Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Moving beyond openness
Jane Winters, Professor of Digital Humanities, School of Advanced
Study, University of London
OpenC...
Open access
‘By “open access” to … literature, we mean its free availability on the public
internet, permitting any users ...
By SangyaPundir (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0
(https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Findability/discoverability I
• Well-established mechanisms for finding content via
‘traditional’ publishers – combating ‘...
Findability/discoverability II
• Metadata!
• Unique and persistent identifiers
• Content available through directories and...
Accessibility
• Open access removes technical, financial and geographical
barriers to accessibility, but it’s not enough o...
Explaining your research
‘This is your opportunity to tell the story of your research, and connect
together materials from...
Interoperability
• Metadata and standards!
• Think about interoperability from the start of any research
project – it is v...
Re-usability
• Nobody likes doing it, but good documentation is essential
• The more permissive the licence the more likel...
Thank you!
• Email: jane.winters@sas.ac.uk
• Twitter: @jfwinters
• Web: digitalhistorian.org
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Jane Winters - OpenCon Oxford, 1st Dec 2017

53 views

Published on

Jane Winters, Institute of Historical Research, UCL:

This presentation will explore the ways in which openness in the publication of research articles and research data can be translated into genuine accessibility. It will use the FAIR principles for data management - findability, accessibility, interoperability and reusability - as a framework for the discussion.

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Jane Winters - OpenCon Oxford, 1st Dec 2017

  1. 1. Moving beyond openness Jane Winters, Professor of Digital Humanities, School of Advanced Study, University of London OpenCon 2017, Oxford, 1 December 2017
  2. 2. Open access ‘By “open access” to … literature, we mean its free availability on the public internet, permitting any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without financial, legal, or technical barriers other than those inseparable from gaining access to the internet itself. The only constraint on reproduction and distribution, and the only role for copyright in this domain, should be to give authors control over the integrity of their work and the right to be properly acknowledged and cited’. Budapest Open Access Initiative, 14 February 2002
  3. 3. By SangyaPundir (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
  4. 4. Findability/discoverability I • Well-established mechanisms for finding content via ‘traditional’ publishers – combating ‘habit’ • Often the subscription version of content is much easier to find than the OA version • ‘Open but invisible’ • Likely to become even more of an issue as more OA content is published
  5. 5. Findability/discoverability II • Metadata! • Unique and persistent identifiers • Content available through directories and aggregating services • But we need to take a more active role as authors and data creators • Communicate about your work
  6. 6. Accessibility • Open access removes technical, financial and geographical barriers to accessibility, but it’s not enough on its own • Research projects may develop an API, but provide no instruction for use • Data may be published online, but without documentation • What audience do you want to reach? How accessible is an academic journal article to a non-specialist audience?
  7. 7. Explaining your research ‘This is your opportunity to tell the story of your research, and connect together materials from different locations - videos, slides, data, code, press coverage, blog postings, and other publications. You can keep updating this page to reflect your ongoing research, add new materials as you create them, or demonstrate the continued relevance of your work as the field evolves. This all helps to make it easier for readers to find and understand your work.’ Kudos, 21 November 2017
  8. 8. Interoperability • Metadata and standards! • Think about interoperability from the start of any research project – it is very hard to retrofit • What are the appropriate standards for your discipline? • Identify services and resources with which you would like your data to be interoperable • Don’t try to reinvent the wheel
  9. 9. Re-usability • Nobody likes doing it, but good documentation is essential • The more permissive the licence the more likely it is that your work will be reused – but in the humanities at least, this requires major cultural change (CC-BY?) • Try not to close down options, even if you’re not sure what they are • ‘The best thing to do with your data will be thought of by someone else’ (Rufus Pollock, 2012)
  10. 10. Thank you! • Email: jane.winters@sas.ac.uk • Twitter: @jfwinters • Web: digitalhistorian.org

×