Writing For Public Relations: What Makes News

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Writing For Public Relations: What Makes News With Modern Media introduces public relations students elements that media outlets consider newsworthy. It represents about 10 percent of the material covered in class.

It was presented by Richard Becker, ABC, president of Copywrite, Ink., at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

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  • Writing For Public Relations: What Makes News

    1. 1. NEWS STORIES WHAT MAKES THE NEWS WITH MODERN MEDIA Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    2. 2. WHY DO SOME STORIES SWIM? AND OTHERS SINK? Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    3. 3. top mass media top trade press national radio trade press local broadcast local news WHY DO SOME STORIES SWIM? local niche news blogs AND OTHERS SINK? news wires company sites pr networks office memos archives trash cans Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    4. 4. APPROXIMATELY 1.4 MILLION NEWS STORIES PER DAY. APPROXIMATELY 4.3 MILLION NEWS RELEASES PER DAY. Approximation based on total number of U.S. news outlets (print, electronic, broadcast) averaging 20 stories per day, and receiving 80 to 100 direct releases per day. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    5. 5. THE MAJORITY OF STORIES ARE NOT DRIVEN BY PR. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    6. 6. MAYBE 140,000 STORIES ARE DRIVEN BY PR. APPROXIMATELY 4.3 MILLION NEWS RELEASES PER DAY. Approximation based on 10 percent of news being PR driven. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    7. 7. WHAT MAKES THOSE STORIES STAND OUT? Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    8. 8. WHAT MAKES THOSE STORIES STAND OUT? “Hi!” Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    9. 9. “Woo hoo.” OF ALL FISH STORIES, NEMO HAS IT ALL. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    10. 10. HIS STORY HAS IMPACT. Nemo’s story initially touches one community, but grew in magnitude as his father searched for him. • How much of an audience is affected? • How direct and immediate is the impact? • How much magnitude does the story have? How does this apply to Haiti? Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    11. 11. HIS STORY HAS PROXIMITY. Nemo’s story has a proximity that ranges from Papua, New Guinea to Sydney, Australia. • How close is the action to a locality? • How direct to a specific industry? • How close is the connection to an audience? How does this apply to the iPad? Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    12. 12. HIS STORY HAS TIMELINESS. Nemo’s story is told in real time. • How fresh is the story? • When did the action occur? • Is the action occurring right now? How does this apply to the Olympics? Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    13. 13. HIS STORY HAS IMPORTANCE. For his friends in the fish tank, Nemo’s story becomes the catalyst for change. • How will it change people’s lives? • How dramatic will that change be? • What are the consequences of that change? How does this apply to health care? Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    14. 14. HIS STORY HAS PROMINENCE. As his father, Marlin, continues to search, Nemo gains exposure and prominence. • Who is involved in the story? • Do most people know the company? • Are any famous people touched by it? How does this apply to Toyota? Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    15. 15. HIS STORY HAS CONFLICT. There are dozens of conflicts in the story, ranging from sharks to deep sea dwellers. • How volatile are the combatants? • How colorful is their argument? • How rash or threatening are their actions? How does this apply to Sarah Palin? Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    16. 16. HIS STORY HAS NOVELTY. Dory demonstrates a novelty when she claims that she can speak whale. • How often does it occur? • Is it uncommon and unexpected? • Is there a novelty that people will enjoy? How does this apply to classic novelty? Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    17. 17. HIS STORY HAS HUMAN INTEREST. There are several acts of kindness in the movie, including those that require risking life and fin. • How touching is the story? • How direct or great is the gift? • How human and hopeful is the content? How does this apply to Make A Wish? Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    18. 18. HIS STORY HAS SENSITIVITY. There are several touching moments in the story, especially as the characters face loss. • How disastrous is the result? • How emotional are the people involved? • How misfortunate and sad is the tragedy? How does it apply to Jacqueline Blake? Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    19. 19. HIS STORY HAS SPECIAL INTEREST. Few stories become huge like Nemo. But even if it didn’t become huge, someone cares. • Does a niche publication cover the topic? • Is the story specialized enough? • Does the material match the news outlet? How does it apply to science? Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    20. 20. DOES YOUR NEWS RELEASE RISE ABOVE? • Impact • Conflict • Proximity • Novelty • Timeliness • Sensitivity • Importance • Special Interest • Prominence • Well Written Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    21. 21. “Oh no.” EVEN IF IT DOES, YOUR STORY MIGHT NOT RUN. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    22. 22. “Oh no.” POPULARITY COULD KILL YOUR STORY. BREAKING NEWS COULD KILL YOUR STORY. AN EDITOR COULD KILL YOUR STORY. A REPORTER COULD SEE A NEW STORY. BAD WRITING COULD BURY YOUR STORY. PR FIRM REPUTATION CAN CAUSE DAMAGE. ASKING FOR AN EMBARGO CAN KILL IT. THE RELEASE NEVER FINDS ITS WAY HOME. SOMEONE MIGHT HAVE A BIGGER NEMO. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    23. 23. MAYBE 140,000 STORIES ARE DRIVEN BY PR. “So please make me look good!” Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    24. 24. Richard R. Becker, ABC President, Copywrite, Ink. copywriteink.com copywriteink.blogspot.com 702.341.7135 "Finding Nemo” and its related characters are the property of Pixar and Disney. No commercial claim is made herein to any such characters. This presentation is solely for editorial and educational purposes. It is in no way owned or approved by the Walt Disney Company, or any organization owned or operated by the Walt Disney Company and its business units. Copywrite, Ink. and UNLV are not affiliated with Pixar or Disney. Writing For Public Relations Richard Becker, Copywrite, Ink. at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

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