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20190513 kanban in action workshop - lkna 2019

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This two-part interactive workshop begins with a detailed look at how to interpret Kanban boards and ask thoughtful questions so that you can improve the work of your teams. We will provide an overview of the Kanban Method and then proceed through a series of several short exercises that will give you an opportunity to review and interpret various Kanban board configurations with other attendees at your table.

After a short break, part two of the session now puts the attendees in the driver’s seat to create their own board configurations. We provide several business scenario exercises and ask the attendees how they would go about configuring their Kanban board given the unique system constraints for each scenario.

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20190513 kanban in action workshop - lkna 2019

  1. 1. Mark Grove Craeg Strong Kanban System Design in Context Lean Kanban Global Summit 2019
  2. 2. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong • CTO @ Ariel Partners • 20+ years IT profession • Accredited Kanban Trainer (AKT) • ITIL, DevOps, CEH, and spicy food Craeg StrongMark Grove • Management Consultant @ Excella Consulting • 20+ years IT profession • Accredited Kanban Trainer (AKT) • Amateur photographer and astronomer
  3. 3. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Get to Know Each Other (5 minutes) At your table introduce: • Your name and your current role • The industry in which you work • Your level of Kanban proficiency • Where you are currently using Kanban or where you imagine you could use it Identify a spokesperson for the table When called upon, tell us how your table is represented
  4. 4. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Kanban System Design in Context Observing Flow
  5. 5. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Imagine you were hired to provide consulting assistance for a new team just starting with Kanban. The team has been struggling and is looking forward to your expert guidance, support, and advice. It’s your first day and you just walked into the team room to look at their physical board. You want to make smart observations and thoughtful interpretations so you can have meaningful conversations. The team starts assembling for the daily standup and you plan on making some comments afterwards. What comments would you make? As you review each board, consider the following questions to help you think through your comments to the team (Note: each new board can be treated independently of the others). • What are you observing? • Why might that be happening? • What questions would you ask of the team to learn more? Kanban System Design in Context: Scenario Background
  6. 6. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong To Do Analysis Development Test Done
  7. 7. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Backlog Discovery Implementation Verify Done Doing Done Doing Done JP JP JP JP KMKM KM MK PC JP AB JP DP CS CSMK CW CW JP JP CW JP PC
  8. 8. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong To Do Discovery (3) Implementation (2) Verify (2) Done Doing Done DoneDoing
  9. 9. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Insurance Application Received Risk Review [External Rate Team] Prices Risk Issue Quote Issue Binder Issue Policy Igor Mary Priyanka Progress Towards Monthly Goal
  10. 10. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Ready Discovery (3) Implementation (2) Verify (2) Done Doing Done DoneDoing Blocked (6)
  11. 11. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong To Do Discovery (2) Implementation (3) Verify (3) DoneReady (3) Notify (2) X X XDiscovery Implementation Verify Notify Req. Done X XDiscovery Implementation Verify Notify Req. Done X Discovery Implementation Verify Notify Req. Done X X X X X Implementation Discovery Verify Notify Req. Done X X X X Implementation Discovery Verify Notify Req. Done X X X Implementation Discovery Verify Notify Req. Done X X X Implementation Discovery Verify Notify Req. Done X X X X X Implementation Discovery Verify Notify Req. Done X X X X Implementation Discovery Verify Notify Req. Done
  12. 12. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong To Do Discovery (2) Implementation (3) Verify (3) Done Ready (5) Doing Done Doing Done
  13. 13. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Creating Flow Kanban System Design in Context
  14. 14. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Innovation Team You are working with an innovation team They want to ensure they are always working on a pool of ideas because many are discarded over the course of the workflow: • Ready • Hypothesize • Refine • Explore • Validate • Done How would you visualize this? How would you help them ensure they are always working on enough things?
  15. 15. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Ready Hypothesize Refine Explore Doing Done DoneDoing DoneDoing Validate Done Discarded (7 - 10) (4 - 7) (1 - 4) (4)(8 - ∞)
  16. 16. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Business Development Team A government business development team is tracking the flow of new business opportunities through the pipeline: 1. Unqualified Opportunity 2. Qualified Opportunity 3. Pursue the Opportunity 4. In Development 5. Submitted 6. Won / Lost They want to keep the pipeline full enough to ensure they have enough sales to meet their targets. How will we ensure we keep the pipeline full enough? How could you visualize reasons for losses on the board? They also want to highlight their recent losses so they can learn what went wrong. There is usually more than one reason for each loss. We want to visualize the reasons so we know where to focus our improvement efforts. In order to ensure we have at least 3 wins during each quarter, we will need at least 20 Opportunities, however, we can’t effectively execute pursuit on more than 10 opportunities at once. The team indicates they can’t develop more than 3 opportunity proposals at a time.
  17. 17. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Unqualified Opportunity In Development Submitted Wins this Quarter Pursuit (20- 40) (3) Qualified Opportunity Recent Losses (5 - 10) Top Reasons For Losses $ $ $ $ (10- 20)
  18. 18. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Setting Initial WIP Limits A team wants to start using WIP limits and is looking for guidance. They have told you, on average, they feel they complete about five items per week. They also mentioned they meet with business stakeholders weekly to discuss new items to work on. What board suggestions might you introduce? Why? What WIP limit suggestions would you suggest experimenting with? Why? What other guidance would you give about WIP limits new to a team? This is their current board. The seven person team thinks things will improve if: • The five Developers can experiment with pair programming • The two Testers can work on Test items even when one item is blocked and cannot be worked on You also learn some items in Develop are Done. Options Develop Test Done
  19. 19. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Options Ready Develop TestDoneDoing Done Remember: we need to manage and measure flow! Since they complete five items per week and they meet weekly with the business, we may want to experiment with a WIP limit of five here, thus not committing to more work that they can finish each week. To encourage pairing, experimenting with a WIP limit smaller than the number of developers may be helpful. To allow testers to continue to work even if one item is blocked, you may experiment with setting a WIP limit greater than the number of testers. (5) (3) (3)
  20. 20. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Working With Dependencies & Handoffs*With Thanks to Ian Carroll! An HR team has the following types of work: 1. Recruitment 2. Onboarding/offboarding employees 3. Training & Career development 4. Administering Benefits When a given item is in progress, it could have any of these dependencies: 1. IT 2. Facilities 3. Legal 4. Finance Each of those teams has their own Kanban board, but we still want to represent dependencies on our board, and know whether a dependency is in progress or done. A given item may have multiple dependencies, all proceeding at the same time. Once our work plus all of the dependencies are done, we can move a work item to done. How can we visualize our work in progress alongside the four other teams we work with? How could we identify and visualize the next set of work items to work on, while ensuring we address all 4 work types? How can we track the pieces being done by different dependencies so that we know what is remaining?
  21. 21. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong To Do (4) Recruitment Onboarding / Offboarding Next Training & Career Development Administering Benefits DONE a DoneDoing (4) A d a IT Facilities Legal Finance b b db CB D d a
  22. 22. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Research Team You’re working for a research team that gradually refines and improves the items that they work on; they have just four basic steps in their workflow: • Options • Ready • In Progress • Done (Ready for Production) The “In Progress” step involves a lot of work; ideas move along two dimensions: • They become progressively more refined (fewer open questions) • They also become more production-ready (the associated processes become better known) They believe that those two dimensions are important to model and that neither one has a well-defined sequence of steps. How would you go about helping them visualize their work? How would you help them introduce WIP limits?
  23. 23. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Options Ready In Progress Done MoreRefined More Production Ready (3)(3)
  24. 24. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Options Ready In Progress Done MoreRefined More Production Ready (3)(3)
  25. 25. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong One Team, Three Work Types A sales team has identified three work types as part of its sales pipeline: Cold Calls, Referrals, and Existing Clients. Cold calls and Referrals are first vetted for suitability before the sales team commits to pursuing them. Existing Clients do not need this vetting. The downstream workflow is (Initial Contact, Proposal, Client Negotiation, Completed) The sales team is interested in visualizing its pipeline wins or losses once the work is completed. How would you visualize the upstream vetting process? How would you visualize the downstream flow for the three work types? What about their desire to visually see wins vs. losses? Though not explicitly discussed above, how might you envision using WIP limits?
  26. 26. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Sales Lead Options Vetting Proposal (2) Completed Doing Ready DoingDoing Done Done Work Type Cold Calls Referrals Existing (≥1) (3) (4) Discard Win Loss Initial Contact (2) Client Negotiation (2)
  27. 27. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong IT Portfolio Management*With Thanks to Pawel Brodzinski! You are working with a CIO of an organization who needs to manage a portfolio of 8 projects across 4 teams. • The Teams are “Team A” through “Team D.” • The Projects are “Alpha” through “Theta” Projects are either Strategic or Tactical. During a given calendar quarter, a Team can work on: • three small projects, • one large project, or • one medium + one small project at a time. How might you go about helping the CIO visualize his portfolio over the next 4 quarters? Project Alpha Project Beta Project Gamma Project Delta Project Epsilon Project Zeta Project Eta Project Theta Tactical or Strategic Strategic Tactical Tactical Tactical Strategic Strategic Tactical Tactical S / M / L Small Medium Small Medium Large Medium Small Small Team Team A Team A Team B Team B Team C Team D Team D Team D Start Q1 Q1 Q2 Q1 Q1 ½ way thru Q1 Q1 Q1 Projected Finish Q4+ ½ way thru Q2 Q4+ Q3 Q4 Q4 Q1 Q2
  28. 28. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Q1 Team A Beta Eta Strategic Tactical Q2 Q3 Q4 Team B Team C Team D GammaGammaGamma Epsilon ZetaZetaZeta Zeta Theta Theta DeltaDeltaDelta Alpha EpsilonEpsilonEpsilon Alpha Alpha Alpha Beta
  29. 29. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Creating Flow Questions?
  30. 30. Kanban System Design in Context: Mark Grove & Craeg Strong Thank You! Kanban System Design in Context

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