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Milking System Design and Analysis

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Dr. Roger Thomson presented this information for DAIReXNET on April 7th, 2014. You can find the recorded webinar at http://www.extension.org/pages/15830/archived-dairy-cattle-webinars.

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Milking System Design and Analysis

  1. 1. Milking System Design and Analysis Dr Roger S. Thomson MQ-IQ Consulting Intelligence for a Quality Milk Harvest
  2. 2. Milking System Design and Analysis Goals Milk clean, dry, stimulated 1. Consistently 2. Quickly 3. Comfortably 4. Completely Direct cow flow 1. Do not let the parlor run out of cows 2. Do not mix cows 3. Handle cows gently & humanely 4. Max. 3 hours / day for milking
  3. 3. Milking System Design and Analysis Reasons to Change Milking Systems 1. Improve Mastitis Control & Milk Quality 2. Improve Milking Performance (speed and completeness of milk out) 3. Decrease Energy Consumption 4. Decrease Pump Wear w/ Lower Vacuum 5. Decrease Dirt going through Regulator 6. Aesthetic or Cosmetic Reasons
  4. 4. Milking System Design and Analysis System Evaluation Frequency Annual* - complete system evaluation w/ milking time testing Biannual* - service and graph pulsators Monthly* - measure vacuum levels - perform “Unit Drop Off” test - measure Effective & Manual reserve - measure “Vacuum Regulator Efficiency” - graph pulsators * - parlors running +18 hrs/day need more frequent evaluation - parlors running 24 hrs/day = 8760 hrs/year
  5. 5. Milking System Design and Analysis System Evaluation Frequency Three Key Areas of Concern 1. Regulator / Variable Speed (VS) Drive Function 2. Pulsator Function 3. Liner Function
  6. 6. Milking System Design and Analysis Regular Maintenance Clean regulators Monthly Clean and rebuild pulsators Direct pulsators = 2500 hours Indirect pulsators = 4500 hours
  7. 7. Milking System Design and Analysis Regular Maintenance Tubing and gasket replacements Milk hoses = 6 months Twin pulsation tubes = 6 months Short pulsation tubes = 6 months Liner Replacement 1200 -10,000 milkings 90 days in small herds
  8. 8. Milking System Design and Analysis Basic Design Receiver Jar Sanitary Trap Milk Line Pulsator line Distribution Tank Air flow Air flow Air flow Vacuum Vacuum PumpHP Must slope to receiver Vacuum Regulator
  9. 9. Milking System Design and Analysis Basic Design
  10. 10. Milking System Design and Analysis Basic Design Sizing a Vacuum Pump to a Parlor 1. Basic milking system needs 35 CFM’s (a single milking unit uses between 30-40 CFM’s) (3/4” milk line inlets increases this up to 60 CFM’s) 2. Each milking unit uses approx. 2-3 CFM’s 3. Each horsepower (Hp) should produce 10 CFM’s (lobe pumps – 85% efficient)
  11. 11. Milking System Design and Analysis Steady Vacuum Level Critical Requires: 1. Regulator 2. Variable Frequency Drive (VFD)
  12. 12. Milking System Design and Analysis System Evaluations Cardinal Rule: Air In Air Out Vacuum Vacuum Dr Andy Johnson AABP Milk Quality Pre-conference Short Course
  13. 13. Milking System Design and Analysis Testing System Vacuum Levels Receiver Jar Sanitary Trap Milk Line Pulsator line Distribution Tank Air flow Air flow Air flow Vacuum Vacuum PumpHP Must slope to receiver Vacuum Regulator Vacuum Level (“ Hg) Air Flow (CFM’s)
  14. 14. Milking System Design and Analysis Milking Unit / Cluster
  15. 15. Milking System Design and Analysis Milking Claws – bottom unload; top unload; various shapes Inflations – rubber or silicone; round, triangle, square, oval narrow, medium, large or taper bore vented or non-vented Shell- metal; plastic; weighted; non-twist; reusable; throw-away
  16. 16. Milking System Design and Analysis Shut-Off – claw; milk line manual or automatic flow sensor; meter
  17. 17. Milking System Design and Analysis Pulsators -
  18. 18. Milking System Design and Analysis
  19. 19. Milking System Design and Analysis
  20. 20. Milking System Design and Analysis Pulsator Graphs
  21. 21. Milking System Design and Analysis Steady Vacuum Level Critical 3 Tests to Evaluate Air Flow Status 1. Unit Drop Off 2. Effective Reserve 3. Manual Reserve

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