Semiotics Key Terms

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Semiotics Key Terms

  1. 1. SEMIOTIC TERMINOLOGY <ul><li>Like the name of the 80s pop idol who sang ‘Wide Boy’ you know this… </li></ul><ul><li>…and to demonstrate will now individually list the (12 or so) terms we should be using instinctively when employing semiotic analysis </li></ul><ul><li>[this signifies that you should be busily looking away from the screen and writing your answer…] </li></ul>
  2. 2. Some Key SEMIOTIC Terms <ul><li>SIGNIFIER </li></ul><ul><li>SIGNIFIED </li></ul><ul><li>DENOTE/DENOTATION </li></ul><ul><li>CONNOTE/CONNOTATION </li></ul><ul><li>BINARY OPPOSITION </li></ul><ul><li>POLYSEMY/POLYSEMIC </li></ul><ul><li>ANCHOR/ANCHORAGE </li></ul><ul><li>COMMUTATION TEST </li></ul><ul><li>NARRATIVE ENIGMA </li></ul><ul><li>3 LEVELS OF READING: </li></ul><ul><li>PREFERRED READING </li></ul><ul><li>CONTESTED or NEGOTIATED READING </li></ul><ul><li>OPPOSITIONAL READING </li></ul><ul><li>IDEOLOGY </li></ul><ul><li>DOMINANT IDEOLOGY </li></ul><ul><li>HEGEMONY </li></ul><ul><li>COUNTER-HEGEMONIC </li></ul>17. 180 ° RULE Not forgetting diegetic, juxtaposition, intertextuality, postmodern
  3. 3. I’M* GONNA TELL YOU A STORY <ul><li>WE’VE ALL DEEPLY INGRAINED OUR UNDERSTANDING OF NARRATIVE FROM THE MICRO-DRAMAS WE FILMED… </li></ul><ul><li>WHICH ROLAND BARTHES THEORY HAVE WE ALREADY MENTIONED? </li></ul><ul><li>WHICH LEVI-STRAUSS THEORY HAVE WE ALREADY MENTIONED? </li></ul><ul><li>WHICH TWO ADDITIONAL NARRATIVE THEORISTS DO WE KNOW OF? </li></ul>*NOT
  4. 4. I’M* GONNA TELL YOU A STORY <ul><li>WHICH ROLAND BARTHES THEORY HAVE WE ALREADY MENTIONED? – binary opposition </li></ul><ul><li>WHICH LEVI-STRAUSS THEORY HAVE WE ALREADY MENTIONED? – narrative enigma </li></ul><ul><li>WHICH TWO ADDITIONAL NARRATIVE THEORISTS DO WE KNOW OF? – Propp, Todorov </li></ul>*NOT
  5. 5. PROPPING UP YOUR NARRATIVE <ul><li>EXPLAIN TODOROV’S THEORY: </li></ul><ul><li>EXPLAIN PROPP’S THEORY </li></ul><ul><ul><li>LIST HIS 7 CHARACTER ARCHETYPES </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. TODOROV’S 3- or 5-PART NARRATIVE FORMULA <ul><li>Todorov is associated with the theory that every narrative can be broken down into three basic stages: situation, conflict, resolution (or equilibrium, dis-equilibrium, new equilibrium ). </li></ul><ul><li>Crucially, your protagonist is not the same as at the outset, but has been changed in some way from events. </li></ul><ul><li>Your old friend Tzvetan Todorov actually posited five stages: </li></ul><ul><li>a state of equilibrium at the outset; </li></ul><ul><li>a disruption of the equilibrium by some action; </li></ul><ul><li>a recognition that there has been a disruption; </li></ul><ul><li>an attempt to repair the disruption; </li></ul><ul><li>a reinstatement of the equilibrium [1] </li></ul><ul><li>[1] Taken from http:// www.watershed.co.uk/east/content/narrative.html You can find a much more detailed breakdown of a typical narrative at http:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propp#Narrative_Structure , a summary of Propp’s theory. </li></ul>=SITUATION =CONFLICT =RESOLUTION
  7. 7. PROPP’S ARCHETYPES <ul><li>The villain — struggles against the hero. </li></ul><ul><li>The donor — prepares the hero or gives the hero some magical object. </li></ul><ul><li>The (magical) helper — helps the hero in the quest. </li></ul><ul><li>The princess and her father — gives the task to the hero, identifies the false hero, marries the hero, often sought for during the narrative. Propp noted that functionally, the princess and the father can not be clearly distinguished. </li></ul><ul><li>The dispatcher — character who makes the lack known and sends the hero off. </li></ul><ul><li>The hero or victim/seeker hero — reacts to the donor, weds the princess. </li></ul><ul><li>False hero / anti-hero /usurper — takes credit for the hero’s actions or tries to marry the princess. [5] </li></ul>

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