Comparing & Contrasting Cultures
The Amish
HE Access - Sociological Perspectives:
Comparison of Culture: The Amish
1
The Amish Culture
Roles, norms, values & beliefs
Be not conformed…
 The Amish society has little, if any, desire to
participate in our modern world, doing so
only when ne...
 A very religious people
 The Amish dress in a
particular way:
 With ‘traditional’ plain
dress clothes (passed
down thr...
This presentation will set out to start to
examine their culture:
Focusing on some of the Amish roles, norms and
beliefs i...
Some of their core beliefs are:
 The church is a covenant community
 ‘Errant’ members are excluded from communion
(and i...
Amish Culture
The Amish belief system rules, religion &
lifestyle
Amish Religious Life
 Amish are Christians, with all traditional
Christian beliefs in the Divinity of Christ, the
Trinity...
Examples of Practices Prescribed by
the Ordnung:
 color and style of clothing
 hat styles for men
 order of the worship...
 air transportation
 central heating in homes
 electricity from public power lines
 entering military service
 jewelr...
Yielding or submission …
 Within the Amish community, a term is often
used to describe their life style. This word is
Gel...
Old Order Amish
Old Order Amish ‘roles, values or
beliefs’?
Old Order Amish
 It is the picture of the
Old Order Amish with
their plain clothes and
buggies that usually
springs to mi...
 The Old Order still dress plainly; they do not use
electricity; they do not own or drive cars, do not have
telephones in...
The Old Order: Some Characteristics
HE Access - Sociological Perspectives:
Comparison of Culture: The Amish
15
 Strict clothing regulations:
 Men wear black suits without lapels or buttons,
 white or blue shirts,
 black braces, b...
 Men crop their hair, and
wear beards, if married,
but not mustaches as
they are associated with
the military.
 Women do...
 The Old Order Amish make their own clothes, although
they do purchase the fabric. Hats, braces, and shoes can
be bought ...
New Order Amish
Similarities and differences to Old Order Amish
Different ‘roles, values or beliefs’?
New Order Amish
 The important thing to remember when studying the
Amish is that there are many variations within the
cul...
New Order Amish
 For example, New Order Amish vary greatly from
the Old Order in daily life, but not in religious
practic...
Amish Culture
The essential and pivotal role of the Family
 Families are a cornerstone of the Amish
community, and as such, marriage is an
important part of life.
 Nine out of eve...
Amish and The Family
 Most couples meet at “singings,” which are similar
to country dances. Both must be members of the
c...
Amish and The Family
 Children are usually born at
home and attend school only
through the eighth grade (12-
14).
 Amish...
 In Amish society, woman are viewed as equal
partners in the marriage, but it is the man
who holds authority in the famil...
Amish Culture
The role of the Collaboration &
Community
Amish Collaboration & Community
 Amish ‘barn rising’ is
another aspect of their
culture that most
people know about.
 Th...
 During one day work/social events, like the barn
raising, hundreds of people come together
 This is the way that school...
Amish Culture
Youth Culture & ‘Gangs’
 The Rumspringa is a time of life for Amish that
typically begins at the age of sixteen and lasts until
they are married....
 While some gangs are reserved and do no more wild
behavior than hold a dance on Saturday night or a
volleyball game, oth...
Amish Culture
Conclusion
 The Amish today face increasing pressure to
conform to the world. Until now they have
managed to meld modernity with the...
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HE Access Week 3: Amish Culture

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Material relevant to the first assignment - the comparing and contrasting of two different cultures.

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  • HE Access: Sociological Perspectives Blackburn College - HE Access: Sociological Perspectives
  • HE Access: Sociological Perspectives Blackburn College - HE Access: Sociological Perspectives
  • HE Access: Sociological Perspectives Blackburn College - HE Access: Sociological Perspectives
  • HE Access Week 3: Amish Culture

    1. 1. Comparing & Contrasting Cultures The Amish HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 1
    2. 2. The Amish Culture Roles, norms, values & beliefs
    3. 3. Be not conformed…  The Amish society has little, if any, desire to participate in our modern world, doing so only when necessary.  Avoiding technology  Preserving traditions  Maintaining strict and clearly defined gender roles … HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 3
    4. 4.  A very religious people  The Amish dress in a particular way:  With ‘traditional’ plain dress clothes (passed down through generations)  With hats for men and headdress for women HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 4
    5. 5. This presentation will set out to start to examine their culture: Focusing on some of the Amish roles, norms and beliefs in more depth, In doing this, we can then compare the Amish culture to more contemporary westernised / consumer culture. HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 5
    6. 6. Some of their core beliefs are:  The church is a covenant community  ‘Errant’ members are excluded from communion (and in extreme cases, the community)  They follow a strict and literal obedience to the teachings of Christ  They reject violence (and therefore war) HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 6
    7. 7. Amish Culture The Amish belief system rules, religion & lifestyle
    8. 8. Amish Religious Life  Amish are Christians, with all traditional Christian beliefs in the Divinity of Christ, the Trinity, salvation, etc.  The Ordnung, roughly translated it means order, is a set of oral laws which regulate all aspects of Amish society, from religion to family life.  It is not something written down, instead all Amish verbally pass it on HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 8
    9. 9. Examples of Practices Prescribed by the Ordnung:  color and style of clothing  hat styles for men  order of the worship service  kneeling for prayer in worship  marriage within the church  use of horses for fieldwork  use of Pennsylvania German  steel wheels on machinery HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 9
    10. 10.  air transportation  central heating in homes  electricity from public power lines  entering military service  jewelry, including wedding rings and wrist watches  joining worldly (public) organizations  owning computers, televisions, radios  using tractors for fieldwork  wall-to-wall carpeting (Kraybill 116) Examples of things prohibited by the Ordnung HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 10
    11. 11. Yielding or submission …  Within the Amish community, a term is often used to describe their life style. This word is Gelassenheit. It means, roughly translated, a yielding or submission, and it signifies the Amish life.  Gelassenheit involves submission to the family, submission to the community, submission to tradition, submission to the Ordnung, submission to the church, and, submission to God. HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 11
    12. 12. Old Order Amish Old Order Amish ‘roles, values or beliefs’?
    13. 13. Old Order Amish  It is the picture of the Old Order Amish with their plain clothes and buggies that usually springs to mind, when considering the Amish.  Old Order Amish communities have deviated little from the ‘regulations’ established by Jakob Amman over 300 years ago. Old Order Amish at a horse auction HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 13
    14. 14.  The Old Order still dress plainly; they do not use electricity; they do not own or drive cars, do not have telephones in their homes, and forbid the use of most modern farm equipment, including air-filled tires.  In Old Order Amish homes, all lighting is supplied by candle or oil and gas lamp.  However, bottle-gas appliances are acceptable under the Ordnung, (the verbal standards or rules that the Amish live by). HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 14
    15. 15. The Old Order: Some Characteristics HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 15
    16. 16.  Strict clothing regulations:  Men wear black suits without lapels or buttons,  white or blue shirts,  black braces, black shoes or boots  broad-brimmed hats in black felt or natural straw.  Old Order women wear a frock type dress of mid-calf to ankle length with black stockings,  an apron, black shoes or boots, black cape, and either a white "prayer cap" (if baptized) or a black hood.  The idea behind the dress code is not only that it sets them apart from the world, but that is also eliminates pride and envy. The Old Order: Roles, Values, Norms? HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 16
    17. 17.  Men crop their hair, and wear beards, if married, but not mustaches as they are associated with the military.  Women do not cut their hair but wear it tied in a bun on their head, which is always covered once she is baptized. The Old Order: Roles, Values, Norms? HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 17
    18. 18.  The Old Order Amish make their own clothes, although they do purchase the fabric. Hats, braces, and shoes can be bought ready-made.  The buggies they drive vary according to purpose. The “family” buggy will always be covered. Young people drive open buggies, such as the one in the photo above. HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 18
    19. 19. New Order Amish Similarities and differences to Old Order Amish Different ‘roles, values or beliefs’?
    20. 20. New Order Amish  The important thing to remember when studying the Amish is that there are many variations within the culture. Some are more strict then others in matters of religion and society codes. Adherence varies from affiliation to affiliation: some allow one thing while banning another. HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 20
    21. 21. New Order Amish  For example, New Order Amish vary greatly from the Old Order in daily life, but not in religious practice.  New Order Amish are more progressive than the Old Order but still restrictive in the use of modern items.  They use telephones in their homes, allow air operated equipment, electrical generators, bicycles, and gas pressurized lights. They also allow the use of rubber air- filled tires. However, horses are still mandated for field work and transportation. They do not own or drive cars. HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 21
    22. 22. Amish Culture The essential and pivotal role of the Family
    23. 23.  Families are a cornerstone of the Amish community, and as such, marriage is an important part of life.  Nine out of every ten adult Amish are married. HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 23
    24. 24. Amish and The Family  Most couples meet at “singings,” which are similar to country dances. Both must be members of the church to marry.  The Amish believe large families are a blessing from God, so contraception is not practiced. The typical Amish family has 8.5 children.  By the age of forty-five, an Amish woman has probably given birth to seven children.  Under the Ordnung, divorce is not allowed HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 24
    25. 25. Amish and The Family  Children are usually born at home and attend school only through the eighth grade (12- 14).  Amish children walk to school, which are usually one room buildings.  After this age, children are schooled at home, learning and working alongside their family until they marry and start a family of their own. HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 25
    26. 26.  In Amish society, woman are viewed as equal partners in the marriage, but it is the man who holds authority in the family and the church.  Wives are expected to submit to their husbands.  All women help with all aspects of family chores, although men seldom help with household type work. Amish, the Family & Women HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 26
    27. 27. Amish Culture The role of the Collaboration & Community
    28. 28. Amish Collaboration & Community  Amish ‘barn rising’ is another aspect of their culture that most people know about.  The barn is started in the morning and finished by that night.  All of the community comes together … HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 28
    29. 29.  During one day work/social events, like the barn raising, hundreds of people come together  This is the way that schools are built, fields are planted  Women may gather to help clean a house or make a quilt.  Women also hold Sisters’ Day, where all the sisters in a family gather one day a month to visit and chat. Amish Collaboration & Community HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 29
    30. 30. Amish Culture Youth Culture & ‘Gangs’
    31. 31.  The Rumspringa is a time of life for Amish that typically begins at the age of sixteen and lasts until they are married. It loosely translates as “sowing wild oats.”  During this time, a young person will join a “gang” with whom they run around with on the weekends.  During this period of their lives, the youth are viewed as falling between the authority of their parents and the church because they are not yet baptized. Youth Culture: Amish Gangs HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 31
    32. 32.  While some gangs are reserved and do no more wild behavior than hold a dance on Saturday night or a volleyball game, others may hold parties where beer kegs will be present, modern music played by live bands with electric instruments, and all attendees dress in secular clothing.  Some gangs place fancy reflective tape on their buggies, which may have a radio or CD player hidden inside. Youth Culture: Amish Gangs HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 32
    33. 33. Amish Culture Conclusion
    34. 34.  The Amish today face increasing pressure to conform to the world. Until now they have managed to meld modernity with their beliefs without much social upheaval.  Only time will tell if they can continue to do so successfully. HE Access - Sociological Perspectives: Comparison of Culture: The Amish 34

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