Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Disruption: Alternative Museum Practices That Yield Engaging and Strategic Results

25 views

Published on

A brief overview on the context of engagement in museum sectors today, and then 3 case studies succinctly summarized: intention, success, failure. And then an informed and facilitated discussion with the audience.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Disruption: Alternative Museum Practices That Yield Engaging and Strategic Results

  1. 1. Disruption Alternative Museum Practices that Yield Engaging and Strategic Results David Alexander Corey Timpson Sandra Corbeil Daniel Boivin @david_alexander @coreytimpson @SLCorbeil @MuseumOfNature
  2. 2. Rapid and exponential changes in technology. > Behavioral change. > Evolving visitor expectations. Problem
  3. 3. Museums response towards audience engagement in this scenario. > Meeting expectations > Exploiting tactics and technology > Building engagement… > Yet remaining meaningful and respectful of due diligent museological best practices. Continuing to be trusted sources of knowledge. Solution
  4. 4. Canadian Museum for Human Rights > Points of View: A National Human Rights Photography Exhibition Ingenium (CMST) > Innovation 150 Digital Storybook Canadian Museum of Nature > Arctic Beyond Ice Projects
  5. 5. Points of View Canadian Museum for Human Rights
  6. 6. Mandate . encourage reflection & dialogue Audience Engagement . audience development . museum reach . visitation (physical, digital) Collections & Content . collections building Objectives
  7. 7. Mandate . encourage reflection & dialogue Audience Engagement . audience development . museum reach . visitation (physical, digital) Collections & Content . collections building Objectives RESPONSE > multiple perspectives > different demographics > across the country > in-gallery & remote experience Collections & Content > submission criteria
  8. 8. . National “Call for Participation” . Advertised nationally (print & digital) . Juried process (curator + 4 HR scholars and activists) . Web submission . Submission = perpetual, royalty-free license to CMHR . Canada 150 Themes (Reconciliation, Inclusive/Diversity, Environment + Freedom of Expression . Youth Submission Category POV Details
  9. 9. . 1000 submissions . all available for acquisition . 72 selected for exhibition . category winners translated into tactile/described photos . exhibition catalogue (72) . opening exhibition had 72 highly engaged audience members (social opps) . People’s Choice (social, viral) in-gallery & online . 9028 going through proposed acquisition process . Traveling Versions (Nano = Calgary x 2; Portugal, Spain, + more) POV Summary
  10. 10. Challenges . terms of reference for submission . some pushback on licensing from potential submitters . tactile translation . curatorial voice vs Canadians at large (distinction) Opportunities Realized . engaged people from across the country for Canada 150 . increased collection . wide reach of museum’s presence (physically and digitally / 24000+ votes) . democratized curatorial/content development process POV Conclusions
  11. 11. https://photo.humanrights.ca/
  12. 12. ↗ DISRUPTION: ALTERNATIVE MUSEUM PRACTICES THAT YIELD ENGAGING AND STRATEGIC RESULTS A STORY OF CROWDSOURCING CMA 2018 Presentation by Sandra Corbeil scorbeil@IngeniumCanada.ca @SLCorbeil
  13. 13. Crowdsourcing - A new approach • Historically, museums have provided “expert” interpretation of public history. Traditional stewardship of knowledge is breaking down. Traditional institutional authority is being disrupted. • Digital disruption and social media have transformed expectations and audiences expect participation and engagement Audiences and partners becoming part of content ecosystem Demand for direct access Mobile access anytime, anywhere
  14. 14. WHAT DID IT TAKE ↗ We needed to let go and to share authority ↗ We needed to be “Open” ↗ We made the conscious decision to engage with constituents ↗ We needed to embrace a participatory approach
  15. 15. EMBRACING A PARTICIPATORY APPROACH Open Dialogue with citizens Crowdsourcing Shared authority Multiple voices Audiences and partners becoming part of content ecosystem
  16. 16. ↗ Connect ↗ Metrics on site use ↗ Engage ↗ # stories shared and # accounts ↗ Diversity of content partners ↗ Empower innovation in a digital culture This fosters partnerships with ↗ those who want to join and contribute ↗ those who want to collaborate ↗ those who want to know more about our process DEFINING SUCCESS Engage Empower Connect
  17. 17. METRICS
  18. 18. STRATEGIC RESULTS
  19. 19. “Beyond Ice” Canada Goose Arctic Gallery Dan Boivin - Canadian Museum of Nature
  20. 20. Build an emotional connection to the Arctic
  21. 21. Create a memorable experience
  22. 22. Enter: partnership with NFB interactive projects
  23. 23. Creating a safe “sandbox” to create in
  24. 24. Authenticity vs artifice
  25. 25. Where no-one had gone before...
  26. 26. Chaos or control?
  27. 27. First timer courage
  28. 28. From dreams to reality
  29. 29. Chaired by David Alexander | @david_alexander Royal BC Museum Points of View: A National Human Rights Photography Exhibition . Canadian Museum for Human Rights . Corey Timpson | @coreytimpson Innovation 150 Digital Storybook . Ingenium . Sandra Corbeil | @SLCorbeil Arctic Above Ice . Canadian Museum of Nature . Daniel Boivin | @MuseumOfNaure Q&A

×