrical engine technology and Technology students’ graduation collection.electronic aids. A Kawasaki ER60 motorcycle that uses thelatest fuel-injected engine management system, ABS brakingsystem and cassette-type transmission was also donated.DefenceTAFE SA welcomed new families of the Australian DefenceForce to South Australia at the Defence CommunityOrganisation Welcome Expo, as part of a major relocationof the 7RAR Battalion from Darwin to Adelaide. The expoattracted over 1000 Australian Defence Force members andtheir families.Over the past two years, TAFE SA has worked with theAustralian Submarine Corporation and Air WarfareDestroyer Alliance to establish a pre-employment welderevaluation program. The innovative program wasdeveloped to identify specific skill gaps in students, and thenconducted targeted training to equip welders with the skillsneeded to gain employment in the defence industry.DesignDuring December 2011, TAFE SA Visual Merchandising staffand students spent a week at Myer City to assist in the set-upof Christmas displays within the store. This exercise involvednot only installing the décor, but also creatingmerchandising gift stories throughout a range ofdepartments. The store was later judged the ‘best presented Celebrity hairdresser and make-up artistMyer store nationally’. Dale Dorning led TAFE SA’s Hair and Beauty session styling team at the 2011 Adelaide Fashion Festival. Page 39
  40. 40. 3.3 Providing Opportunities for AllDFEEST Strategic Plan Goal 3SOUTH AUSTRALIA WORKSSouth Australia Works - Working Regions Program engaged Plans for 2012and supported people who faced barriers to learning, During the 2011-12 financial year, DFEEST will investtraining and work by delivering flexible and responsive $6.4 million to implement South Australia Works Actioninitiatives tailored to the specific needs of individuals, Plans across the whole of the state. Over 10 200 people willcommunities, regions, industries and employers. participate in SA Works regional projects. Of these, overCareer development services provided through the 5650 will participate in employment programs with overdepartment’s regional program supported and assisted 2940 gaining a job, and 4550 will progress along pathwaysindividuals to make informed choices about education, to employment, including learning, training and skillstraining and work, and facilitated planned pathways and development. Projects will provide opportunities for peoplesuccessful transitions to learning and work. to access training and a combination of case management,In 2010-11, DFEEST, through regional projects, provided mentoring and post-employment support while gainingover 7600 learning, skills development training and work valuable work experience, and benefitting from employers’opportunities to people facing difficulty entering the commitments to provide jobs.workforce, with over 3800 people gaining employment.Regional strategic planning, strengthened by thedevelopment of evidence-based three-year Strategic Plans,provided a robust response to the labour force needs oflocal labour markets. Over 800 people, includingrepresentatives from industry, communities andgovernment, attended stakeholder forums to identify priorityareas which increased participation in learning, trainingand work.In addition, DFEEST, in conjunction with CommonwealthDepartment of Education, Employment and WorkplaceRelations (DEEWR), facilitated a Regions Forum attended byover 120 regional partners and stakeholders to alignCommonwealth, state and local/regional efforts on trainingand workforce participation.DFEEST’s regional coordinators worked with the SouthAustralia Works networks to respond to each region’sunique learning, training and employment challenges. Thenetworks bring together the three tiers of government,employers, industry, education and training providers, thenon-government sector and community organisations,enabling decision-making in local communities.The establishment of six Career Development Practitionernetworks in the Barossa, Limestone Coast, Kangaroo Island,Riverland, Northern and Southern Adelaide has enhancedthe existing 17 regional career development services. Theservices support and complement the locally tailoredparticipation projects delivered in state government regions.Page 40

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