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The Reality of Re-Entry

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The Reality of Re-Entry

  1. 1. The Reality Of Re-Entry Challenges of Prisoner Re-Entry Societal Connections What Reform Has Been Done or Is in the Works? Medical and Behavioral Health Issues Livelihood Family The U.S. confines 25% of the world’s incarcerated population, despite having only 5% of its total population An average of 590,400 inmates have been released from federal and state prisons annually since 1990 More than 95% of today’s prison population will be released at some point The unemployment rate among formerly incarcerated people exceeds 27% Of the more than 50,000 people released from federal prisons in 2010, 33% found no employment over four years post-release A survey found only 12.5% of employers said they would accept an application from an ex-convict 51% of re-entries relied on their families to a much greater extent than expected Formerly incarcerated people see a homelessness or housing insecurity rate of 5,700 per 100,000-plus Individuals who have been incarcerated more than once experience homelessness at a rate 13 times higher than the public Full implementation of the Second Chance Act of 2007, which supports U.S. criminal justice system reform Additional support for research on pre- and post-re-entry services and programming Re-evaluation and further investment for re-entry programming with provisions made for enhanced care coordination and care management Expansion and enforcement of anti-discrimination rules and regulations Funding increase for subsidized employment programs and American Job Centers Due to pre-existing conditions and the negative effect of incarceration, those released from incarceration have a high risk for adverse health outcomes and death 15-20% of incarcerated men suffer from emotional disorders When compared to the general population, suicide risk was 62% higher among previously incarcerated individuals More than half of incarcerated adults are parents of minor children Prisoners have a lower recidivism rate if they maintain consistent contact and connection with their families Programs to improve parenting skills have been found to be effective and beneficial, yet participation has declined in recent years www.brookings.edu/research/a-better-path-forward-for-criminal-justice-changing-prisons-to-help-people-change/ www.brookings.edu/research/a-better-path-forward-for-criminal-justice-prisoner-reentry/ www.deseret.com/utah/2022/1/6/22868683/hatch-foundation-family-centered-reforms-can-reduce-recidivism- intergenerational-incarceration www.healthaffairs.org/do/10.1377/hpb20210928.343531/ prisonerresource.com/prison-consulting-services/prisoner-reentry-programs/ online.simmons.edu/blog/prisoner-reentry/ iop.harvard.edu/sites/default/files/sources/program/IOP_Policy_Program_2019_Reentry_Policy.pdf

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