Red Cross Red Crescent Response to Economic Crisis Europe Zone Office, Budapest Survey of national society response to the...
Overview <ul><li>Presentation to cover: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Brief overview of how the financial and economic crises were...
Economic Crisis: short recap <ul><li>Origin in financial imbalances around 2006/2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Crisis point in Sep...
Let’s remind ourselves who we are talking about <ul><li>A brief video </li></ul>
National Society Perceptions: <ul><li>Late 2008, scattered expressions of concern, based on reports from branches </li></u...
Economic Crisis: seen from IFRC <ul><ul><li>Difficult  to perceive humanitarian consequences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>La...
Getting information from national socie ties <ul><li>Early recognition a classical “questionnaire” approach would be to sl...
Broad Outcomes of the survey <ul><li>Great majority of European National Societies experience increasing demand for servic...
Vulnerable <ul><ul><li>In EU countries, National Societies identify children and young people as particularly vulnerable <...
Sources of vulnerability <ul><li>Unemployment </li></ul><ul><li>Loss of remittances </li></ul><ul><li>Underinvestment in s...
Types of national society response <ul><li>Reliance on continuation and expansion of existing programme activities: food, ...
National society responses: some specific examples <ul><ul><li>Finnish Red Cross: expanding advisory and practical support...
Did we learn anything from this? <ul><ul><li>If noting else, that we need to think more about how we support national soci...
Future directions? <ul><ul><li>With S2020 there is an updated strategic framework better able to accommodate new ideas on ...
 
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2a Conferència Tècnica sobre els programes de crisi de Creu Roja. Resposta de la FICR a la crisi econòmica (Tore Svenning)

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2a Conferència Tècnica sobre els programes de crisi de Creu Roja. Resposta de la FICR a la crisi econòmica (Tore Svenning)

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2a Conferència Tècnica sobre els programes de crisi de Creu Roja. Resposta de la FICR a la crisi econòmica (Tore Svenning)

  1. 1. Red Cross Red Crescent Response to Economic Crisis Europe Zone Office, Budapest Survey of national society response to the humanitarian consequences of the crisis
  2. 2. Overview <ul><li>Presentation to cover: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Brief overview of how the financial and economic crises were perceived to unfold </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The wish to, and constraints against, providing support from the international level: deciding to gather information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The consequences of the crisis as seen by national societies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>National Society responses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Some thoughts on future approaches </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Economic Crisis: short recap <ul><li>Origin in financial imbalances around 2006/2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Crisis point in September 2008: near collapse of world financial system, crisis spilled over into real economy starting late 2008, intensifying in 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Especially rapid transmission of shock in Europe due to sophisticated and integrated economic systems </li></ul><ul><li>Rapid and concerted international response to save financial system and stabilise macro-economic situation </li></ul><ul><li>Much less attention and resources allocated to mitigate social consequences </li></ul><ul><li>Today, it continues: Greece, Ireland, Portugal </li></ul>
  4. 4. Let’s remind ourselves who we are talking about <ul><li>A brief video </li></ul>
  5. 5. National Society Perceptions: <ul><li>Late 2008, scattered expressions of concern, based on reports from branches </li></ul><ul><li>January 2009, more clearly stated worries from more National Societies across Europe </li></ul><ul><li>Growing unease, and signs of pressure on many National Societies first half 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Growing demand for assistance and services; growing pressure on funding and support </li></ul><ul><li>National Societies – not all – seeking guidance and support from International Federation </li></ul><ul><li>2010 and 2011: continuing social consequences and expanded needs, compounded by rising food prices </li></ul>
  6. 6. Economic Crisis: seen from IFRC <ul><ul><li>Difficult to perceive humanitarian consequences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lack of systematic information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lack of analytical tools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lack of experience at international level </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lack of adequate response tools </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Getting information from national socie ties <ul><li>Early recognition a classical “questionnaire” approach would be to slow and not give the quality of evidence sought </li></ul><ul><li>Questions as basis for structured telephone conversations </li></ul><ul><li>Focus not on statistical data but on judgements and perceptions </li></ul><ul><li>Nearly 100% coverage across the Zone </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Repeated last several months, and will issue an update shortly. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Will add more quantitative data from secondary sources </li></ul></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Broad Outcomes of the survey <ul><li>Great majority of European National Societies experience increasing demand for services, combined with decline in resources </li></ul><ul><li>Widening vulnerability: new groups approaching RC </li></ul><ul><li>Threat to social cohesion in many countries </li></ul><ul><li>Hard-won development gains throughout Europe and Central Asia at risk </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Important also to keep in mind that not all countries were affected </li></ul></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Vulnerable <ul><ul><li>In EU countries, National Societies identify children and young people as particularly vulnerable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Returning migrants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Refugees and people in refugee-like conditions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Middle class </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Across region, single parent households, and large families </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Beneficiaries of existing programmes – if funding dries up – domestically and internationally </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Sources of vulnerability <ul><li>Unemployment </li></ul><ul><li>Loss of remittances </li></ul><ul><li>Underinvestment in social sector, compared with efforts to sort out the financial mess </li></ul><ul><li>Financial insecurity itself as a driver of vulnerability to mental health problems, alcohol and substance abuse, social isolation . </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-existing vulnerabilities </li></ul>
  11. 11. Types of national society response <ul><li>Reliance on continuation and expansion of existing programme activities: food, clothing, social assistance, support for medical attention </li></ul><ul><li>Psycho-social support programmes for disaster victims being adapted </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing role of and demand for cash: not for shopping but for paying utility bills </li></ul><ul><li>Innovative partnerships with utility companies to help keep electricity on over the winter </li></ul><ul><li>Intensified policy dialogue with governments and international institutions </li></ul>
  12. 12. National society responses: some specific examples <ul><ul><li>Finnish Red Cross: expanding advisory and practical support services based on retired social workers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hungarian Red Cross: negotiations with utility companies to waive reconnection penalty fees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two thirds of EU national societies included some food in their response </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Danish Red Cross decided to reorient the national society domestic activities in a more social direction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Georgian Red Cross established a platform of RC, government and elderly to ensure this group was supported </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Icelandic Red Cross added PSP to its social activities </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Did we learn anything from this? <ul><ul><li>If noting else, that we need to think more about how we support national societies affected by economic crises </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Need to develop our conceptual approaches: humanitarian consequences stem from sources other than natural disasters and armed conflict </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A humanitarian crisis may occur within a broadly positive development trend </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The importance of ensuring mutual peer-to-peer support for dialogue with individual governments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Need for continuing analysis, dialogue with national societies and, eventually, policy development </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Future directions? <ul><ul><li>With S2020 there is an updated strategic framework better able to accommodate new ideas on response to humanitarian consequences of economic crises </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>National societies emphasise the importance of support for forging new partnerships with government, NGOs and other actors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Further development of cash-based forms of support to individuals and families </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Development of national societies as channels for early-warning information about social crises at the community level </li></ul></ul>

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