Wireless Industrial Applications

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Year after year, updates in industrial wireless technologies are among most popular Control Engineering articles and Webcasts. Experts will provide expert assessments of industrial wireless projects and lessons learned. An exam and certificate are available for one professional development hour (PDH), according to Registered Continuing Education Program rules (from the American Council of Engineering Companies).

Visit www.controleng.com to view this as an "On Demand Webcast," download the slides, and to take the CEU Exam. One (1) RCEP / ACEC Certified Professional Development Hour (PDH) available.

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Wireless Industrial Applications

  1. 1. Wireless Industrial Applications Sponsored by:
  2. 2. Related information regarding the webcast: • Download slides: http://www.controleng.com/index.php?id=7279 • Take the CEU Exam: http://www.controleng.com/index.php?id=7285 • For more information on Advantech: http://www.advantech.com • For more information on Moxa: http://www.moxa.com • For more information on another Control Engineering webcast visit http://www.controleng.com/media-library/webcasts.html
  3. 3. RCEP standards Control Engineering has met the standards and requirements of the Registered Continuing Education Program. Credit earned on completion of this program will be reported to RCEP at RCEP.net. A certificate of completion will be issued to each participant. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by RCEP.
  4. 4. Purpose and learning objectives • Overview of industrial wireless technologies (ISA100, HART Wireless, WiFi, WiMax), including economics and how to develop a new engineering mindset • Engineering decision criteria, including essential requirements and desired requirements • Need for a long-term wireless strategy • Specifications downfalls when evaluating radio aspects • Rapid prototyping of wireless sensors in an industrial environment • Define best practices to RF design in complex/harsh RF (radio frequency) environments, such as manufacturing/ industrial/ power generation facilities • Review real examples of wireless sensor deployments in industrial environments for workforce efficiency and condition- based monitoring.
  5. 5. Speakers Moderator: Mark T. Hoske, Content Manager, Control Engineering, CFE Media, covering industrial wireless and, among other topics, since 1994. Stephen Muenstermann, RoviSys Building Technologies, DC market manager - Lead wireless field solutions for a major automation company for North America and the global interface for all industrial wireless infrastructure. - More than 10 years of experience in industrial applications, radio frequency and communications military intelligence, industrial instrumentation and commercial wireless - Conducted more than 300 seminars on industrial wireless technology. Damon Brady, section manager, SAIC Energy, Environment & Infrastructure More than 15 years of technical and managerial experience in network communications and critical infrastructure services, with 10 years leading network design, implementation, and integration processes for utility, energy, public safety, and Smart Grid clients. Douglas Bowers, senior project manager, SAIC Energy, Environment & Infrastructure More than 15 years of experience in system integration for communication and network systems, identifying requirements, writing specifications, design, testing, and delivery, including rapid prototyping and development of sensor systems for industrial environments.
  6. 6. RF & Wireless Technology Simplifying the Beast! By: Stephen Muenstermann, RoviSys
  7. 7. Objectives Learning objectives are to understand: • Overview of industrial wireless technology, including economics and how to develop a new engineering mindset • ISA-100, HART Wireless, WiFi, WiMax, proprietary • Engineering decision criteria, including essential requirements and desired requirements • Need for a long-term wireless strategy • Specifications and downfalls when evaluating radio aspects of the technology
  8. 8. What do we know? • Wireless will happen (or has happened) at your facility! • Wireless creates some level of fear • We can access a wealth of information today through wireless • There is power in using wireless • It is not an engineering norm to use wireless in an industrial environment • Not in typical FEL practice FEL = front end loading
  9. 9. Today • The cloud has created forced adoption; it cannot be ignored. – Scalability – Design and set-up immediately – Proof of concept with minimal infrastructure cost – Plant floor security is rock solid – Great economic advantage – Huge savings a reality • Brownfield apps carry biggest gains • Regulatory wins huge • Inventory management • LDAR • SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition)
  10. 10. Whose standard is best? • 802.11 a, b, g, and n • 802.15.4 (ZigBee®) • ISA® 100.11a • HART Wireless • 802.16 (WiMax®) • Proprietary • Coexistence? ZigBee is a registered trademark of Zigbee Alliance in the U.S. and/or other countries. ISA is a registered trademark of the International Society of Automation in the U.S. and/or other countries. WiMax is a registered trademark of WiMax Forum in the U.S. and/or other countries.
  11. 11. Evaluation criteria • Do wireless! But, have a strategy. • DIY? (Do it yourself?) – Things to consider – Shortcuts can cost – Vendor claims will hurt • Outsource? – Evaluation process – Background – RF or IT – Big difference • Success in connectivity can only derive if RF works RF = radio frequency IT = information technology
  12. 12. Evaluation criteria • Do wireless! But, have a strategy. • Building a managed radio frequency (RF) network – How would you do wired? • Control your cloud • Wireless FEED (front-end engineering design) • Build for scalability • Integration is easy – Learn RF’s simple tribulations
  13. 13. Need for strategy Sensor network ISA®, HART and proprietary Handheld HMI/remote worker SCADA/HMI/BMS/EPMS Security/regulatory Safety HMI = BMS = EPMS = ISA is a registered trademark of the International Society of Automation in the U.S. and/or other countries.
  14. 14. Other reasoning strategy planning • Don’t leave design to ad-hoc measures • Current security issues likely exist – Business-level over plant floor • Managing RF/noise environment • RF and antenna management • Appoint a wireless manager lead/leader RF = radio frequency
  15. 15. Specifications and shortfalls simple observations to learn • Communication – antenna and RF • Near field and robbing BW • Hops – rings and understanding mesh • Organized process – Is it self-healing? • Spectrum analysis tools • Coexistence with everything and noise floor • Simple security/HR problems • LOS – line of site – true meaning • ISA® symbols to live by: RF = radio frequency HR = Human Resources BW = ISA is a registered trademark of the International Society of Automation in the U.S. and/or other countries.
  16. 16. Communication – antenna and RF D Near field RF = radio frequency
  17. 17. Directional = greater distance Yagi and parabolic typical Communication – antenna and RF D RF = radio frequency
  18. 18. Problems: • Antenna signal warping due to metal proximity • All antennas at same frequency mounted at same level • Crowding near field, which means receiver sensitivity breaks down, data loss/overlap Near field and coexistence potential mounting issues
  19. 19. Near field and coexistence potential mounting issues Problems: • Busy tower • Antennas are properly staggered • Directional antennas aimed to not cross paths
  20. 20. Rings of mesh! CR 1 2 3 4 5 Every hop results in a 50% drop in packet delivery. Mesh design strength is only as solid as its design. Beware of the vendor that says, “Just throw in another repeater.” You may get the data, but with what issues? Within your four rings, it is possible to have hundreds of sensors, depending on architecture.
  21. 21. Mesh has different meanings • Not all mesh networks are self-healing – Does it require a master controller? – Can the nodes/routers act as gateways? – How many routes will it list internally? – Does it require integration to organize mesh? • Is the mesh only radio sets or sensors? • Can end-points mesh? • Where does redundancy end? – Any single point of failure?
  22. 22. Spectrum analysis tools 900 MHz 2.4GHz/5GHz ISM bandsWall Attenuating source ISM = industrial, scientific, and medical
  23. 23. Coexistence-noise floor • Every transmitter adds to the noise floor • Most industrial wireless networks will coexist • Microwave ovens, CCTV, other; proximity is key CCTV = closed- circuit television
  24. 24. Security – HR issues Real security • Authentication • Encryption • Deterministic • FHSS • Anti-collision • Notification Attacks • Extremely expensive • Highly sophisticated • No real impact if successful Real insecurity - easy Chain-link fence tossed into substation FHSS = frequency hopping spread spectrum
  25. 25. LOS/Fresnel zone LOS = line of sight
  26. 26. Spectrum analysis/Line of RF site 900 MHz 2.4 GHz/5 GHz ISM bands Wall Attenuating sourceISM = industrial, scientific, and medical
  27. 27. Summary of objectives • Overview of industrial wireless technology, including economics and how to develop a new engineering mindset • ISA-100, HART Wireless, WiFi, WiMax, proprietary • Engineering decision criteria, including essential requirements and desired requirements • Need for a long-term wireless strategy • Specifications and downfalls when evaluating radio aspects of the technology
  28. 28. Wireless Monitoring, Sensing By: Damon Brady, SAIC Douglas Bowers, SAIC
  29. 29. Objectives • Educate viewer on rapid prototyping of wireless sensors in an industrial environment. • Define best practices to radio frequency (RF) design in complex/harsh RF environments such as manufacturing/industrial/power generation facilities. • Review real examples of wireless sensor deployments in industrial environments for workforce efficiency and condition-based monitoring.
  30. 30. • Enterprise cyber security assessments, design, and remediation • Critical infrastructure IT network design and build (IP voice and data, fiber/copper cable plant) • Wireless networking • Control systems hands-on experience • Infrastructure design, implementation and operations Wireless and mobility – field and plant (IT) services • Real-time data and predictive analytics • Comprehensive technology support • Location-based services for people and assets • Asset management and optimization • Application support (work management, asset management, scheduling) 32 IP = Internet Protocol
  31. 31. Wireless and mobility –Wireless design practice Business challenge: To design wireless connectivity for multiple domestic nuclear power plants. Including power block and turbine facilities (radioactive areas). Approach • Senior-level engineering teams with proper credentialing for passive and active surveys to each location • Develop advanced computer-based modeling of each facility in order to develop highly accurate radio frequency (RF) model and drive final design and bill of materials • Retain RF engineers for installation process oversight • Perform commissioning, testing and validation Results • This approach will deliver highly accurate designs, reducing materials costs and need for design modification after installation, • Allows for delivery of new, advanced applications into all areas of facility, increasing safely and efficiency • Lower dose for install crews (less time in radioactive environments). It gets done faster … 33
  32. 32. Wireless infrastructure deployment Design development process • Discovery activity • Requirements verification • Engineering analysis (RF allowability, etc.) • Analysis of drawings • Site walkdown (challenge briefings, etc.) • Onsite wireless surveys • Passive survey: RF data collection, spectrum analysis, building composition analysis, outdoor features/topology noted. Deliverable: preliminary design • Active survey: Validation exercise for our preliminary AP placements. Measure actual signal performance. Deliverable: final design • Wireless modeling and network design • Final bill of materials (equipment specifications and unit counts) • Design team: • Range of skills (systems/RF/network engineering) 34 RF = radio frequency AP = Access Point
  33. 33. 35 The critical infrastructure problem • Critical infrastructures have unique monitoring needs that are not being met. – Old: expensive to instrument, monitor and maintain – accidents happen – New: generate an unmanageable “firehose” of uncorrelated data • Compliance requirements are reactionary and constantly evolving • The market is flooded with fragmented point solution offerings • Industry lacks a “systems approach” solution to the market • Results from failure to monitor and act – Accidents – Shutdowns – Cyberattack These are not perceived problems – they are happening today and are a matter of national and international importance.
  34. 34. • Problem – legacy, aging equipment may be “un-instrumented,” and data acquisition on performance and maintenance may be natively impossible. Being able to retrofit adhoc instrumentation and communicate to gather data and metrics would allow better operational monitoring and maintenance planning and reduce downtime • Solution – technology and approach – development of ad-hoc (off- the-shelf) modules for sensor types (humid, temperature, vibration, pressure, magnetic) to allow rapid deployment of communicating sensors to gather data • Advantages, benefits and efficiencies – allows ad-hoc, short-term, or emergency surveillance of problem devices. Allows a modular approach to wireless sensor measurement in an aging plant environment without large-scale digital equipment upgrades Ad-hoc instrumentation and metering The availability of a pervasive wireless network within the plant allows the deployment of extremely low-cost sensors and meters for tactical or short-term operational needs. A „ ”bug-like” approach for the deployment of multi-sensor devices, specific for operation‟s needs is used. For example, suspect faulty motor or pump gets a camera, vibration sensor, Hall-effect monitor attached to the housing. In the new world, the sensor takes three minutes to assemble the modules in the “plant shop,” and one minute to provision on the network.
  35. 35. • Wireless acts as a common enabling technology • How Provides ubiquitous communications capabilities Cross-operational value and utility Common IP access using standards with robust cybersecurity Reduces lead-time and costs associated with wired cabling Wireless plant communications Provides the communications foundation to address many of the challenges of facility process transformation
  36. 36. Innovation areas of focus • Goal: Develop innovative technology solutions to achieve strategic goals. • Guiding principles – Enabling – Modular – Scalable and replicable – Standards-based … generally – Financially viable • Focus areas – Operations/workflow efficiency – Radiation protection and safety – Regulatory compliance
  37. 37. Critical infrastructure integrity monitoring reference architecture P2P/PMP = Point to Point/Point to Multipoint ULP = Ultra Link Processing XML = Extensible Markup Language S/A = Situational Awareness MOM = Manager of Managers PCN = Process Control Network ERP is enterprise resource planning software ® ERP Connecting software
  38. 38. Emergency planning zone radiation monitoring • Key business drivers – Support real-time emergency decision making – Extend emergency planning zone (EPZ) monitoring area to 50 miles – Provide low-cost situational awareness • Innovative approach – Developed long-life battery-powered sensors – Benefit from unique RF communications technology – Deliver data via SQL plus XML stream – XML standard equals reduced software integration to PDS • Return on investment targets – Reduce regulatory compliance costs – Increase planning accuracy – resource targeting – Low-cost insurance and customer service benefit • Status – Pilot phase successful, very strong business case identified – Have been asked to field a complete system at second facility PDS = Plant Display Software SQL = Search and Query Language XML = Extensible Markup Language
  39. 39. Wireless micro vibrational sensor • Key business drivers – Preventive/predictive maintenance of critical components through • Vibration analysis • Condition monitoring • Machine health • Independent monitoring and diagnostics • Safety shutoff sensing • Innovative approach – Enable independent data capture outside of traditional SCADA systems – Significantly reduce cost to allow monitoring of a larger sample of components – Leverage ORW to reduce overall infrastructure costs • Battery life, form factor, etc. • Reduce number of access points (APs), network infrastructure • Significantly increase number of sensor sets able to communicate across unlicensed bandwidth • Return on investment targets – Enable dose optimization, achieve/exceed ALARA targets – Reduced worker time in plant through automation of equipment monitoring function – Shift from predictive to condition-based maintenance ORW = On ramp wireless ALARA = As low as reasonably achievable (radiation exposure levels)
  40. 40. Today’s Webcast Sponsors
  41. 41. Question and answer session Ask a panelist a question by entering your question in the “Question & Answer” box and clicking submit. Mark T. Hoske, webcast moderator, content manager, Control Engineering Stephen Muenstermann, RoviSys Building Technologies, DC market manager www.rovisysbt.com Damon Brady, section manager, SAIC Douglas Bowers, senior project manager, SAIC www.saic.com/EEandI
  42. 42. Wireless Industrial Applications Sponsored by:

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