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Phase 4 Hope For Venezuelan Refugees COVID-19 Response Report

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HOPE FOR VENEZUELAN REFUGEES PROJECT
PHASE 4 COVID-19 RESPONSE REPORT
Prepared by
Cristal Montañéz Baylor, Hope For Venezu...
HOPE FOR VENEZUELAN REFUGEES PROJECT
PHASE 4 COVID-19 RESPONSE REPORT
A. Propose Performance Period Start and End Date
Ris...
3
- RHLP-1 Fundación Nueva Ilusión
- CDC-1 Comunidad Indígena Yukpa / JUCUM
Project Objective 1 Objective 1 - To provide a...
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Phase 4 Hope For Venezuelan Refugees COVID-19 Response Report

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During the reporting period, the Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Team successfully delivered the needed food commodities and PPE supplies, portable hand-wash stations, face masks, cleaning, and disinfectant supplies to help prevent the propagation of COVID-19. The team monitored and evaluated the project weekly. The meal distribution registration lists were collected and processed every two weeks by gender and age, as reflected in this report.
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Thanks to the Rise Against Hunger (RAH) COVID-19 Response Grant, and donations from the Chanhassen Rotary Foundation/Rotary Club Chanhassen and individuals, the Rotary Club of Cúcuta and Rotary e-Club of Houston Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Team, provided 162,272 hot meals and helped alleviate hunger affecting thousands of vulnerable Venezuelan refugees, migrants, walkers “caminantes,” and Colombian returnees. Our distribution of PPE supplies, disinfectant products, and thousands of face masks helped protect and prevent the propagation of COVID-19 among the volunteers and the refugee population on the Cúcuta- Pamplona route during the largest exodus and migration crisis in the Western Hemisphere aggravated by the global pandemic.

During the reporting period, the Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Team successfully delivered the needed food commodities and PPE supplies, portable hand-wash stations, face masks, cleaning, and disinfectant supplies to help prevent the propagation of COVID-19. The team monitored and evaluated the project weekly. The meal distribution registration lists were collected and processed every two weeks by gender and age, as reflected in this report.
59
Thanks to the Rise Against Hunger (RAH) COVID-19 Response Grant, and donations from the Chanhassen Rotary Foundation/Rotary Club Chanhassen and individuals, the Rotary Club of Cúcuta and Rotary e-Club of Houston Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Team, provided 162,272 hot meals and helped alleviate hunger affecting thousands of vulnerable Venezuelan refugees, migrants, walkers “caminantes,” and Colombian returnees. Our distribution of PPE supplies, disinfectant products, and thousands of face masks helped protect and prevent the propagation of COVID-19 among the volunteers and the refugee population on the Cúcuta- Pamplona route during the largest exodus and migration crisis in the Western Hemisphere aggravated by the global pandemic.

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Phase 4 Hope For Venezuelan Refugees COVID-19 Response Report

  1. 1. HOPE FOR VENEZUELAN REFUGEES PROJECT PHASE 4 COVID-19 RESPONSE REPORT Prepared by Cristal Montañéz Baylor, Hope For Venezuelan Refugees International Coordinator & Project Manager International Service Committee Rotary e-Club of Houston
  2. 2. HOPE FOR VENEZUELAN REFUGEES PROJECT PHASE 4 COVID-19 RESPONSE REPORT A. Propose Performance Period Start and End Date Rise Against Hunger Cooperative Agreement August 15, 2020 to February 15, 2021 Actual Project Initiation & Duration September 28, 2020 to March 31, 2021 Actual Meal Utilization Period October 2, 2020 to March 7, 2021 (22 Weeks) B. Executive Summary Project Title Hope for Venezuelan Refugees Project COVID-19 Response Slogan Alleviating hunger – Building Peace Brief Project Description Phase 4 of the Hope For Venezuelan Refugees is an emergency humanitarian project responding to the food insecurity and hunger affecting thousands of Venezuelan refugees, migrants, and walkers “caminantes” through the donation of locally produced commodities to the selected food distribution centers food/shelters cooking and distributing meals to this migrant population in the Cúcuta-Pamplona humanitarian route. Personal protection equipment (PPE), portable handwash stations, face masks, cleaning, and disinfectant supplies were distributed as part of our response to help prevent the propagation of COVID-19. Major Donor Rise Against Hunger (RAH) Other Donors - Chanhassen Rotary Foundation/Rotary Club Chanhassen - Individuals Country Colombia Site/Location Cúcuta, Los Patios, Pamplona, El Alto de Pamplona Target Population Venezuelan refugees, migrants and walkers “caminantes” Total Number of Refugees & Migrants Affected in the Targeted Area According to UNHCR, there are 1,8 million Venezuelan refugees and migrants in Colombia Actual Meal Utilization Period October 2, 2020 to March 7, 2021 (22 weeks) Food Distribution Centers/Shelters Beneficiary Organizations - RHP-2 Punto Hidratación Hermanos Caminantes Venezolanos y Colombianos - RHP-3 Albergue Fundar 1 - RHP-4 Albergue Hogar de Paso Marta Duque - RHP-5 Albergue Douglas - RHP-6 Albergue Vanessa - RHP-7 Centro de Apoyo Mery
  3. 3. 3 - RHLP-1 Fundación Nueva Ilusión - CDC-1 Comunidad Indígena Yukpa / JUCUM Project Objective 1 Objective 1 - To provide access to food to Venezuelan refugees, migrants, and walkers “caminantes” on the Cúcuta-Pamplona humanitarian route during the COVID-19 pandemic crisis. Results Project Objective 1 The project provided access to food in response to the food insecurity and hunger affecting thousands of Venezuelan refugees during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our team procured and distributed locally produced commodities to the selected Food Distribution Centers/Shelters cooking and providing meals to the migrants and walkers “caminantes” on the Cúcuta-Pamplona route. Total of 162,272 meals distributed (A+B): A. 141,679 Meals Distributed to Registered Beneficiaries B. 20,593 Meals Distributed to Non-Registered Beneficiaries (calculated at 20% which includes 3 meals per day for 40 volunteers during 22 weeks) C. 42,070 kg of local food commodities procured and delivered to selected food distribution centers/shelters Project Objective 2 Objective 2 - To prevent the propagation of COVID-19 through the distribution of PPE (Personal Protection Equipment) and supplies to help protect the volunteers and the migrant population on the Cúcuta-Pamplona route. Results Project Objective 2 The project help prevent the propagation of the coronavirus through the distribution of protection products: PPE (Personal Protection Equipment) - Hand-washing stations (stainless-steel portable & pedal operated - Face masks - Bio-security suits - Anti-fluid aprons Cleaning Supplies & Disposable Items - Disposable plates, cups, spoons - Alcohol - Chlorine - Liquid hand soap - Anti-bacterial gel - General use detergent/disinfectant - Trash bags Sponsor Rotary Club Point of Contact Rotary e-Club of Houston District 5890 Cristal Montañéz Baylor, International Project Coordinator & Project Manager International Service Committee cristalmontanezvenezuela@gmail.com
  4. 4. 4 +1 (713) 483-4990 Country Rotary Club Partner Rotary Club Cúcuta District 4271 Marines Celis, President marcelisg@hotmail.com +57 301 618-9801 Luis Emilio Vera Duarte, Treasurer emilioveradua@gmail.com +57 300 571-1762 Project Staff Rotary e-Club of Houston District 5890 Henry Sandoval, Project Country Manager henryalbertosandoval@gmail.com +57 (321) 202-5129 Cindy Catony, Digital Platform Assistance catonicindy@gmail.com +58 414 998-5938 Logistic Partners - Rotary Club Cúcuta District 4271 - Red Humanitaria - Social Media Blog: https://hopeforvenezuelanrefugees.blogspot.com/ Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Hope-For-Venezuelan- Refugees-Project-113163323407295 Instagram Phase 4: @hope_for_venezuelan_refugees
  5. 5. 5 C. Crisis Overview Venezuelan Humanitarian Crisis Background Venezuelans continue to struggle to survive in a country suffering the worst political and economic crisis in history under the Nicolas Maduro regime, a continuation of the Hugo Chávez regime. The shortage of food and medicine, lack of essential services such as electricity, water, propane gas, gasoline, and collapsed hospital systems have forced Venezuelan to abandon their homeland. Most Venezuelans live in extreme poverty and misery. Children, elderly, and the sick are the most affected by the Venezuelan complex humanitarian crisis. Every day, more die from causes related to hunger, malnutrition, and disease. The unemployment rate is 35.5 percent1 and annual inflation rate of 2,667 percent was reported in January of 20212 With an unprecedented monthly minimum wage of approximately 1.20 USD3 per month, Venezuelans would require 144 times the minimum wage to access a basic basket of essential commodities. Children and the elderly along with the sick are the most affected by the Venezuelan complex humanitarian crisis, and every day more die from causes related to hunger, malnutrition, and disease. Venezuelan Exodus This complex crisis has forced 1 in 7 Venezuelans to abandon their homeland for neighboring countries like Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, and the U.S. The exodus of Venezuelans is the largest in the recent history of Latin America and the Caribbean. As of November 2020, more than 5.4 million refugees and migrants from Venezuela are outside their country of origin, with 4.6 million in the region alone making this crisis the biggest forced migration crisis caused by dictatorship and corruption, surpassing the Syrian refugee crisis, which has suffered from war for more than eight years. Colombia hosts the largest number of refugees and migrants, with nearly 1.8 million, and 845,000 Colombian and binational returnees according to the Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan for Refugees and Migrants from Venezuela.4 1 https://www.imf.org/external/datamapper/profile/VEN 2 https://tradingeconomics.com/venezuela/inflation-cpi 3 https://reliefweb.int/report/venezuela-bolivarian-republic/humanitarian-action-children-2021-bolivarian-republic-venezuela 4 https://rmrp.r4v.info
  6. 6. 6 COVID-19 Pandemic Crisis, Migration & Food Insecurity in the Cúcuta-Pamplona Route At the end of January 2020, as the new coronavirus Sars-CoV-2 (COVID-19) began to spread throughout Europe, the Colombian authorities were aware that the disease would eventually arrive in the country and test its health system - a system already burdened by various historical, social and economic-related problems, likely to be exacerbated by the pandemic and to lead to tragedy. The virus was confirmed to have reached Colombia on 6 March 2020. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the Colombian government, led by President Iván Duque and the governors and mayors of the main cities, swiftly designed a strategy to respond to COVID-19 with monitoring and evaluation mechanisms and instruments such as the Unified Command Post (PMU). From 17 March to 1 September, Colombia denied entry to those who were not Colombian citizens, permanent residents, or diplomats, and as of 30 September, a negative PCR test result issued within 96 hours prior to departure was required to enter the country. Land and water borders remained closed until 1 November. At the beginning of the pandemic, most humanitarian activities were suspended on the Cúcuta-Pamplona route due to protocols and guidelines to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. The pandemic also affected the limited aid two of the shelters received through an agreement with the World Food Program, which decided to cancel their programs. The humanitarian route was unattended during this complex humanitarian crisis. The shelters were closed following the protection guidelines and protocols imposed by the local and national government Colombian government to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Nonetheless, it was very challenging for the local and national governments, and international organizations to contain the influx of refugees and provide food for this vulnerable population. As the number of COVID-19 cases increased in Colombia and other neighboring countries, so did the number of displaced Venezuelans who lost their income source and were evicted from their homes. In contrast, others continued to flee from Venezuela to Colombia and other countries, escaping violence, persecution, lack of work, and scarcity of food and essential services in Venezuela, resulting in a bi-directional migration despite the restrictions imposed by the coronavirus pandemic. The pandemic worsened the food insecurity affecting the Venezuelan refugees, migrants, Colombian returnees, and the vulnerable local communities in the region. At that point, the coordinators, and volunteers of some of the food distribution centers/shelters contacted a few organizations and requested donations of food, disposable boxes, and face masks to distribute among the refugees, migrants and walkers “caminantes” walking by the humanitarian route. In April 2020, the Hope For Venezuelan Refugees team initiated a Phase 3 of the project to help respond to the food insecurity and hunger affecting thousands of Venezuelan refugees, migrants, and walker “caminantes” during the emergency crisis caused by the COVID-19 global pandemic. The Rotary Club of Cúcuta, local volunteers, and the project international coordinator Cristal Montañéz, worked together to manage the distribution of meals, PPE, face masks, cleaning, and disinfectant supplies to the food distribution centers and shelters preparing and serving meals to this migrant population. Additionally, bags with groceries and personal hygiene supplies were distributed to vulnerable local families thanks to donations sponsored by the Rotary Club of Chanhassen, Rotary Clubs, and individuals. Phase 3 ended the first week in September 2020.
  7. 7. 7 Migration Flow Increase & Risks Despite the regulations imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, hundreds of Venezuelan walkers “caminantes” cross the Venezuelan-Colombian border every day through illegal and clandestine routes called “trochas.” They take great risks to survive and search for search of jobs, food, and a place to live. They have no place to go and feel hopeless for leaving everything they worked for behind. Who are the Venezuelan walkers "caminantes"? The walkers “caminantes,” as they are known, are women, men, and children traveling on foot to escape from the violence, lack of food, medicine, essential services, poverty, and misery brought by Nicolas Maduro's regime. Despite the closing of the Venezuelan-Colombian border, they continue to flee Venezuela's complex humanitarian crisis. The caminantes walk for hours, days, or weeks under hazardous weather conditions—from extreme heat to the Paramos' bitter cold. Most of them are hungry and very poor in desperate need of assistance as they travel on foot from city to city, and in many instances, from country to country. They walk approximately 556 kilometers from Cúcuta to Bogotá. Others walk for weeks to neighboring countries on a narrow road in life-threatening weather conditions without money or food. An average person walks at a speed of 5 km / hour. One hour by vehicle equals10 hours walking. The walking time is relative and depends on the weight the walkers “caminantes” carry, their physical condition and resistance, the weather, food and shelter availability, type of shoe, whether they walk with children, and senior citizens, etc. A humanitarian transportation program should be a priority to diminish this danger and to help alleviate the exhaustion and despair suffered by refugees, migrants, and walkers “caminantes” during their very long and Diario El Tiempo
  8. 8. 8 challenging walks to their destination. The migrant population has been exposed to high risks and vulnerable situations while in transit. Activating a humanitarian transportation programs will reduce the widespread victimization and exploitation in border regions, diminish recruitment of Venezuelan youth and young adults (age 13–25 years) into paramilitary groups and gangs, prevent armed actors from forcing undocumented migrants into working in the coca fields, and prevent Venezuelan women and children to be forced into sex work and human trafficking. More support is required from UN agencies and local authorities responsible for ensuring the protection and defense of refugees and migrants' fundamental human rights and the host population. These rights must be respected and cannot be violated even during the COVID-19 crisis. Food Distribution Centers/Shelters Volunteers on the Humanitarian Cúcuta-Pamplona Route It is essential to highlight that the work of civil society, and the food distribution center/shelters coordinators and volunteers have been essential to respond to the challenges faced by refugees and migrants in Colombia in the sectors of nutrition and health. Their work has contributed to save lives and dignify the passage of walkers along the humanitarian route. Before COVID-19, they provided shelter, hot meals, and information 24 hours a day and seven days a week. It will be difficult to imagine what would have happened in some regions without the volunteers' response and attention, and the civic society food distribution centers and shelters that have provided hundreds of thousands of meals to refugees and migrants for the last four years.
  9. 9. 9 UN agencies have been mitigating various aspects of the humanitarian crisis in some regions of Colombia and should consider including a broader representation of civic society and volunteer organizations like the food distribution centers/shelters in the humanitaria route to formulate, unify strategies and strengthen alliances to offer a more comprehensive and sustainable support plan for the Venezuelan refugees and migrants. Caminantes on the Cúcuta-Pamplona Humanitarian Route https://youtu.be/UjlBu6AmVAc All the pictures in the video were taken by our volunteers. D. Phase 4 Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Phase 4 Hope For Venezuelan Refugees COVID-19 Response Access to food is a fundamental human right* and is the main priority in the Venezuelan humanitarian crisis. *Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Article 25). The COVID-19 pandemic worsened the food insecurity affecting thousands of Venezuelan refugees, migrants, walkers “caminantes,” and Colombian returnees, and vulnerable local communities. Phase 4 of the Hope For Venezuelan Refugees project was initiated on September 28, 2020, to provide access to food to thousands of hunger Venezuelan refugees, migrants, and walkers “caminantes” through the donation of locally produced commodities to the selected food distribution centers food/shelters cooking and distributing meals to the migrant population in the Cúcuta-Pamplona humanitarian route. PPE (Personal Protection Equipment) and products, including portable hand-wash stations, face masks, cleaning, and disinfectant supplies were distributed as part of our efforts to help prevent the propagation of COVID-19:
  10. 10. 10 - RHP-2 Punto Hidratación Hermanos Caminantes Venezolanos y Colombianos - RHP-3 Albergue Fundar 1 - RHP-4 Albergue Hogar de Paso Marta Duque - RHP-5 Albergue Douglas - RHP-6 Albergue Vanessa - RHP-7 Centro de Apoyo Mery - RHLP-1 Fundación Nueva Ilusión - CDC-1 Comunidad Indígena Yukpa / JUCUM Partnerships and Support Networks The Hope For Venezuelan Refugees team worked with the network of support organizations: Rise Against Hunger main partner and donor. Other donors: Chanhassen Rotary Foundation/Rotary Club Chanhassen and individuals. Rotary e-Club of Houston develop, coordinate, oversee the implementation the project in Colombia, and managed the financial records in the USA. Rotary Club of Cúcuta facilitated the financial administration of the project in Colombia and work in conjunction with the Rotary e-Club of Houston Project International Coordinator. The Rotary Club of Cúcuta, the Rotary e-Club of Houston Project International Coordinator, and the Country Project Manager worked very closely to: - Execute, monitor, and manage all project related activities in alignment with the proposed objectives. - Coordinate the food commodities and supplies procurement, distribution, transportation and delivery in compliance with quarantine protocols and restrictions.
  11. 11. 11 - Work with the coordinators and volunteers of the selected food distribution centers/shelters and oversee the preparation, cooking and distribution of meals to the refugees and migrants following the protocols, guidelines and constraints imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic and quarantine. - Distribute the new meal distribution registration lists and encourage the volunteers to register the meals distributed. - Collect and process the data containing the number of meals distributed by food distribution center, gender and age. - Request evidence and pictures of all activities involving the food and PPE distribution, including sharing pictures in the WhatsApp group daily. - Develop relationships and coordinate efforts with local, international and GIFMM organizations in the region to prevent duplication of efforts and donations. Meal Distribution Registration Lists Leveraging on the lessons learned from Phases 1,2 and 3, we developed a new meal distribution registration list with the objective of standardizing the information collected to help measure the number of meals distributed per family unit, gender and age categories in each food distribution center/shelter. The collection of the registration lists was easier than prior phases of the project despite the challenges imposed by the pandemic. All the centers shared pictures and videos of the meal distribution. The new meal registration list enabled the volunteers to collect the following information: - Date - ID # of the head of family - Name & last name, - No. of boys 1-18 per family - No. of girls 1-18 per family - No. men 19-50 per family - No. women 19-50 per family - No. men +50 per family - No. women +50 per family
  12. 12. 12 The project manager collected the copies of the registration lists every two weeks, processed, and logged in the data into the designated Smartsheet. Below is a sample of the new registration list.
  13. 13. 13 D. Project Objectives Project Objective 1 To provide access to food to Venezuelan refugees, migrants, and walkers “caminantes” on the Cúcuta- Pamplona humanitarian route during the COVID-19 pandemic crisis. Project Objective 1 Results The project provided access to food in response to food insecurity and hunger affecting thousands of Venezuelan refugees during the COVID-19 crisis. Our team procured and distributed locally produced commodities to the selected Food Distribution Centers/Shelters cooking and providing meals to the migrants and walkers “caminantes” on the Cúcuta-Pamplona route. 162,272 Meals were distributed to Venezuelan refugees, migrants and walkers “caminantes” through the selected food distribution centers/shelters: A. 141,679 Meals distributed to registered beneficiaries B. 20,593 Meals distributed to non-registered beneficiaries and volunteers (calculated at 20% which includes 3 meals per day for 40 volunteers during 22 weeks). There are several reasons why some refugees and migrants did not sign the meal distribution registration lists: - Challenges imposed by the pandemic and the fear of propagation of COVID-19
  14. 14. 14 - Lack of dedicated volunteer to register beneficiaries - Lack of funds to hire a dedicated person to the register beneficiaries - People who were afraid to sign - People who could not sign because volunteers very occupied and the registration book was not available. - People who pick up a meal box an continue walking without signing the registration list.
  15. 15. 15 Meal Distribution at Food Distribution Center/Shelter The table and graphic below contain the number of meals distributed to refugees, migrants, and walkers “caminantes” by the selected food distribution centers in the Cúcuta-Pamplona humanitarian route during the period of times indicated. Food Distribution Center/Shelters Initial Date End Date Total Meals Distributed RHP-2 Punto de Hidratación Hermanos Caminantes Venezolanos y Colombianos 10/3/20 3/5/21 29,303 RHP-3 Albergue Fundar 1 10/3/20 3/3/21 68,188 RHP-4 Albergue Hogar de Paso Marta Duque 10/3/20 3/1/21 12,149 RHP-5 Albergue Douglas 10/3/20 3/7/21 7,688 RHP-6 Albergue Vanessa 10/3/20 3/3/21 9,552 RHP-7 Centro de Apoyo Mery 10/3/20 2/28/21 10,164 RHLP-1 Fundación Colombo Venezolana Nueva Ilusión 10/2/20 3/1/21 9,700 CDC-1 JUCUM Carpa Esperanza / Comunidad Yukpa 10/2/20 3/1/21 15,528 Total 10/2/20 3/7/21 162,272
  16. 16. 16 C. During Phase 4, a total of 42,070 kg of the listed food commodities were procured and distributed every two weeks to the selected food distribution centers/shelters for 22 weeks: - The first distribution was made on October 2, 2020 and the last one was on February 17, 2020. - The meal utilization time was from October 2, 2020 to March 7, 2020. No. Product Vendor Unit Quantity / Item Kg 1-Local Food Commodities Items 1.1 Papa (Potatoes) Ebenezer kg 9,190 9,190 1.2 Zanahoria (Carrots) Ebenezer kg 1,419 1,419 1.3 Cebolla Blanca (Onion) Ebenezer kg 1,009 1,009 1.4 Cebolla Verde (Onion) Ebenezer kg 927 927 1.5 Tomate (Tomatoes) Ebenezer kg 469 469 1.5 Pimentones Pintones y Verdes (Peppers) Ebenezer kg 406 406 1.6 Cilantro Ebenezer kg 77 77 1.7 Leche Liquida (Milk) Ebenezer lt 2,350 2,350 1.8 Chocolate de Mesa (Table Chocolate) Ebenezer lb 1,045 1,045 1.9 Café Marca El Aroma (Coffee) Ebenezer 500 gr 40 40 1.10 Aceite (Oil) Ebenezer 900 mml 1,435 1,435 1.11 Pollo Pernil (Chicken) Ebenezer 1kg 5,702 5,702 1.12 Panela (Brown Sugar) Ebenezer 500 gr 1,855 928 1.13 Huevos (Carton 30 Eggs) Ebenezer 1,650 gr 948 1,564 1.14 Pan de Sandwich 16 Rebanadas (Loaf Bread) Ebenezer 560 gr 2,975 1,666 1.15 Ricostilla (Seasoning) Ebenezer 11 gr 5,592 6 1.16 Harina Pan (Corn Flour) Ebenezer kg 1,881 1,881 1.17 Avena marca La Abuela (Oats) Ebenezer kg 523 523 1.18 Yuca (Yucca Root) Ebenezer kg 440 440 1.19 Apio en Ramas (Celery) Ebenezer kg 185 185 1.20 Ajo (Garlic) Ebenezer Kg 112 112 1.21 Mazorca (Corn) Ebenezer kg 6,140 6,140 1.22 Arracacha (Root similar to Yucca) Ebenezer kg 260 260 1.23 Bolsitas Pimienta Molida (Crushed Pepper Bags) Ebenezer 25 gr 438 - 1.24 Sal (Salt) Ebenezer kg 553 536 1.25 Arroz (Rice) Ebenezer kg 3,216 3,216 1.26 Lentejas (Lentils) Ebenezer lb 692 315 1.27 Hojas de Platano para Hallacas (Plantain Leaves) Ebenezer kg 24 24 1.28 Cabuya de Fique para amarrar Hallacas (Fine Rope) Ebenezer roll 20 - 1.29 Garbanzos (Chick Peas) Ebenezer lb 28 13 1.30 Auyama (Pumpkin) Ebenezer lb 10 10 1.31 Chocheco (Green Plantain) Ebenezer lb 34 34 1.32 Leche en Polvo (Power Milk) X 25 kl Bodega Ayala 25 kg 6 150 Total 50,001 42,070
  17. 17. 17
  18. 18. 18 The table and chart below illustrate the percentage of the total number of meals distributed to registered children, women, and men by age range and gender from October 2, 2020 to March 7, 2021. Food Distribution Center/Shelters Boys 1-18 Girls 1-18 Men 19-50 Women 19-50 Men +50 Women +50 No.Meals Distributed/ Registered Beneficiaries 20% Meals Distributed/No n-Registered Beneficiaries & Volunteers Total Meals Distributed RHP-2 3,788 4,961 8,552 6,015 624 479 24,419 4,884 29,303 RHP-3 11,767 13,176 13,783 15,451 3,091 1,803 59,071 9,117 68,188 RHP-4 2,323 2,541 2,267 2,159 404 430 10,124 2,025 12,149 RHP-5 1,150 1,027 2,803 1,274 88 65 6,407 1,281 7,688 RHP-6 806 859 2,981 2,842 236 236 7,960 1,592 9,552 RHP-7 1,510 1,754 2,378 2,049 485 294 8,470 1,694 10,164 RHLP-1 1,507 1,436 2,948 2,758 482 569 9,700 - 9,700 CDC-1 4,752 4,824 2,580 2,940 276 156 15,528 - 15,528 Total 27,603 30,578 38,292 35,488 5,686 4,032 141,679 20,593 162,272
  19. 19. 19 Project Objective 2 To prevent the propagation of COVID-19 through the distribution of PPE (Personal Protection Equipment) and supplies to help protect the volunteers and the migrant population on the Cúcuta-Pamplona route. Project Objective 2 Results The project helped prevent the propagation of COVID-19 by protecting the volunteers and the migrant population through the distribution of protection products and supplies to the selected Food Distribution Centers/Shelters on the Cúcuta-Pamplona route. A COVID-19 prevention banner to promote proper hand- washing procedures and social distance was displaced at each center. PPE (Personal Protection Equipment) distributed - Hand-washing stations (stainless-steel portable & pedal operated) - Face masks - Bio-security suits - Anti-fluid aprons
  20. 20. 20 Cleaning Supplies & Disposable Items - Disposable plates, cups, spoons - Alcohol - Chlorine - Liquid hand soap - Anti-bacterial gel - General use detergent/disinfectant - Trash bags
  21. 21. 21 Product Vendor Units/ Package Total No. Packages Kg / Lt 2-Cleaning Supplies & Disposable Products Disposable Plates Ebenezer 200 2,416 - Disposable Biodegradable Food Boxes Ebenezer 200 52 - Disposable Biodegradable Boxes Ebenezer 200 3,706 - Soup Bowls with Lid Ebenezer 200 520 - Plastic Spoons Ebenezer 100 805 - Disposables Cups Ebenezer 50 812 - Trash Bags Ebenezer 10 units 520 - Paper Towels Vittaly Box 29 - Chlorine Ebenezer kg - 683 Detergent Ebenezer kg - 286 Liquid Hand Soap Vittaly lt - 425 Alcohol 70% Vittaly lt - 466 Anti-bacterial Gel Vittaly lt - 154 8,860 2,014
  22. 22. 22 The supplies below were distributed to the following food distribution centers and organizations: Thanks to the Rise Against Hunger (RAH) COVID-19 Response Grant, Venezuelan refugees, migrants, and walkers “caminantes” had access to clean water and soap to wash their hands, receive a face mask, and a hot nutritious meal after their challenging and very long walk to other cities or countries. Five hand-washing stations were donated to critical Food Distribution Centers/Shelters. Each stainless-steel hand-washing station has two pedals, one for the water and another for the hand soap dispenser and the front of the station has hand-washing instructions according to the guideline and protocols to help prevent the propagation of COVID-19.
  23. 23. 23
  24. 24. 24 E. Meal Distribution Summary per Food Distribution Center/Shelters RHP-2 Punto de Hidratación Hermanos Caminantes Venezolanos y Colombianos Summary RHP-2 Punto de Hidratación Hermanos Caminantes Venezolanos y Colombianos Summary Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Food Commodities & COVID-19 Prevention Supplies Distribution Duration: 10/3/2020 al 03/05/2021 Number of Days 147 Meal Distribution Frequency: Breakfast, lunch & dinner - 7 days/week Meal Distributed to Registered Beneficiaries: 24,419 Boys 1-18 3,788 Girls 1-18 4,961 Men 19-50 8,552 Women 19-50 6,015 Men 50+ 624 Women 50+ 479 Meal Distributed to Non-Registered Beneficiaries Calculated at 20% Including Volunteers 4,824 Total Meals Distributed: 29,303 COVID-19 Response/Protection Supplies Distributed: - Hope For Venezuelan Refugees/Rise Against Hunger donated an stainless-steel portable pedal operated hand-wash station which is used by the refugees upon arrival at this food distribution center to prevent propagation of COVID-19. - 2,500 Washable face masks - Alcohol, anti-bacterial gel, liquid hand soap, disinfectant supplies & disposable food containers, spoons & cups - 5 Anti-fluid aprons - 3 Meal Distribution Registration Books - 1 COVID-19 prevention campaign banner Partner Organization: Punto de Hidratación Hermanos Caminantes Venezolanos y Colombianos Coordinator: Ronald Vergara Number of Volunteers 5 Location: KDX 47-5 Frente a la Entrada Finca Villa Marina de la UNIPAMPLONA,Vereda Matajira, Pamplonita, Norte de Santander Donors: Rice Against Hunger, Hope For Venezuelan Refugees, Banco Diocesano de Alimentos de Cúcuta, Individuals, Fundación Aladino, On the Ground International. Most of the donors
  25. 25. 25 provide specific items for a limited short term. Services: Serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner daily. Ronald and his family run this food distribution center. Each family member plays a role in the process of preparing food and caring for the refugees and migrants who daily stop at this this distribution center on their way to Pamplona, other cities or neighboring country. Ronald is not working and finds himself in the difficult position of asking third parties for support to pay for utilities such as gas propane, water, electricity, and leasing cost. Carpa Esperanza volunteers help three days per week. The volunteers wash the feet of the caminantes and treat the blisters. Type of Migrant Population Served: Venezuelan migrants, refugees, walkers “caminantes,” Colombian returnees Links to Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmRaB3by Links to Video: https://youtu.be/NY73op5a4Cs
  26. 26. 26 Meal Distribution Summary RHP-2 Punto de Hidratación Hermanos Caminantes Venezolanos y Colombianos The table below summarizes the meal distributed to refugees, migrants, and walkers “caminantes” according to the data collected and documented on the registration lists during the implementation of the project. This graphic based on the number of meals distributed during the period of times indicated reflects the migration flow passing through this food distribution center.
  27. 27. 27 The chart illustrates the percentage of children, women, and men by age range and gender based on the following age ranges: boys 1-18, girls1-18, men 19-50, women 19-50, men 50+ and women 50+. Men 19-50 years old represent 35% of the total number of refugees, migrants and caminantes according to the data collected on the registration lists in this food distribution center from 10/3/20 to 3/5/21.
  28. 28. 28 RHP-3 Albergue Fundar 1 Summary RHP-3 Albergue Fundar 1 Summary Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Food Commodities & COVID-19 Prevention Supplies Distribution Duration: 10/3/2020 - 3/3/2021 Number of Days: 120 Meal Distribution Frequency: Breakfast, lunch & dinner - 7 days/week Meal Distributed to Registered Beneficiaries: 59,071 Boys 1-18 11,767 Girls 1-18 13,176 Men 19-50 13,783 Women 19-50 15,451 Men 50+ 3,091 Women 50+ 1,803 Meal Distributed to Non-Registered Beneficiaries Calculated at 20% Including Volunteers: 9,117 Total Meals Distributed: 68,188 COVID-19 Response/Protection Supplies Distributed: - Hope For Venezuelan Refugees/Rise Against Hunger donated an stainless-steel portable pedal operated hand-wash station which is used by the refugees upon arrival at this food distribution center to prevent propagation of COVID-19. - 2,700 Washable face masks - Alcohol, anti-bacterial gel, liquid hand soap, disinfectant supplies & disposable food containers, spoons & cups - 8 Anti-fluid aprons - 3 Meal Distribution Registration Books - 1 COVID-19 prevention campaign banner Partner Organization: Fundación Antonio Rojas. Coordinator: Julián Tiria Galviz Number of Volunteers: 8 Location: 500 mts de la entrada Bochalema al lado de la trituradora La Antigua Gallera Donors: Rice Against Hunger, Hope For Venezuelan Refugees, Solodarités International, Red Cruz, CARE, OIM, Premiere Urgence International, Opción Legal Services Offered: Serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner daily. Solidarités International remodeled the kitchen and resting areas, donates staples foods and provides an economic incentive to the volunteers and shelter coordinator. Additionally, Legal Option in association with IOM provide child protection workshops in child- friendly spaces. The Red Cross offers basic health care interventions, and personal hygiene kit distribution. Type of Migrant Population Served: Venezuelan migrants, refugees, walkers “caminantes,”
  29. 29. 29 Colombian returnees. Links to Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmRaCB7d Links to Video: https://youtu.be/x5LSqSJnIR4
  30. 30. 30 Meal Distribution Summary RHP-3 Albergue Fundar 1 The table below summarizes the meal distributed to refugees, migrants, and walkers “caminantes” according to the data collected and documented on the registration forms during the implementation of the project. This graphic based on the number of meals distributed during the period of times indicated reflects the migration flow passing through this food distribution center. During 1/3/21 to 2/1/21 there was no food delivery, and no data was collected.
  31. 31. 31 The chart illustrates the percentage of children, women, and men by age range and gender based on the following age ranges: boys 1-18, girls1-18, men 19-50, women 19-50, men 50+ and women 50+. Women 19-50 years old represent 26% of the total number of refugees, migrants and caminantes according to the data collected on the registration lists in this food distribution center from 10/3/20 to 3/3/21.
  32. 32. 32 RHP-4 Albergue Hogar De Paso Marta Duque Summary RHP-4 Albergue Hogar de Paso Marta Duque Summary Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Food Commodities & COVID-19 Prevention Supplies Distribution Duration: 10/3/2020 - 3/1/2021 Number of Days: 118 Meal Distribution Frequency: Breakfast, lunch & dinner - 7 days/week Meal Distributed to Registered Beneficiaries: 10,124 Boys 1-18 2,323 Girls 1-18 2,541 Men 19-50 2,267 Women 19-50 2,159 Men 50+ 404 Women 50+ 430 Meal Distributed to Non-Registered Beneficiaries Calculated at 20% Including Volunteers: 2,025 Total Meals Distributed: 12,149 COVID-19 Response/Protection Supplies Distributed: - 1,800 Washable face masks - Alcohol, anti-bacterial gel, liquid hand soap, disinfectant supplies & disposable food containers, spoons & cups - 7 Anti-fluid aprons - 2 Meal Distribution Registration Books - 1 COVID-19 prevention campaign banner Partner Organization: Albergue Hogar de Paso Marta Duque Coordinator: Marta Duque Number of Volunteers 7 Location: Carrera 9 # 1 – 02 Barrio El Camellón, Pamplona Donors: Rise Against Hunger, Hope for Venezuelan Refugees, On the Ground International, individuals, Solidarités International, Care, state authorities in association with IOM. Most of the donors provide specific items for a limited short term. Services: Serves breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Marta Duque and a group of Venezuelan volunteers cook, serve food and organize refugees and migrants who spend the night. Marta provides volunteers with food and a place to sleep at home. This shelter is key location for state organizations and NGOs to keep a record of the flow of refugees entering Pamplona. Therefore, government in associate with IOM perform
  33. 33. 33 screenings and digital, distribution of biosecurity kit to migrants and epidemiological checks are carried out registrations as a measure of prevention of COVID-19. At the end of February 2021, Solidarités International began the distribution of a set amount of packed breakfasts and lunches every other day. Type of Migrant Population Served: Venezuelan migrants, refugees, walkers “caminantes,” Colombian returnees, very vulnerable local Venezuelans Links to Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmRaCTnV Links to Video: https://youtu.be/Wg8vZGky9So
  34. 34. 34 Meal Distribution Summary RHP-4 Albergue Hogar de Paso Marta Duque The table below summarizes the meal distributed to refugees, migrants, and walkers “caminantes” according to the data collected and documented on the registration forms during the implementation of the project. This graphic based on the number of meals distributed during the period of times indicated reflects the migration flow passing through this food distribution center. During 12/23/20 to 1/31/21 there was no food delivery, and no data was collected. Food Dist Center/ Shelters Start Date End Date No. Days Boys 1-18 Girls 1-18 Men 19-50 Women 19-50 Men +50 Women +50 No.Meals Distributed & Registered 20% Meals Distributed /Non- Registered & Volunteers Total Meals Distributed RHP-4 10/03/20 10/12/20 10d 317 299 206 227 50 60 1159 232 1391 RHP-4 10/17/20 10/28/20 12d 398 347 319 323 88 115 1590 318 1908 RHP-4 10/29/20 11/18/20 21d 378 426 331 339 77 84 1635 327 1962 RHP-4 11/18/20 11/25/20 8d 186 220 197 197 26 26 852 170 1022 RHP-4 12/03/20 12/13/20 11d 406 542 303 300 87 72 1710 342 2052 RHP-4 12/19/20 12/22/20 4d 198 184 103 150 17 25 677 135 812 RHP-4 - - - - - - - - - RHP-4 02/01/21 02/16/21 16d 140 184 406 292 26 31 1079 216 1295 RHP-4 02/16/21 03/01/21 14d 300 339 402 331 33 17 1422 284 1706 Total 10/3/20 3/1/21 96 2,323 2,541 2,267 2,159 404 430 10,124 2,025 12,149 1391 1908 1962 1022 2052 812 - 1294.8 1706 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 10/03/20 10/17/20 10/29/20 11/18/20 12/03/20 12/19/20 02/01/21 02/16/21 10/12/20 10/28/20 11/18/20 11/25/20 12/13/20 12/22/20 02/16/21 03/01/21 No. Meals Distributed RHP-4 Albergue Hogar de Paso Marta Duque 10/3/20 - 3/1/21
  35. 35. 35 The chart illustrates the percentage of children, women, and men by age range and gender based on the following age ranges: boys 1-18, girls1-18, men 19- 50, women 19-50, men 50+ and women 50+. Girls 1-18 years old represent 25% of the total number of refugees, migrants and caminantes according to the data collected on the registration lists on this food distribution center from 10/3/20 to 3/1/21.
  36. 36. 36 RHP-5 Albergue Douglas Summary RHP-5 Albergue Douglas Summary Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Food Commodities & COVID-19 Prevention Supplies Distribution Duration: 10/3/2020 - 3/7/2021 Number of Days: 129 Meal Distribution Frequency: Breakfast, lunch & dinner - 7 days/week Meal Distributed to Registered Beneficiaries: 6,407 Boys 1-18 1,150 Girls 1-18 1,027 Men 19-50 2,803 Women 19-50 1,274 Men 50+ 88 Women 50+ 65 Meal Distributed to Non-Registered Beneficiaries Calculated at 20% Including Volunteers: 1,281 Total Meals Distributed: 7,688 COVID-19 Response/Protection Supplies Distributed: - Hope For Venezuelan Refugees/Rise Against Hunger donated an stainless-steel portable pedal operated hand-wash station which is used by the refugees upon arrival at this food distribution center to prevent propagation of COVID-19. - 1,700 Washable face masks - Alcohol, anti-bacterial gel, liquid hand soap, disinfectant supplies & disposable food containers, spoons & cups - 6 Anti-fluid aprons - 3 Meal Distribution Registration Books - 1 COVID-19 prevention campaign banner Partner Organization: Albergue Douglas Coordinator: Douglas Cabeza Number of Volunteers 6 Location: Carrera 9 # 1- 00 Barrio El Camellón, Pamplona Donors: Rice Against Hunger, Hope For Venezuelan Refugees, On the Ground International, individuals, Solidarités International, Care Services: Serves breakfast, lunch and dinner during the project execution period daily. Douglas his wife and a group of Venezuelan volunteers cook, serve food and coordinates the use of bathroom/shower services for women and children. Sometimes, CARE donated hygiene and biosafety kits.
  37. 37. 37 At the end of February 2021, Solidarités International began the distribution of a set amount of packed breakfasts and lunches every other day. Type of Migrant Population Served: Venezuelan migrants, refugees, walkers “caminantes” in-transit, irregular, Colombian returnees. Links to Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmRaYsEY Links to Video: https://youtu.be/RsoYwAD7Nwk
  38. 38. 38 Meal Distribution Summary RHP-5 Douglas The table below summarizes the meal distributed to refugees, migrants, and walkers “caminantes” according to the data collected and documented on the registration lists during the implementation of the project. This graphic based on the number of meals distributed during the period of times indicated reflects the migration flow passing through this food distribution center. During 1/5/21 to 1/31/21 there was no food delivery, and no data was collected.
  39. 39. 39 The chart illustrates the percentage of children, women, and men by age range and gender based on the following age ranges: boys 1-18, girls1-18, men 19-50, women 19-50, men 50+ and women 50+. Men 19-50 years old represent 44% of the total number of refugees, migrants and caminantes according to the data collected on the registration lists in this food distribution center from 10/3/20 to 3/7/21.
  40. 40. 40 RHP-6 Albergue Vanessa Summary RHP-5 Albergue Vanessa Summary Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Food Commodities & COVID-19 Prevention Supplies Distribution Duration: 10/3/2020 - 3/3/2021 Number of Days: 136 Meal Distribution Frequency: Breakfast, lunch & dinner - 7 days/week Meal Distributed to Registered Beneficiaries: 7,960 Boys 1-18 806 Girls 1-18 859 Men 19-50 2,981 Women 19-50 2,842 Men 50+ 236 Women 50+ 236 Meal Distributed to Non-Registered Beneficiaries Calculated at 20% Including Volunteers: 1,592 Total Meals Distributed: 9,552 COVID-19 Response/Protection Supplies Distributed: - 1,600 Washable face masks - Alcohol, anti-bacterial gel, liquid hand soap, disinfectant supplies & disposable food containers, spoons & cups - 9 Anti-fluid aprons - 3 Meal Distribution Registration Books - 1 COVID-19 prevention campaign banner Partner Organization: Albergue Vanessa Coordinator: Vanessa Pelaez Number of Volunteers 9 Location: Carrera 3 #5-39 Barrio Las Américas, Pamplona Donors: Rise Against Hunger, Hope for Venezuelan Refugees, On the Ground International, individuals, Solidarités International. Most of the donors provide specific items for a limited short term. Services: Serves breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Vanessa and a group of Venezuelan volunteers cook, serve food, organize refugees and migrants who spend the night, and distributes baby kits, hygiene kits, biosecurity kits donated by individuals and local NGO’s. At the end of February 2021, Solidarités International began the distribution of a set amount of packed breakfasts and lunches. Type of Migrant Population Served: Venezuelan migrants, refugees, walkers “caminantes,” in-transit, irregular, Colombian returnees. Links to Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmRaBhN4
  41. 41. 41 Links to Video: https://youtu.be/eKPKs50Y03w
  42. 42. 42 Meal Distribution Summary RHP-6 Albergue Vanessa The table below summarizes the meal distributed to refugees, migrants, and walkers “caminantes” according to the data collected and documented on the registration lists during the implementation of the project. This graphic based on the number of meals distributed during the period of times indicated reflects the migration flow passing through this food distribution center.
  43. 43. 43 The chart illustrates the percentage of children, women, and men by age range and gender based on the following age ranges: boys 1-18, girls1-18, men 19-50, women 19-50, men 50+ and women 50+. Men 19-50 years old represent 37% of the total number of refugees, migrants and caminantes according to the data collected on the registration lists in this food distribution center from 10/3/20 to 3/7/21.
  44. 44. 44 RHP-7 Centro De Apoyo Mery Summary RHP-7 Centro de Apoyo Mery Summary Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Food Commodities & COVID-19 Prevention Supplies Distribution Duration: 10/3/2020 - 2/28/2021 Number of Days: 133 Meal Distribution Frequency: Breakfast, lunch & dinner - 7 days/week Meal Distributed to Registered Beneficiaries: 8,470 Boys 1-18 1,510 Girls 1-18 1,754 Men 19-50 2,378 Women 19-50 2,049 Men 50+ 485 Women 50+ 294 Meal Distributed to Non-Registered Beneficiaries Calculated at 20% Including Volunteers: 1,694 Total Meals Distributed: 10,164 COVID-19 Response/Protection Supplies Distributed: - Hope For Venezuelan Refugees/Rise Against Hunger donated an stainless-steel portable pedal operated hand-wash station which is used by the refugees upon arrival at this food distribution center to prevent propagation of COVID-19. - 1,150 Washable face masks - Alcohol, anti-bacterial gel, liquid hand soap, disinfectant supplies & disposable food containers, spoons & cups - 3 Anti-fluid aprons - 2 Meal Distribution Registration Books - 1 COVID-19 prevention campaign banner Partner Organization: Centro de Apoyo Mery Coordinator: Rosmery Mendoza Number of Volunteers 3 Location: Vereda Alto Grande Las Casetas, Km 110 Zona Rural, Pamplona Donors: Rice Against Hunger, Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Services: Serves breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Rosmery and her family cook and serve food for the refugees and migrants passing through this critical cold mountainous region. Most migrants carry no money and are exhausted and very hungry after hours of walking.
  45. 45. 45 At the end of February 2021, Solidarités International began the distribution of packed lunches. Type of Migrant Population Served: Venezuelan migrants, refugees, walkers “caminantes,” in-transit, irregular, Colombian returnees. Links to Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmRaD3VH Links to Video: https://youtu.be/l0TZxHCeXFQ
  46. 46. 46 Meal Distribution Summary RHP-7 Centro de Apoyo Mery The table below summarizes the meal distributed to refugees, migrants, and walkers “caminantes” according to the data collected and documented on the registration lists during the implementation of the project. This graphic based on the number of meals distributed during the period of times indicated reflects the migration flow passing through this food distribution center.
  47. 47. 47 The chart illustrates the percentage of children, women, and men by age range and gender based on the following age ranges: boys 1-18, girls1-18, men 19-50, women 19-50, men 50+ and women 50+. Men 19-50 years old represent 28% of the total number of refugees, migrants and caminantes according to the data collected on the registration lists in this food distribution center from 10/3/20 to 3/7/21.
  48. 48. 48 RHLP-1 Fundación Colombo Venezolana Nueva Ilusión Summary RHLP-1 Fundación Nueva Ilusión Summary Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Food Commodities & COVID-19 Prevention Supplies Distribution Duration: 10/2/2020 – 3/1/2021 Number of Days: 129 Meal Distribution Frequency: Once a day – 7 days/week Meal Distributed to Registered Beneficiaries: 9,700 Boys 1-18 1,507 Girls 1-18 1,436 Men 19-50 2,948 Women 19-50 2,758 Men 50+ 482 Women 50+ 569 Meal Distributed to Non-Registered Beneficiaries Calculated at 20% Including Volunteers: 0 Total Meals Disributed: 9,700 COVID-19 Response/Protection Supplies Distributed: - Hope For Venezuelan Refugees/Rise Against Hunger donated an stainless-steel portable pedal operated hand-wash station which is used by the refugees upon arrival at this food distribution center to prevent propagation of COVID- 19. - 500 Washable face masks - 1 Portable pedal operated hand-wash station - Alcohol, anti-bacterial gel, liquid hand soap, disinfectant, disposable food containers, spoons & cups - 1 Meal Registration Books - 1 COVID-19 prevention campaign banner Partner Organization: Fundación Colombo Venezolana Nueva Ilusión Coordinator: Patricia Salguero & Vanessa Apitz Number of Volunteers: 5 Location: Av 10 #22-28, Los Patios & Los Vados Donors: WCK (World Central Kitchen), Rise Against Hunger, Hope For Venezuelan Refugees, Fundación Aladino Services: Distributed a milk drink with bread donated by Hope For Venezuelan Refugees to walkers “caminantes” following the protocols allowed by the restriction of the pandemic. WCK (World Central Kitchen) is their main donor
  49. 49. 49 and provides food products to serve neighboring communities, Venezuelan refugees and local vulnerable families. Type of Migrant Populatio n Served: Venezuelan migrants, refugees, walkers “caminantes,” in-transit, irregular, Colombian returnees, local vulnerable & displaced by violence Links to Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmRaXL6B Links to Video: https://youtu.be/Z174o6ftlqE
  50. 50. 50 Meal Distribution Summary RHLP-1 Fundación Nueva ilusión The table below summarizes the meal distributed to refugees, migrants, and walkers “caminantes” according to the data collected and documented on the registration lists during the implementation of the project. This graphic based on the number of meals distributed during the period of times indicated reflects the migration flow passing through this food distribution center. During 1/1/21 to 1/29/21 there was no food delivery, and no data was collected.
  51. 51. 51 The chart illustrates the percentage of children, women, and men by age range and gender based on the following age ranges: boys 1-18, girls1-18, men 19-50, women 19-50, men 50+ and women 50+. Men 19-50 years old represent 30% of the total number of refugees, migrants and caminantes according to the data collected on the registration lists in this food distribution center from 10/2/20 to 3/1/21.
  52. 52. 52 CDC-1 Indigenous Yukpa Community Summary RHLP-1 Indigenous Yukpa Community Summary Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Food Commodities & COVID-19 Prevention Supplies Distribution Duration: 10/2/2020 - 3/1/2021 Number of Days: 128 Meal Distribution Frequency: Lunch - 3 days/week Meal Distributed to Registered Beneficiaries: 15,528 Boys 1-18 4,752 Girls 1-18 4,824 Men 19-50 2,580 Women 19-50 2,940 Men 50+ 276 Women 50+ 156 Meal Distributed to Non-Registered Beneficiaries Calculated at 20% Including Volunteers: 0 Total Meals Distributed: 15,528 COVID-19 Response/Protection Supplies Distributed: Alcohol, anti-bacterial gel, liquid hand soap 7 Anti-fluid apron Partner Organization: JUCUM Carpa Esperanza Coordinator: Carmén Rangel Number of Volunteers 7 Location: Lote abandonado (era utilizado como el basurero) del Barrio Escobal Comuna 4, Cúcuta Donors: J UCUM Carpa Esperanza, Rice Against Hunger, Hope For Venezuelan Refugees, individuals Services: JUCUM Carpa Esperanza volunteers work with leaders and community members three (3) days a week and cook together for the two (2) tribes in the Yukpa reservation located at the border between the municipality of Pedro María Ureña Estado Táchira (Venezuela) and The Escobal community in Cúcuta (Colombia). Volunteers carry out their pastoral and ministerial work by directing prayers and planned activities for children, women and men. Type of Migrant Population: Venezuelan indigenous migrants and pendular community Links to Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmRaApJW Links to Video: https://youtu.be/lSvcEDb7Tdw
  53. 53. 53 Meal Distribution Summary CDC-1 Yukpa Community The table below summarizes the meal distributed to refugees, migrants, and walkers “caminantes” according to the data collected and documented on the registration lists during the implementation of the project. This graphic based on the number of meals distributed during the period of times indicated. During 1/1/21 to 1/29/21 there was no food delivery, and no data was collected.
  54. 54. 54 The chart illustrates the percentage of children, women, and men by age range and gender based on the following age ranges: boys 1-18, girls1-18, men 19-50, women 19-50, men 50+ and women 50+. Girls 1-18 years old represent 31% of the total number of refugees, migrants and caminantes according to the data collected on the registration lists in this food distribution center from 10/3/20 to 3/7/21.
  55. 55. 55
  56. 56. 56 F. Sharing Hope Sharing a Meal with Families Affected by the Tonchala Creek Overflow in Cúcuta In November 2020, heavy rains overflowed the banks of the Tonchala Creek, destroying the communities 23 de Enero, Tamarindo, La Isla, El Rodeo, and Conjunto Los Arayanes located in commune 8 in Atalaya, in Cúcuta. The inhabitants of this region lost everything as a consequence of this natural cause tragedy. The Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Team, in partnership with Carpa Esperanza and JUCUM visited the 23 de Enero community and distributed bowls of hot soup to the affected families. Rotary Club of Cúcuta, Rotary Club of Chanhassen, and Rotary e-Club of Houston are alleviating hunger and building peace in vulnerable communities.
  57. 57. 57 Bringing Smiles to the Faces of Refugee Children in Pamplona The Hope For Venezuelan Refugees team is deeply grateful to the leadership of Super Mercados Ebenezer for the generous donation of 500 Ebenezer Cajitas Felices (Ebenezer Happy Boxes) filled with delicious snacks for the Venezuelan refugee children, migrants, and walkers "caminantes" in-transit through the city of Pamplona.
  58. 58. 58 Volunteers at Albergue Hogar de Paso Marta Duque, and Albergue Vanessa distributed the Ebenezer Cajitas Felices to the children as they arrive in Pamplona hungry and tired after walking for many hours. Thanks to an anonymous donor, the volunteers at the food distribution centers/shelters distributed thousands of high energy cookies to the Venezuelan refugee children giving them hope and happiness.
  59. 59. 59 G.Challenges & Conclusion Challenges Our team leveraged the lessons learned during Phase 3, and efficiently coordinated the procurement, transportation, and distribution of food commodities and supplies under the challenges and great difficulties imposed by the region's COVID-19 pandemic restrictions and protocols. Keeping social distancing among the migrant population in transit was very challenging and almost an impossible task. The main challenge was the interruption of the programed food distribution caused by delays in receiving the funds in Colombia due to the Rotary e-Club of Houston's financial regulations and guidelines. This situation forced the operating team in Colombia to find alternative solutions to prevent a shortage of food and interruption of the original chronogram of procurement and distribution of food commodities, cleaning, PPE, and disinfectant supplies while waiting for the funds to arrive. Conclusion During the reporting period, the Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Team successfully delivered the needed food commodities and PPE supplies, portable hand-wash stations, face masks, cleaning, and disinfectant supplies to help prevent the propagation of COVID-19. The team monitored and evaluated the project weekly. The meal distribution registration lists were collected and processed every two weeks by gender and age, as reflected in this report.
  60. 60. 60 Thanks to the Rise Against Hunger (RAH) COVID-19 Response Grant, and donations from the Chanhassen Rotary Foundation/Rotary Club Chanhassen and individuals, the Rotary Club of Cúcuta and Rotary e-Club of Houston Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Team, provided 162,272 hot meals and helped alleviate hunger affecting thousands of vulnerable Venezuelan refugees, migrants, walkers “caminantes,” and Colombian returnees. Our distribution of PPE supplies, disinfectant products, and thousands of face masks helped protect and prevent the propagation of COVID-19 among the volunteers and the refugee population on the Cúcuta- Pamplona route during the largest exodus and migration crisis in the Western Hemisphere aggravated by the global pandemic. Annexes - Annex I-Phase 4 Food-PPE-Supplies Purchase Orders & Paid Invoices Summary - Annex II-Phase 4 Meal Distribution Registration/Beneficiaries - Annex III-RAH RLP Budget Projected vs Actual Consolidated - Annex IV-Phase 4 Volunteers Hours - Annex V Human Histories We are people in action serving to change lives. For more information contact: Cristal Montañéz Baylor Rotary e-Club de Houston District 5890 International Service Committee Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Project International Coordinador & Project Manager cristalmontanezvenezuela@gmail.com Marines Celis Rotary Club of Cúcuta District 4271 President Hope For Venezuelan Refugees Project Facilitator marcelisg@hotmail.com

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