Octave - Prototyping Machine Learning Algorithms

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Octave is a high-level language suitable for prototyping learning algorithms.

Octave is primarily intended for numerical computations and provides extensive graphics capabilities for data visualization and manipulation. Octave is normally used through its interactive command line interface, but it can also be used to write non-interactive programs. The syntax is matrix-based and provides various functions for matrix operations. This tool has been in active development for over 20 years.

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Octave - Prototyping Machine Learning Algorithms

  1. 1. No Rights Reserved. ... a simple toolkit for prototyping ML applications craigtrim@gmail.com June, 2014
  2. 2. No Rights Reseved.2 Installation  Octave is a high-level language suitable for prototyping learning algorithms.  Octave is primarily intended for numerical computations and provides extensive graphics capabilities for data visualization and manipulation. Octave is normally used through its interactive command line interface, but it can also be used to write non-interactive programs.  The syntax is matrix-based and provides various functions for matrix operations.  Octave has been in development for over 20 years  For instructions on setting up the latest version on Cygwin – http://www.gnu.org/software/octave/  For the latest executable binary (3.6.4, used in this tutorial) • http://preview.tinyurl.com/k3n6s4u
  3. 3. No Rights Reseved.3 Variable Assignments >> a = 3; The semicolon suppresses output at the prompt. Supressing output is useful when working with very large matrices. >> c = (3 >= 1); >> c 1 If the output of a variable is supressed, it can be examined at any time by typing that variable's name on the command prompt. References:  GNU Tutorial: – http://www.gnu.org/software/octave/doc/inter preter/Variables.html#Variables – The name of a variable must be a sequence of letters, digits and underscores, but it may not begin with a digit. – Octave does not enforce a limit on the length of variable names – The following are all valid variable names • x • x15 • __foo_bar_baz__ • fucnrdthsucngtagdjb – Case is significant in variable names. The symbols a and A are distinct variables. – There is one built-in variable with a special meaning. The ans variable always contains the result of the last computation.
  4. 4. No Rights Reseved.4 Examining Variables in Memory who whos Both of these commands will show the in-memory variables. After running the last operation, we have >> whos Variables in the current scope: Attr Name Size Bytes Class ==== ==== ==== ===== ===== c 1x1 1 logical Total is 1 element using 1 byte Variables can be cleared from memory using the clear command: >> clear c >> whos After running this command, I type in whos again, and nothing happens. References:  GNU Tutorial: – http://www.gnu.org/software/octave/doc/interprete – When creating simple one-shot programs it can be very convenient to see which variables are available at the prompt. The functions • who • whos • whos_line_format will show different information about what is in memory.
  5. 5. No Rights Reseved.5 Displaying Variables >> a = pi; >> a 3.1416 >> disp(sprintf('%0.2f', a)) 3.14 >> format long >> a 3.14159265358979 >> format short >> a 3.1416 The short datatype is default. References:  GNU Tutorial:
  6. 6. No Rights Reseved.6 Elementary Math Operations >> 21+21 42 >> 6*7 42 >> 84/2 42 >> 2^5+2^4-2^3+2 42 References:  GNU Tutorial: – http://www.gnu.org/software/octave/doc/interprete – Unless otherwise noted, all of the functions described in this chapter will work for real and complex scalar, vector, or matrix arguments. Functions described as mapping functions apply the given operation individually to each element when given a matrix argument. For example:
  7. 7. No Rights Reseved.7 Logical Operations >> 2 == 2 1 >> 1 == 2 0 >> 1 ~= 2 1 >> 1 && 0 0 >> 1 || 0 1 >> xor(1, 0) 1 References:  GNU Tutorial: – http://www.gnu.org/software/octave/doc/interpreter/Logica • Octave has built-in support for logical values, i.e., variables that are either true or false. – http://www.gnu.org/software/octave/doc/interpreter/Boolea • An element-by-element boolean expression is a combination of comparison expressions using the boolean operators “or” (‘|’), “and” (‘&’), and “not” (‘!’), along with parentheses to control nesting
  8. 8. No Rights Reseved.8 Matrix Generation: Manual Assignment of a Matrix Assigning Matrices: >> A = [ 1 2 3 ; 4 5 6 ; 7 8 9 ] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 The semicolon tells Octave to go to the next row of the matrix. References:  GNU Tutorial:
  9. 9. No Rights Reseved.9 Matrix Generation: Manual Assignment of a Vector >> V = [ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 ] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 This is a 1x10 matrix, also known as a row vector. If I wanted to create a 10x1 matrix, I would issue this command in Octave: >> V = [1 ; 2 ; 3 ; 4 ; 5 ; 6 ; 7 ; 8 ; 9 ; 0 ] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 Conceptual Review:  A vector is: – An ordered collection of numbers. – A special type of matrix (rectangular array of numbers). – A column matrix, meaning that you have just one column and a certain number of rows.  When you create a vector: – you write the numbers in a column surrounded by brackets.  The names of vectors: – are usually written as single, boldfaced, lowercase letters.  The size of a vector: – is determined by its rows or how many numbers it has. References:  GNU Tutorial:
  10. 10. No Rights Reseved.10 Matrix Generation: Assigning Ranges >> v = [0:50] 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 … 50 This creates a vector that starts at element 0, ends at element 50, and increments by 1 (the default value). It is possible to use ranges and specify an increment. Note that Elements 12 – 49 are not shown to save space. Commands: v = [ x : y ] x = start y = end References:  GNU Tutorial:
  11. 11. No Rights Reseved.11 Matrix Generation: Assigning Ranges using Increments >> v = [0:5:50] 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 This creates a vector that starts at element 0, ends at element 50, and increments by 5. The increment can be any value we want: >> v = [0:pi:50] 0.00000 3.14159 6.28319 9.42478 12.56637 15.70796 18.84956 21.99115 25.13274 28.27433 31.41593 34.55752 37.69911 40.84070 43.98230 47.12389 >> v = [0:e:50] 0.00000 2.71828 5.43656 8.15485 10.87313 13.59141 16.30969 19.02797 21.74625 24.46454 27.18282 29.90110 32.61938 35.33766 38.05595 40.77423 43.49251 46.21079 48.92907 Commands: v = [ x : n : y ] x = start y = end n = increment References:  GNU Tutorial:
  12. 12. No Rights Reseved.12 Matrix Generation: Generating Matrices of 0’s and 1’s >> zeros(4,4) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 >> ones(4,4) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Matrix generations can be used in variable assignments: >> A = ones(2,5) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 The use of the ones or zeros keyword is not limited to matrices. I can use the same for vectors: >> v = zeros(1,9) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 >> v = ones(1,9) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Commands: A = zeros(x, y) A = ones(x, y) References:  GNU Tutorial:
  13. 13. No Rights Reseved.13 Matrix Generation: Generating n-Value Matrices (1-2) Simply create a ones matrix, and multiply by n, where n is any number: >> 9 * ones(9, 9) 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 Or using decimals >> 0.25 * ones(2,5) 0.25000 0.25000 0.25000 0.25000 0.25000 0.25000 0.25000 0.25000 0.25000 0.25000 Commands: A = n * ones(x, y); References:  GNU Tutorial:
  14. 14. No Rights Reseved.14 Matrix Generation: Generating n-Value Matrices (2-2) Generating a matrix with irrational numbers: >> C = pi * ones(3,3) 3.1416 3.1416 3.1416 3.1416 3.1416 3.1416 3.1416 3.1416 3.1416 >> format long >> C 3.14159265358979 3.14159265358979 3.14159265358979 3.14159265358979 3.14159265358979 3.14159265358979 3.14159265358979 3.14159265358979 3.14159265358979 Note the use of format long to display the elements with more precision. Commands: A = n * ones(x, y); References:  GNU Tutorial:
  15. 15. No Rights Reseved.15 Matrix Generation: The Identity Matrix This will create a multiplicative identity matrix – defined as a square matrix with a diagonal of ones running from top- left to lower-right. >> eye(4) Diagonal Matrix 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 Commands: A = eye(x, y) References:  GNU Tutorial: Conceptual Review:  What is an identity matrix? – Matrices can be square, identity, triangular, singular - or not. – The two different types of identity matrices are somewhat related to the two identity numbers in arithmetic. • The additive identity in arithmetic is 0. If you add 0 to a number, you don’t change the number - the number keeps its identity. – The same idea works for the multiplicative identity: The multiplicative identity in arithmetic is 1. • You multiply any number by 1, and the number keeps its original identity. – The multiplicative identity for matrices has one thing in common with theadditive identity and, then, one big difference. • The common trait of the multiplicative identity is that the multiplicative identity also comes in many sizes; • The difference is that the multiplicative identity comes in only one shape: a square. • A square matrix is n × n; the number of rows and number of columns is the same.  Octave will let you create a non-square identity matrix – but in this case, it's not a proper identity matrix if it's not square.
  16. 16. No Rights Reseved.16 Matrix Generation: The Magic Matrix I can use this command for MxN matrices: A = fix(rand(3, 5) * 10) 2 0 9 8 6 3 0 2 7 9 1 5 6 1 1 but this is easier for square (NxN) matrices: A = magic(5) 17 24 1 8 15 23 5 7 14 16 4 6 13 20 22 10 12 19 21 3 11 18 25 2 9 Note that all magic matrices have to be square, so I still need a fix(rand(x,y)*10) command if I want a non-square matrix. Commands: w = magic(x, y); Conceptual Overview:  Magic matrices have a mathematical property that all their rows and columns and diagonals sum up to the same thing.  While the use of a magic matrix may not have any immediate application in machine learning, it's a helpful way of generating a matrix of whole numbers. References:  GNU Tutorial:
  17. 17. No Rights Reseved.17 Matrix Generation: Random Values >> rand(4,4) 0.729803 0.236942 0.161466 0.023865 0.639122 0.146757 0.689484 0.255327 0.864042 0.412367 0.541050 0.556997 0.560884 0.254363 0.260782 0.734587 This generates random values into either a matrix (above), or a vector (below. >> v = rand(1,5) 0.94561 0.25730 0.77948 0.58087 0.69059 If I want to generate a square matrix of random elements, I can omit the y value, and simply type: >> rand(4) 0.57236 0.50242 0.32187 0.63812 0.32134 0.85426 0.26143 0.61013 0.35396 0.92741 0.66957 0.32677 0.29163 0.66729 0.84041 0.82068 to generate a 4x4 matrix. Commands: w = rand(x, y); References:  GNU Tutorial:
  18. 18. No Rights Reseved.18 Matrix Generation: Negative Values (1-2) All the examples from the previous slide apply, but the use of randn will be permitted to generate negative values. Not all values will be negative. For example: >> randn(4) 0.204915 -2.161812 1.225799 0.927005 -0.416605 1.092304 0.998591 -0.221070 0.314358 0.874479 0.153042 -0.065082 -0.754553 -1.529642 0.316105 -0.547542 Or as this sequence demonstrates: >> w = randn 0.31763 >> w = randn 0.14623 >> w = randn -0.56862 Commands: w = randn(x, y); References:  GNU Tutorial:
  19. 19. No Rights Reseved.19 Matrix Generation: Negative Values (2-2) If I want to make a scalar, vector or matrix negative, it's simply a matter of prefixing this value with a negative sign. >> v = fix(rand(1,5)*10) 7 7 5 5 7 >> -v -7 -7 -5 -5 -7 and I can make it positive by using the abs command. >> abs(-v) 7 7 5 5 7 Commands: w = randn(x, y); References:  GNU Tutorial:
  20. 20. No Rights Reseved.20 Mathematic Operations: Matrix Multiplication Given two matrices: >> A = [ randperm(3); randperm(3) ] 2 1 3 1 3 2 >> B = [ randperm(2); randperm(2); randperm(2)] 2 1 1 2 2 1 I can multiply them to get C: >> C = A * B 11 7 9 9 Multiplying a 2x3 matrix with a 3x2 matrix creates a 2x2 square matrix. Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  21. 21. No Rights Reseved.21 Mathematic Operations: Element-Wise Operations (1-3) Element-wise means acting upon each element in a matrix individually. >> A = fix(rand(3,5) * 10) 8 2 6 1 4 3 2 5 3 8 9 0 7 0 2 >> B = fix(rand(3,5) * 10) 3 9 3 5 8 2 7 7 3 3 4 3 9 6 7 >> C = A .* B 24 18 18 5 32 6 14 35 9 24 36 0 63 0 14 Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  22. 22. No Rights Reseved.22 Mathematic Operations: Element-Wise Operations (2-3) >> B = fix(rand(3, 5) * 10) + 1 9 1 5 9 4 8 2 8 7 5 9 10 5 5 5 >> 1 ./ B .* B 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 multiplying the reciprocal by itself gives a product matrix of ones. Commands: A .^ B 1 ./ v Conceptual Review:  A mathematical expression or function so related to another that their product is one; the quantity obtained by dividing the number one by a given quantity. References:  GNU Tutorial:
  23. 23. No Rights Reseved.23 Mathematic Operations: Element-Wise Operations (3-3) >> a = fix(rand(1,5) * 10) 1 7 9 4 1 >> a > 3 0 1 1 1 0 A vector is returned with truth values for this comparison. The first and last elements of the original vector are less than three. Commands: Conceptual Review: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  24. 24. No Rights Reseved.24 Mathematic Operations: Absolute Values To retrieve the absolute value for any single element, vector of matrix, enclose the value in abs(...). >> abs(randn(3)) 0.53333 0.66756 1.22765 0.68927 1.07300 0.30291 0.75810 2.71484 0.95232 Or, for single values: >> w = randn(); >> c = abs(w); >> w -0.96150 >> c 0.96150 Note the use of w = randn(); or w = rand; Both expressions accomplish the same purpose. Commands: A = abs(x); References:  GNU Tutorial:
  25. 25. No Rights Reseved.25 Mathematic Operations: Computing Logarithms the parameter to this command can be a scalar, vector or matrix. >> A = fix(rand(2,4) * 10)+1 3 2 8 8 7 7 4 6 >> log(A) 1.09861 0.69315 2.07944 2.07944 1.94591 1.94591 1.38629 1.79176 Or use log2 >> w = 2^10 w = 1024 >> log2(w) ans = 10 Commands: log(v) References:  GNU Tutorial:
  26. 26. No Rights Reseved.26 Matrix Operations: The Size Command (1-2) >> eye(5) Diagonal Matrix 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 >> A = eye(5); >> size(A) 5 5 In this example, we create a 5x5 identity matrix, and then get the size from Octave. It returns 1x2 column matrix (vector) containing the values [5 5]. Since the answer is returned as a matrix, we can get the size of this too: >> size(size(A)) 1 2 The size of the vector containing two elements is 1x2. That is, there is one row and two columns. The answer to this initial size command is returned as a 1x2 matrix. Commands: A = size(A, DIM) References:  GNU Tutorial:
  27. 27. No Rights Reseved.27 Matrix Operations: The Size Command (2-2) As a Java developer, I find the following feature of Octave unique, and very useful. A function in Octave can return multiple variables from a function. Let's test this on size: >> [x,y] = size(rand(2,6)); x = 2 y = 6 We create a random 2x6 matrix, and immediately take the size; assigning this to a vector of x and y. X is the number of rows (2) and y is the number of columns (6). We can access these two variables as needed from memory. Rather than creating an eplicit structure to hold multiple values, the language is fully vectorized. I can also use the size command to find the number of rows or columns in a matrix. Given this randomly generated 2x3 matrix: >> M = [randperm(3,3); randperm(3,3);] 3 2 1 1 2 3 Commands: A = size(A, DIM) References:  GNU Tutorial:
  28. 28. No Rights Reseved.28 Matrix Operations: Finding the number of Rows and Columns Assuming we start with this 2x3 matrix: >> A = eye(2,3) 1 0 0 0 1 0 Finding the number of Rows in a Matrix: >> size(M, 1) 2 Finding the number of Columns in a Matrix: >> size(M, 2) 3 Commands: size(A, 1) use this for rows size(A, 2) use this for columns References:  GNU Tutorial:
  29. 29. No Rights Reseved.29 Matrix Operations: Finding the Maximum Value (1-2) The max command returns the maximum value from a vector or matrix Given this vector >> a = [ 50, 29, 283, 12, -94, 8, 0, 24 ]; >> max(a) 283 This is also a helpful command >> [val, ind] = max(a) val = 283 ind = 3 val holds the value of the maximum element and ind is the index into its position within the vector. Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  30. 30. No Rights Reseved.30 Matrix Operations: Finding the Maximum Value (2-2) This can also be applied to a matrix: >> A = fix(rand(3,5)*10)+1 4 2 8 4 9 6 7 7 7 10 2 9 4 8 7 >> [val,ind] = max(A) val = 6 9 8 8 10 ind = 2 3 1 3 2 In this case, a vector is created that holds the maximum values in the matrix. The index may be a little hard to read at first, but it's a vector. Each element position in the vector is the column, the value of the element at that position is the row. So the first element of "2" is column 1, row 2 and the maximum value here is 6. If I wanted to return a single maximum value for a matrix, just use max twice: >> [val,ind] = max(max(A)) val = 10 ind = 5 Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  31. 31. No Rights Reseved.31 Matrix Operations: Length of a Matrix or Vector (1-2) Assuming we start with this 2x3 matrix: >> A = eye(2,3) 1 0 0 0 1 0 For matrix objects, the length is the number of rows or columns, whichever is greater. For a vector, which is always a 1xN matrix, this definition makes sense. For any non 1xN matrix, not so much. Using the 2x3 matrix M, defined above, length returns the longest dimension >> length(M) 3 Assuming we start with this vector: >> v = (1:5) 1 2 3 4 5 >> length(v) 5 Commands: length(A) References:  GNU Tutorial:
  32. 32. No Rights Reseved.32 Matrix Operations: Length of a Matrix or Vector (2-2) Assume this matrix >> M 3 1 6 7 5 4 9 2 10 8 5 2 7 8 3 9 1 6 10 4 7 4 10 5 3 8 2 1 6 9 This command length(M(3,:) gives me the length of the third row. This command 6:length(M(3,:) gives me the elements 6 – 10 (where 10 is the length of the row) So the entire command M(3, 4:length(M(3,:))) gives me the elements 4-10 of the third row of matrix M. Commands: length(A) References:  GNU Tutorial:
  33. 33. No Rights Reseved.33 Matrix Operations: Indexing a Matrix Range (1-3) Let's say I create a really large vector of data: >> v = [1:500]; I can slice off any of the elements I want. >> s = v(1:10) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Of course, I don't have to assign this output to a variable. I can use this command to examine the contents on-the-fly: >> v(25:30) 25 26 27 28 29 30 And this works for matrices too: >> M = [ randperm(10,10); randperm(10,10); randperm(10,10)] 3 1 6 7 5 4 9 2 10 8 5 2 7 8 3 9 1 6 10 4 7 4 10 5 3 8 2 1 6 9 This command creates three 1x10 vectors with a random permutation of 1:10, where each value is unique (view help randperm for more information). These three vectors are appended together into a single 3x10 matrix. References:  GNU Tutorial:
  34. 34. No Rights Reseved.34 Matrix Operations: Indexing a Matrix Range (2-3) Given matrix M I can “slice” out any column: >> M 3 1 6 7 5 4 9 2 10 8 5 2 7 8 3 9 1 6 10 4 7 4 10 5 3 8 2 1 6 9 and reutrn the first column: M(:,1) 3 1 6 7 5 4 9 2 10 8 5 2 7 8 3 9 1 6 10 4 7 4 10 5 3 8 2 1 6 9 or return the second column: M(:,2) 3 1 6 7 5 4 9 2 10 8 5 2 7 8 3 9 1 6 10 4 7 4 10 5 3 8 2 1 6 9 or return the third column: M(:,3) 3 1 6 7 5 4 9 2 10 8 5 2 7 8 3 9 1 6 10 4 7 4 10 5 3 8 2 1 6 9 etc. Note that the returned “slice” is a 3x1 matrix (column vector) in this case, not a 1x3 row vector. This makes sense, as we're taking a slice from the column dimension of the matrix. Commands: M(:,n) References:  GNU Tutorial:
  35. 35. No Rights Reseved.35 Matrix Operations: Indexing a Matrix Range (3-3) I can slice out any row dimension using equivalent syntax: Given the same 3x10 matrix M, let's return the third row: >> M(3,:) 3 1 6 7 5 4 9 2 10 8 5 2 7 8 3 9 1 6 10 4 7 4 10 5 3 8 2 1 6 9 If you only want the first n elements of a given row, use this syntax: >> M(3,1:5) 3 1 6 7 5 4 9 2 10 8 5 2 7 8 3 9 1 6 10 4 7 4 10 5 3 8 2 1 6 9 or >> M(3, 6:length(M(3,:))) 3 1 6 7 5 4 9 2 10 8 5 2 7 8 3 9 1 6 10 4 7 4 10 5 3 8 2 1 6 9 Commands: M(n, :) References:  GNU Tutorial:
  36. 36. No Rights Reseved.36 Matrix Operations: Indexing a Specific Element f I want to index into a specific element (or cell) of a Matrix, just use x and y >> M(3,5) 3 1 6 7 5 4 9 2 10 8 5 2 7 8 3 9 1 6 10 4 7 4 10 5 3 8 2 1 6 9 In handwritten notation, this is denoted as Commands: M(x, y) References:  GNU Tutorial:
  37. 37. No Rights Reseved.37 Matrix Operations: Flattening a Matrix Given a 5x2 Matrix denoted Z: >> Z = [ 1 2 ; 3 4 ; 5 6 ; 7 8 ; 9 0 ] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 I can flatten this into a single 10x1 column vector: >> v = Z(:) 1 3 5 7 9 2 4 6 8 0 Commands: M(:) References:  GNU Tutorial:
  38. 38. No Rights Reseved.38 Matrix Operations: Adding Rows and Columns to a Matrix Given: >> M 3 1 6 7 5 4 9 2 10 8 5 2 7 8 3 9 1 6 10 4 7 4 10 5 3 8 2 1 6 9 I can add a column to this matrix: >> [x,y] = size(M); >> M(:,y+1) = [0, 0, 0] 3 1 6 7 5 4 9 2 10 8 0 5 2 7 8 3 9 1 6 10 4 0 7 4 10 5 3 8 2 1 6 9 0 I can add a row to this matrix: >> M(x+1,:) = [zeros(11,1)] 3 1 6 7 5 4 9 2 10 8 0 5 2 7 8 3 9 1 6 10 4 0 7 4 10 5 3 8 2 1 6 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I could also have written that command as: M(x+1,:) = [zeros(length(M),1)] Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  39. 39. No Rights Reseved.39 Matrix Operations: Adding Values to Rows and Columns Given this Vector >> v = fix(rand(1,5) * 10) 2 0 4 6 6 how do I increment each value by 1? >> v + ones(size(v)) 3 1 5 7 7 Create a ones vector and add it to the existing vector. I can increment the original vector by any value n, simply by multiplying the ones vector by n before adding it. >> v + ones(size(v)) * 5 7 5 9 11 11 In this case, I have added 5 to each element in vector v. Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  40. 40. No Rights Reseved.40 Matrix Operations: Rotating a Matrix Assuming we start with this matrix: >> A = eye(4,4) Diagonal Matrix 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 We can rotate this matrix 90° to the right: >> flipud(A) Permutation Matrix 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 Commands: A = flipud(x) flipud means “flip up/down” References:  GNU Tutorial:
  41. 41. No Rights Reseved.41 Matrix Operations: Matrix Transpose (1-3) >> A = fix(rand(2,4)*10) 6 6 4 3 3 3 0 3 >> A' 6 3 6 3 4 0 3 3 The transpose of the sum of two matrices is equal to the sum of the two transposes: >> (A + A)' == A' + A' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Remember that in order for two matrices to be added, the dimensions must be equal Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  42. 42. No Rights Reseved.42 Matrix Operations: Matrix Transpose (2-3) The transpose of the product of two matrices is equal to the product of the two transposes in the opposite order: >> A = fix(rand(3,3) * 10) 4 4 0 4 3 8 8 7 2 >> B = fix(rand(3,3) * 10) 5 6 8 8 3 2 1 4 6 >> (A*B)'==B' * A' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Because matrix dimensions must be equal in multplication, and we are multplying both the original form and the transposed form, I can't see any way for this to work other than the use of square matrices. Implied in this rule is that multiplication is possible (the dimensions fit). Here are two matrices, A and B, their product, the transpose of their product, and the product of their transposes (in reverse order). Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  43. 43. No Rights Reseved.43 Matrix Operations: Matrix Transpose (3-3) Matrix multiplication is not generally commutative, so multiplying AT * BT does not give you the same result as multiplying in the reverse order. >> A 4 5 9 3 7 4 0 6 1 >> B 5 6 8 8 3 2 1 4 6 >> A' * B' 38 41 16 115 73 69 77 86 31 >> B' * A' 69 75 49 75 55 22 96 62 18 Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  44. 44. No Rights Reseved.44 Matrix Operations: Creating Matrix Subsets >> a = [1 7 9 4 1]; >> find(a > 3) 2 3 4 >> A = fix(rand(5,3) * 10) 3 2 2 5 0 5 9 7 0 4 4 7 0 6 1 >> find(A > 3) 2 3 4 8 9 10 12 14 Using find on a matrix will return a column vector of elements that meet the criteria. Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  45. 45. No Rights Reseved.45 Control Operations: For Loop Let's create a for loop to demonstrate powers of 2. We'll put powers of two up to n into a vector. >> n = 30; >> v = (zeros(n, 1)); >> for i = 1:n, v(i) = 2^i; end; 2 4 8 16 32 64 128 256 ... 268435456 536870912 1073741824 Note that I could leave this out – where I initialize the vector to zeros. Without this line, the vector would default to a row vector (1xN matrix). Because it's easier to display a long list of numbers as a column vector, I prefer to initialize the vector first to a Nx1 matrix (column vector). Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  46. 46. No Rights Reseved.46 Control Operations: While Loop >> x = 1; y = 10; >> v = zeros(y, x); >> while x <= y, v(x) = 42; x = x + 1; end; 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 42 Again, a preference for creating a column vector (YxX Matrix) Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  47. 47. No Rights Reseved.47 Control Operations: Break Statements >> i = 1; >> while true, v(i) = 42; i++, if i==5, break; end; end; 42 42 42 42 Any control statement can be formatted onto a single line: >> while true, v(i) = 42; i++, if i==5, break; end; end; 42 42 42 42 Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  48. 48. No Rights Reseved.48 Functions: Creating a Function (1-3) Create this function as a file called “sq.m”: function y = sq(x) y = x^2; Save this to a path on your computer. I prefer to use my base installation path for Octave, and a sub-directory called “functions”: C:SoftwareOctave-3.6.4functions If I navigate to this directory, I can call this function from Octave like this: >> x = sq(42) 1764 Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  49. 49. No Rights Reseved.49 Functions: Creating a Function (2-3) A preferred approach is to add this directory to the search path for Octave. Once I do this, I can navigate any where on the file system within Octave, and the intepreter will still be able to find the functions that I have defined in saved in the above path. addpath( "c:/Software/Octave-3.6.4/functions") I prefer to add this to the octaverc file. This is located at C:SoftwareOctave3.6.4shareoctavesitem startupoctaverc on my installation. Each time Octave starts up, this search path will be loaded. I'm going to quit Octave, restart, and try this. And now it works. Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  50. 50. No Rights Reseved.50 Functions: Creating a Function (3-3) Let's create another useful function. Earlier in this tutorial, I was generating matrices of uneven dimensions, where each element was a whole number greater than 0. Let's take that code, and define a function: function y = gen(x,y) y = fix(rand(x,y) * 10) + 1; and save this to a file called “gen.m”. I can use this right away within Octave: >> gen(5,2) 2 2 3 2 6 5 3 7 6 5 Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  51. 51. No Rights Reseved.51 Functions: Returning Multiple Values Octave will allow us return multiple values from a function without the need to define an explict structure to contain them. I'm going to create a file called bam.m: function [a, b, c, d] = bam(x) a = x^2; b = x^3; c = x^4; d = x^5; When I call this from the Octave intepreter, I assign the results into a vector: >> [v1, v2, v3, v4] = bam(10) v1 = 100 v2 = 1000 v3 = 10000 v4 = 100000 Commands: Notes  Although I've defined the function as assigning values to 4 variables, I don't need to use these same variable names when calling the function. I can if I want, but it's not a requirement.  Likewise, although the function is assigning values to four variables, I don't need to use all of these when calling the function. References:  GNU Tutorial:
  52. 52. No Rights Reseved.52 Functions: Returning Multiple Values I can invoke >> [x,y] = bam(42) x = 1764 y = 74088 or >> [x, y, z] = bam(42) x = 1764 y = 74088 z = 3111696 or >> [x, y, z, BLAH] = bam(42) x = 1764 y = 74088 z = 3111696 BLAH = 130691232 This syntax is rather convenient when you need to return multiple values. Commands: References:  GNU Tutorial:
  53. 53. No Rights Reseved.53 File I/O: Basic Commands Note that on the Windows O/S, if you want to use the change directory command, it's been to use this format: cd “C:/Users/SSD256/Desktop/” capture the folder in double quotes, and use forward slashes (rather than the more awkward double back-slashes). The Octave interpreter does not appear to be able to handle enviornment variables, eg cd %var% Commands: pwd print working directory ls list directory cd change directory References:  GNU Tutorial:
  54. 54. No Rights Reseved.54 File I/O: Loading Data I have a file on my root directory with training data. The file is named featureX.dat >> load featuresX.dat This file has been loaded into a variable named “featuresX” (the name of the file). I can interact with this variable: >> whos featuresX Variables in the current scope: Attr Name Size Bytes Class ==== ==== ==== ===== ===== featuresX 43180x2 690880 double Total is 86360 elements using 690880 bytes >> size(featuresX) 43180 2 >> [x,y] = size(featuresX) x = 43180 y = 2 Note that whos gives all the information that size does. However, if all you're after are the column dimensions, then using the [x,y] assignment shown in the last assessment is certainly easier than trying to parse data from whos. Commands: load <filename> References:  GNU Tutorial:
  55. 55. No Rights Reseved.55 File I/O: Saving Data Assuming I've loaded “featuresX.dat”, I can save a subset to disk using this syntax: >> v = featuresX(2:10); >> save temp.dat v It appears that Octave requires data be assigned to a variable prior to being written to file. This will not work: >> save temp.dat featuresX(2:10) warning: save: no such variable 'featuresX(2:10)‘ This will work >> v = featuresX(2:10); >> save temp.dat v Commands: save <filename> <variable> References:  GNU Tutorial:
  56. 56. No Rights Reseved.56 File I/O: Clearing Data I can clear all memory by simply typing clear I can clear a specific variable, say the file I just loaded, by typing clear(featuresX) and then I can run whos to verify, and no output will result. I can also use regular expressions to identify variables to clear. Commands: clear(x) References:  GNU Tutorial:
  57. 57. No Rights Reseved.57 Data Visualization: Histograms (1-2) >> w = -6 + sqrt(42) * (randn(1,10000)); >> hist(w) Commands: hist(w) References:  GNU Tutorial:
  58. 58. No Rights Reseved.58 Data Visualization: Histograms (2-2) Adding labels, and making the graph pretty: >> hold on >> title "My First Histogram" >> xlabel "time" >> ylabel "space" >> legend ('amount') Note the use of the “hold on” command. This basically tells the compiler: hold on there pal, I got more to add … You will see later that these commands apply to all visualizations we create in Octave. Commands: hist(w) References:  GNU Tutorial:
  59. 59. No Rights Reseved.59 Data Visualization: Color Mapping (1-4) >> A = magic(5); >> imagesc(A); Commands: imagesc(A); References:  GNU Tutorial:
  60. 60. No Rights Reseved.60 Data Visualization: Color Mapping (2-4) >> imagesc(magic(50)), colorbar; Commands: imagesc(A), colorbar; References:  GNU Tutorial:
  61. 61. No Rights Reseved.61 Data Visualization: Color Mapping (3-4) >> imagesc(magic(50)), colorbar, colormap gray; Commands: imagesc(A), colorbar, colormap gray; References:  GNU Tutorial:
  62. 62. No Rights Reseved.62 Data Visualization: Color Mapping (4-4) Let's take another look at this: >> A = magic(5); >> imagesc(A), colorbar, colormap gray; and then if we slice out a cell from this visualized matrix: >> A(3,3) ans = 13 We can see that cell 3,3 on the visualization has a middle shade of gray that corresponds with values in the colorbar Commands: imagesc(A), colorbar, colormap gray; References:  GNU Tutorial:
  63. 63. No Rights Reseved.63 Appendix  Matrixes vs Matrices? – The tendency is to prefer the foreign plural if a word is used in a technical sense, and to prefer the english plural in a non-technical sense. – Therefore: • mathematical formulae v. formulas for success • mathematical indices v. consumer price indexes • mathematical appendices v. appendixes • and hence … matrices v. matrixes – prov:wasQuotedFrom • http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/matrix

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