RAC Data DayAnthony (Ant) BeckTwitter: AntArchRAC, Cirencester – 14th February 2012School of ComputingFaculty of Engineering
Overview•To give you a quick overview of DART•To describe our data•To make this data available to you•To describe how you ...
OverviewThere is no need to take notes:Slides –Text –http://dl.dropbox.com/u/393477/MindMaps/StandAloneJS/DataDayAtRAC.htm...
DARTwww.dartproject.infoAiming to improve the science underpining the detection ofsubsurface archaeological features
Archaeological ProspectionWhat is the basis for detection
Archaeological Prospection What is the basis for detection                            Micro-Topographic variations        ...
Why DART? ‘Things’ are not well understoodEnvironmental processesSensor responses (particularly newsensors)Constraining fa...
Why DART? Precision agriculture
Why DART? Precision agriculture
Why DART? Traditional AP exemplar
Why DART? Traditional AP exemplar
Why DART? Traditional AP exemplarSignificant bias in its application• in the environmental areas where it is  productive (...
What do we do about this?Go back to first principles:• Understand the phenomena• Understand the sensor  characteristics• U...
What do we do about this? Understand thephenomenaHow does the object generate anobservable contrast to its localmatrix?• P...
What do we do about this? Understand thephenomenaIf transitory why are theyoccurring?• Is it changes in?  • Soil type  • L...
What do we do about this? Understand therelationship between the sensor and the phenomena
What do we do about this? Understand therelationship between the sensor and the phenomena
DART at the RACInsert map here
DART                               ERT                                     Ditch                     Rob Fry       B’ham T...
DART: Probe Arrays
LiDAR
LiDAR
Aerial Imaging
Aerial Imaging
GeophysicsEarth ResistanceElectrical Resistance Tomography (ERT)Earth MagneticsGPR
Geophysics
DataAll held on a hard-drive  Subset of the full research data we will make the rest of this available throughthe serverIt...
Server (in the near future)The full project archive will be available from the server  Raw Data  Processed Data  Web Servi...
SoftwareSoftware  Proprietary    You will know what this is so I wont talk about it  Open Source    QGIS http://www.qgis.o...
Why are we doing this – spreading the love
Why are we doing this – it’s the right thing to doDART is a publically funded projectPublically funded data should provide...
Why are we doing this – IMPACT/unlocking potentialMore people use the data then there is improved impactBetter financial a...
Why are we doing this – innovationReducing barriers to data and knowledge can improveinnovation
Why are we doing this – educationTo provide baseline exemplar data for teaching and learning
Why are we doing this – building our networkFind new ways to exploit our dataDevelop contactsWrite more grant applications
What do we want from youAcknowledge our projectReference our dataThats itIt would be nice to include us in other projects ...
What do we want from youIt would be nice if you let our funding bodies know that youveused (and hopefully liked) our dataP...
What can you do with this dataAnything you want  Open Street Map  Soil monitoring  Crop analyses  Heritage  Countryside St...
What we can’t doOffer support
QuestionsOr do you want to see the data?This afternoon there is a question and answer session
RAC data day
RAC data day
RAC data day
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RAC data day

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A presentation given by Anthony Beck at the Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester on 14th February 2012. This presentation describes the data collected by the DART project and encourages members of the local communities to exploit this data.

It covers data, formats, licences, software, applications. This introductory presentation was followed up with an afternoon hands-on workshop.

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  • Image re-used under a creative commons licence: http://www.flickr.com/photos/irenicrhonda/3468242704Landscape features show up at different scalesThe archaeological record SurficialBuried Depending on scale of examination essentially invisble to the human eye
  • http://www.youtube.com/v/UfOi_7Os7kATraces can be identified through evidence Clusters of artefacts Chemical and physical residues Proxy biological variations Changes in surface relief
  • Traces can be identified through evidence Clusters of artefacts Chemical and physical residues Proxy biological variations Changes in surface relief
  • Satellite approaches should be considered in a multi-sensor environment which includes ground survey and excavationThe point is to learn more about the past
  • Image re-used under a Creative Commons licence: http://www.flickr.com/photos/san_drino/1454922072/Environmental processesSensor responses (particularly new sensors)Constraining factors (soil, crops etc.)Bias and spatial variabilityIMPACTS ONDeploymentManagement
  • Image re-used under a Creative Commons licence: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jimmysmith/720356377/Changes in land management may reduce the appearance of the phenomena we seekUsing science to maximise crop return
  • Image re-used under a Creative Commons licence: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tangyauhoong/4502062656/Actual crop returns controlled so they approximate towardsthe 'norm'NEW, i.e. not observed before, archaeology is contained within the tailsThese outlier values are being removed.The outlier is an exceptional year ;-)
  • Most successful archaeological detection technique Low level aerial platform Handheld SLR and digital cameras Reliance on oblique photography Optical and Near Infrared wavelengths Used since early 1900s
  • Reliant on specific seasonal and environmental conditions Increasingly extreme conditions are required for the detection of ‘new’ sitesLow understanding of the physical processes at play outside the visual wavelengths
  • Significant bias in its application in the environmental areas where it is productive (for example clay environments tend not to be responsive) Surveys don’t tend to be systematic Interpretation tends to be more art than science
  • Image re-used under a creative commons licence: http://www.flickr.com/photos/8203774@N06/2310292882/
  • Image re-used under a Creative Commons licence:How does the object generate an observable contrast to it's local matrix?PhysicalChemicalBiologicaletcAre the contrasts permanent or transitory?
  • Image re-used under a Creative Commons licence:If transitory why are they occurring?Is it changes in?Soil typeLand managementSoil moistureTemperatureNutrient availabilityCrop typeCrop growth stage
  • Image re-used under a Creative Commons licence:
  • Image re-used under a Creative Commons licence: DARTYou need to know when to look for the difference
  • Image reused under a Creative Commons Licence:http://www.flickr.com/photos/kubina/279523019Geotechnical analysesGeochemical analysesPlant Biology
  • By Davidjirwin1970 (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
  • http://www.youtube.com/v/Nh-ZB5bxPhcSpectral Resolution You need to know what part of the spectrum to detect the expressed difference Unsure of the geophysical metaphor for this
  • © NevitDilmen [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (w
  • RAC data day

    1. 1. RAC Data DayAnthony (Ant) BeckTwitter: AntArchRAC, Cirencester – 14th February 2012School of ComputingFaculty of Engineering
    2. 2. Overview•To give you a quick overview of DART•To describe our data•To make this data available to you•To describe how you can use this data
    3. 3. OverviewThere is no need to take notes:Slides –Text –http://dl.dropbox.com/u/393477/MindMaps/StandAloneJS/DataDayAtRAC.htmlThere is every need to ask questions
    4. 4. DARTwww.dartproject.infoAiming to improve the science underpining the detection ofsubsurface archaeological features
    5. 5. Archaeological ProspectionWhat is the basis for detection
    6. 6. Archaeological Prospection What is the basis for detection Micro-Topographic variations Soil Marks • variation in mineralogy and moisture properties Differential Crop Marks • constraint on root depth and moisture availability changing crop stress/vigour Proxy Thaw Marks • Exploitation of different thermal capacities of objects expressed in the visual component as thaw marksNow you see me dont
    7. 7. Why DART? ‘Things’ are not well understoodEnvironmental processesSensor responses (particularly newsensors)Constraining factors (soil, crops etc.)Bias and spatial variabilityTechniques are scaling!• Geophysics!IMPACTS ON• Deployment• Management
    8. 8. Why DART? Precision agriculture
    9. 9. Why DART? Precision agriculture
    10. 10. Why DART? Traditional AP exemplar
    11. 11. Why DART? Traditional AP exemplar
    12. 12. Why DART? Traditional AP exemplarSignificant bias in its application• in the environmental areas where it is productive (for example clay environments tend not to be responsive)• Surveys don’t tend to be systematic• Interpretation tends to be more art than science
    13. 13. What do we do about this?Go back to first principles:• Understand the phenomena• Understand the sensor characteristics• Understand the relationship between the sensor and the phenomena• Understand the processes better• Understand when to apply techniques
    14. 14. What do we do about this? Understand thephenomenaHow does the object generate anobservable contrast to its localmatrix?• Physical• Chemical• Biological• etcAre the contrasts permanent ortransitory?
    15. 15. What do we do about this? Understand thephenomenaIf transitory why are theyoccurring?• Is it changes in? • Soil type • Land management • Soil moisture • Temperature • Nutrient availability • Crop type • Crop growth stage
    16. 16. What do we do about this? Understand therelationship between the sensor and the phenomena
    17. 17. What do we do about this? Understand therelationship between the sensor and the phenomena
    18. 18. DART at the RACInsert map here
    19. 19. DART ERT Ditch Rob Fry B’ham TDR Imco TDR Spectro-radiometry transect
    20. 20. DART: Probe Arrays
    21. 21. LiDAR
    22. 22. LiDAR
    23. 23. Aerial Imaging
    24. 24. Aerial Imaging
    25. 25. GeophysicsEarth ResistanceElectrical Resistance Tomography (ERT)Earth MagneticsGPR
    26. 26. Geophysics
    27. 27. DataAll held on a hard-drive Subset of the full research data we will make the rest of this available throughthe serverIt contains Raw data Processed data MetadataFormats Standard interoperable formatsLicences These are not complete Most data will be made available under an open re-use licence (see server) Creative Commons GPL
    28. 28. Server (in the near future)The full project archive will be available from the server Raw Data Processed Data Web ServicesWill also include TDR data Weather data Subsurface temperature data Soil analyses spectro-radiometry transects Crop analyses Excavation data In-situ photos
    29. 29. SoftwareSoftware Proprietary You will know what this is so I wont talk about it Open Source QGIS http://www.qgis.org/ Optickshttp://opticks.org/confluence/display/opticks/Welcome+To+Opticks GRASS http://grass.fbk.eu/ The OSGeo Virtual Machine http://live.osgeo.org/en/index.html Snuffler http://www.sussexarch.org.uk/geophys/snuffler.html
    30. 30. Why are we doing this – spreading the love
    31. 31. Why are we doing this – it’s the right thing to doDART is a publically funded projectPublically funded data should provide benefit to the public
    32. 32. Why are we doing this – IMPACT/unlocking potentialMore people use the data then there is improved impactBetter financial and intellectual return for the investors
    33. 33. Why are we doing this – innovationReducing barriers to data and knowledge can improveinnovation
    34. 34. Why are we doing this – educationTo provide baseline exemplar data for teaching and learning
    35. 35. Why are we doing this – building our networkFind new ways to exploit our dataDevelop contactsWrite more grant applications
    36. 36. What do we want from youAcknowledge our projectReference our dataThats itIt would be nice to include us in other projects This is not a requirementIt would be nice if you let our funding bodies know that youveused (and hopefully liked) our data Science and Heritage Programme Prof May CassarAHRC/EPSRC Science and Heritage Programe,
    37. 37. What do we want from youIt would be nice if you let our funding bodies know that youveused (and hopefully liked) our dataProf May CassarScience and Heritage ProgrammeCentre for Sustainable Heritage,Bartlett School of Graduate Studies,University College London Jake GilmoreWC1E 6BT Communications Manager, Arts & Humanities Research Council, Polaris House, North Star Avenue, Swindon, SN2 1FL
    38. 38. What can you do with this dataAnything you want Open Street Map Soil monitoring Crop analyses Heritage Countryside Stewardship Ecological Estate Management
    39. 39. What we can’t doOffer support
    40. 40. QuestionsOr do you want to see the data?This afternoon there is a question and answer session

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