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SCORECARD 2015: National Conference on Business of Sports Newsletter Sept-Oct 2015

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CII’s SCORECARD 2015 was a major initiative
to create a roadmap for India to tap tremendous
business opportunities the sector has to offer. It not
only brought all industry stakeholders under one roof
to deliberate and decide on the course of action, but
also offered a unique opportunity to understand the
challenges that are impeding the sector’s growth.

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SCORECARD 2015: National Conference on Business of Sports Newsletter Sept-Oct 2015

  1. 1. 1Newsletter from the CII Sports Division World No. 1 Indian badminton player Saina Nehwal addressing the audience through video CII’s SCORECARD 2015 was a major initiative to create a roadmap for India to tap tremendous business opportunities the sector has to offer. It not only brought all industry stakeholders under one roof to deliberate and decide on the course of action, but also offered a unique opportunity to understand the challenges that are impeding the sector’s growth L-R: Mr Sanjay Gupta, Chairman, CII National Committee on Sports, former tennis star Mr Vijay Amritraj, Mr Onkar Kedia, Joint Secretary-Sports, Ministry of Youth Affairs & Sports and Mr Chandrajit Banerjee, DG, CII Mr Rajiv Yadav, newly-appointed Secretary Sports, Ministry of Youth Affairs & Sports The Subroto Cup Trophy being unveiled at the inaugural session by Air Marshal B B P Sinha L-R: Tennis star Ms Ashwini Ponnappa, Mr Viren Rasquinha, CEO, Olympic Gold Quest, Mr Ajay Maken, President, Delhi Pradesh Congress Committee, Mr Rahul Kanwal, Managing Editor, India Today Group, Sports Lawyer and Activist Mr Rahul Mehra, Indian Shooter Major Vijay Kumar and Indian Archer Mr Rahul Banerjee Mr Chandrajit Banerjee, DG, CII in conversation with Mr Sanjay Gupta, Chairman, CII National Committee on Sports and Chief Operating Office, Star India Pvt ltd Business leaders, sports professionals and other stakeholders of the sports industry gathered in hundreds at CII’s SCORECARD 2015 in New Delhi on September 1 to deliberate on ways to take the industry forward Newsletter from the CII Sports Division SCORECARD 2015National Conference on Business of Sports september 2015 Discussion on multi sports (other than cricket) and the empowerment of women in sports were the major headline points at the CII’s Scorecard 2015
  2. 2. 2 Newsletter from the CII Sports Division TAKEAWAYS FROM SCORECARD 2015 NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON BUSINESS OF SPORTS SPORTS A SERIOUS BUSINESS When it comes to sports, the need is to capture the imagination of people, especially women, and push them into sports. This was stated by Mr Rajiv Yadav, newly appointed Sports Secretary, Ministry of Youth Affairs & Sports, Government of India, while addressing “Scorecard 2015 -- National Conference on Business of Sports”, organized by Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) in association with Ministry of Youth Affairs & Sports, on Sep- tember 1, 2015, at New Delhi. Mr Yadav added sports was a serious business but a happy one too and that the idea was to focus and identify key areas of investment. On a motivational note, one person’s win in any sport was a mat- ter of rejoice for all and gives everyone psychological boost. “Invest in proud Indians,” Mr Yadav said in his address. Chandrajit Banerjee Director General, CII Focus on Sports, says DG CII CII is focused on presenting sports as a significant sector for the industry to focus, collaborate and invest on, said Mr Chandrajit Banerjee, Director General, CII, in his address at SCORECARD 2015 held in New Delhi on September 1. He called for collaboration between gov- ernment and private sector to strengthen the sport industry. “The global sports industry is estimated to be worth around 600 billion dollar comprising a range of associated businesses such as sports manufacturing, retail, sports medicine, venues & infrastructure. Hence, it is criti- cally important for us to make rapid strides in all these areas of sports,” he said. He lauded the effort of bringing “the world of sports under one roof”, as he called SCORECARD 2015 “one giant step” in the right direction. A vibrant sporting culture, implementation of a uniform sports policy across the na- tion, increased transparency and profes- sionalism in the system, coupled with growing awareness among all stakehold- ers by encouraging PPP models, nurturing talent and training-the-trainers can result in the creation of a better evolved sports ecosystem of a country, he observed. Mr Banerjee also stressed on India’s urgent need of a roadmap for development of sports, particularly the Private-Public Partnership Model practiced successfully in several parts of the world. Immense power in sports Can improve communication between countries Can build character, instil positivity Corporate mindset towards sports needs to be changed Can create large number of jobs Need to take sports to the next generation Sports revolution underway in India Need for more funding and corporate participation in sportsSchools should be partners in promoting Give due recogni- tion, appreciation to sportspersons Sports a multi billion industry in world Mr Rajiv Yadav Sports Secretary, Ministry of Youth Affairs & Sports, Government of India
  3. 3. 3Newsletter from the CII Sports Division A Call for Financial Security of Sportspersons India needs more financial inputs in sports, which is only one of the permissible activities for CSR funding. We need to create more funds for sports and make it more than a leisure activity I naugurating the National Confer- ence on Business of Sports, Mr Onkar Kedia, Joint Secretary-Sports, Ministry of Youth Affairs & Sports, called for financial security for sportspersons, calling it as one of the necessary conditions to push people into sports. “However, we also need to appreciate them, give them recognition, and convert them into icons and role models so that they believe that sports are a worthwhile effort.” While he expressed happiness at the rate funds were flowing into sports, Mr Kedia said that more financial inputs were required, especially in non-cricket sports, to push sports further. “Sports is only one of the permissible activi- ties for CSR funding. We need to create more funds for sports and make it more than a leisure activity,” he added. Mr Sanjay Gupta, Chairman, CII National Committee on Sports and COO, Star India Pvt. Ltd., said India was on a threshold of change especially in sectors such as tech- nology, healthcare and telecom. However, one of the sectors which has got more attention than them has been the sports sector. “While it was associated with under- excellence earlier, it is now going global. People are taking up sports with enthusi- asm not seen before. The whole language of sports is changing.” Outlining the decided shift seen in India’s engagement with sports, Mr Gupta said sports were creating phenomenal money and this was evident in the last ISL auction where 10 players went for Rs 40 lakh each, which was more than what top MBAs seek to earn in the country. He further spoke of enthusiasm seen towards sports, aided by the digital media and the private sector. “People are becoming heroes in sports. With the initia- tion of the private sector, the push has been strengthened. We now have new leagues starting every month backed by serious business plans, investment venture capital- ists, bankers and film-makers.” Mr Gupta said a sports revolution was underway in India at present and the sports scene had changed dramatically. “The sports’ growth story has been unanticipated in India. Sports is a 2 billion dollar enterprise in India, as big as the film industry.” The need of the hour, he added, was to push young people into sports and make them a part of the success story of sports. Mr Gupta said one way this could be achieved was by throwing school playgrounds open to children to give them access to play- grounds. “This lack of having a place to play has wiped interest in sports and by giving their playgrounds to children to play in eve- ning and holidays, schools could contribute to the fairy tale growth stories in sports.” Mr Vijay Amritraj, former Tennis player and sports commentator, said India was only scratching the tip of the iceberg in terms of sports currently. In an inspirational speech, Mr Amritraj said there were 30 million In- dians living overseas who want to support India’s growth story especially in terms of sports. “The greatest strength of sports is merit. The question of excellence is critical to sports. However, we need to create a culture of sports and more than that, we need to look after every athlete who has represented the country.” Seeking young people to enter into sports from a young age, Mr Amritraj said that a good athlete will always get into a good school, a good college and will have a good education for the lifetime. “Sports is the world’s greatest gamble. When we are abroad, the playing field is different and the pursuit of excellence changes. The rewards and the feeling of being in a sport and of representing a country are unimaginable but it also brings responsibility.” Mr Onkar Kedia, Joint Secretary-Sports, Ministry of Youth Affairs & Sports Sports is only one of the permissible activi- ties for CSR funding. We need to create more funds for sports and make it more than a leisure activity Mr Chandrajeet Banerjee, DG, CII, welcomes former tennis star Mr Vijay Amritraj at the inaugural session. Also seen are Mr Onkar Kedia, Joint Secretary-Sports, Ministry of Youth Affairs & Sports and Mr Sanjay Gupta, Chairman, CII National Committee on Sports
  4. 4. 4 Newsletter from the CII Sports Division In Pursuit of excellence: The Power of Sports Sports touches various aspects of our lives and our relationship with it is deep and strong. A win or a loss can be interpreted in more than one ways and possesses the power to change our destiny. The pursuit of excellence in sports is constant and helps us evolve as better human beings, say experts M r Pankaj Advani, Indian Billiards Player, said while great things have been achieved in Indian sports, more promotion of sports needs to be done. He advocated sports being made a part of the curriculum and the government fram- ing policies which would treat all sports equally. “We need to draw inspiration from other countries in the world on how they treat sports as a discipline and also their sportspersons. But we also need to create world beaters in India and instil fear in the mind of our opponents. We need to plug both ends.” He said sports has immense power and everything about it was positive. There- fore, to achieve more, he opined that the government and the corporate sector could come together, i.e. a company could adopt one sport and the government, in turn, could give tax benefits to the company. National Skills Development Corporation Chairman Mr Dilip Chenoy said sports has been included as a discipline as part of the skill development programme. “Sports can be a huge sector. It can create jobs, change manufacturing sector and create the econo- my in the way that did not exist till now.” He said that in order to promote sports, the need was to create jobs in terms of coach- es, trainers, medicine experts, nutritionists, strength experts and psychologists. He lamented the fact that these kind of jobs did not exist in India were but required by every school, college and state. “People believe that sports is the business of gov- ernment and not business of business. We need to change that. Private sector does not offer jobs to former sportsperson but we have to revert the mindset of corporates as well parents. We have to change the way we believe about sports.” Responding to this, Mr Charu Sharma said, “The response to sports is phenomenal. The allure of sports itself is phenomenal. But we are not able to catch up with the in- terest level of people in sports. The need is to harness it.” He said that corporate India was showing more interest in sports and thus what was required was more conver- sations in sports. Mr Vijay Amritraj said, “There are variety of ways to look at sports. Winning for the country is one of them. The power of sports is such that it can lead to better commu- nication between countries and mend ties. We need to take sports to the next genera- tion with the help of funds, sponsorships and the media.” He said everyone who wanted to take up sports required the 4 Ds to be able to achieve what they wanted. These were desire, determination, discipline and dedication. The session ‘In Pursuit: The Power of Sports’ in progress at CII’s SCORECARD 2015 in New Delhi on September 1. The allure of sports itself is phenomenal. But we are not able to catch up with the interest level of people in sports. The need is to harness it
  5. 5. 5Newsletter from the CII Sports Division One Can Think of A Career in Football in India Today Sports is no longer about odd players. Economic opportunity is there and parents should give a push to children to play I n a session on Making football a way of life in India, Moderator Mr Sukh- vinder Singh, MD, Libero Sports, said everyone was debating and is interested in Indian sports but infrastructure lacks in the country and players need to be brought together to play. Mr Kushal Das, Secretary General, All India Football Federation, which manages and develops football in the country, said there has been a significant mindset change in developing football at the grassroots level. He said participants were being competitively trained for the U-17 world cup and they were being trained to take football as a way of life. The U17 team is in Germany playing and prepar- ing for the world cup and doing very well. Creating or engaging youth to football, the AIFF has started Mission 11 Million which is a mission to engage youth in various as- pects of football. The U17 world cup will be used as a platform to launch this Mission. India also wants to launch its own League and develop football but the situation has improved considerably in last two years. “19 clubs at top level, 8 ISL clubs, 11 clubs in the IG, which is a great situation as far as Indian football was concerned,” he added. Mr Arup Das, Managing Trustee, India Youth Soccer Association, gave a detailed presentation of the work the non-profit organization was doing. Disadvantaged children from north and north east India are given opportunities to play. These are those children who cannot afford to pay fee, are brought under the organization through special programmes. These children are tapped young and are made to undergo training to give them experience. They are also exposed to training of coaches from Arsenal, one of the biggest clubs in UK to make football a way of life for them. Players associated with the organization are also selected by top clubs in country to further their interest in the sport. Mr Nitin Kukreja, while answering how world drives the football culture, said at Star Sports, football was marketed aggressively. “Access is provided to millions of people who can consume football actively. Football’s problem was access which we have done away with.” He said that in other countries, children play football actively and in foot- ball-playing countries, children start playing at school-level and groomed by the system to be taken to professional level. “Today, one has a career in sports. It is no longer about odd players. Economic opportunity is there and parents should give a push to children to play. What we need to sort is problem of access, so schools and government should create infrastructure.” General Secretary, Confederation of African Football, Hicham El Amrani, said in ten years time, revolution will come in sports in India. “Football needs to be looked as sports, business and a social phenomenon that belongs to people, he said. In Africa, it has been included in the culture of the people.” Hicham said that in order to make it as way of life, perception of football needs to be changed. “A national develop- ment plan needs to be put into place that would create synergies around football. It should also be linked to health and educa- tion, included in curriculum. Infrastructure is another thing, besides media which can telecast football to raise the value of the sport. Football doesn’t have to compete with cricket but be with cricket in India be- cause of its popularity,” he said. Rahul Patil, CEO, North East United FC, said the idea was to create consistent under level teams which could perform internationally. The session Making Football a way of life in India at CII’s SCORECARD 2015
  6. 6. 6 Newsletter from the CII Sports Division Sponsorship is All About Deeper Connection Sports in India need longer association with brands to gain competi- tive advantage in the world. This can be achieved by creating more number of success stories and a mindset that is able to see beyond ROI numbers “Are Indian brands investing money in sports, in some cases yes and in some cases no. Not more than 20-30 brands today are investing consistently in the business of sports in India,” said Mr Vinit Karnik, Nation- al Director Sports and Live Events, GroupM, as he gave the data on the brands investing in the business of sports in India. On how to attract brands to put money in a sporting event, Mr Anil Singh, Managing Di- rector Procam International said: “Sponsor- ship is like being involved in a family. Spon- sors need to know who they are working with, what objectives they want to achieve and the reason they are there. “ For a long term sponsorship relationship, the brands are not being involved. Sports sells on stories, he added. The healthiest thing to do in most parts of the world, the sponsors spend 1 plus 2. But in India to get 1 plus .2 is sometimes a chal- lenge. For promoters the passion is impor- tant and for brands it’s sometimes leap of faith, Mr Singh said. On the learnings other sports can pick up from IPL’s success, Mr Sundar Raman, COO, Indian Premier League, said that it was not an easy journey for cricket either. The remarkable shift came when Reliance put a substantial amount of investment into the 1987 World Cup that’s the extent of commit- ment we need. He said that sport like football demand deeper connection with fans. “Sport is a commitment, which is far exceed- ing the short term horizon and I think that is what cricket has been able to achieve in India,” Mr Raman said. Mr Dave Thomas, Managing Director, Adidas Group – India, speaking on how global brands are able to invest in one property, said that brands like Adidas look for value. “It’s also commercial returns,” he added. Mr Sumanta Datta, Vice President, Coca Cola – India, said there are two types of brand associations – building brand value and building business model. He gave the example of Coca Cola’s long-term associa- tion with China’s football team to deepen the relationship. There is no fixed answer if somebody asks what is the ROI on FIFA World Cup, he added. Mr Fraser Castellino, CEO, Kings XI Punjab, said, that the mindset that what is the ROI on sporting events still exists and the trick is to build faith with brands so that they repeat. For the last two years the IPL team has invested in digital space, he added. The session ‘Role of Sports in Creating Powerful Brands’ at CII’s SCORECARD 2015 in New Delhi on September 1 There is no fixed answer if somebody asks what is the ROI on FIFA World Cup
  7. 7. 7Newsletter from the CII Sports Division India Needs Better Focus to Perform at Olympics India’s tally of medals at Olympics is comparable to smaller coun- tries like Morocco. But how to improve it? M r Rahul Kanwal, Managing Editor, India Today Group, while open- ing the session on ‘What stands between us and Olympic Gold Medal, said that India’s tally of medals at Olympics is comparable to smaller countries like Morocco as he asked the panellists the reasons on the dismal performance of India in Olympics and where the country is expected to stand in Rio Olympics. Mr Viren Rasquinha, CEO, Olympic Gold Quest, said that very small proportion of the population has access to good sporting facility and “that’s where the problem lies”. But he added that we must not be cynical about not having an adequate infrastruc- ture. “We need much better focus,” he said. He added that the quality of coaches across the country must be improved. “We cannot continue to rely on foreign coaches.” On how the badminton has changed in In- dia, Indian badminton player Ms Ashwini Ponnappa said that events like Common- wealth Games in 2010 changed the face of not only badminton but other sports as well. “A lot of funding was pumped into sports and that helped a lot. Along with funding came a lot of exposure which we continue to get.” Mr Ajay Maken, President, Pradesh Con- gress Committee, who was the Sports Min- ister of India in the previous government, said that the way sports is administered in India is “stopping us” to win medals in Olympics. “The politicians should not be al- lowed to run sports bodies. We need much better sports administrators – people who have the knowledge of sports should be made administrators.” He also suggested that physical fitness of youngsters in the country was also impor- tant to perform well in sporting events like Olympics. He came up with some interest- ing findings of a study in Kerala. “In Kerala, the government conducted a study in 2010-11 related to physical fitness of school children. More than 15,00,000 students from Class 5 to 10 across 4,583 schools in the state were part of the test and out of total boys only 17.8 percent were found to be physically fit and only 13.23 percent girls were found to be physically fit.” Mr Rahul Mehra, Sports Lawyer and Activ- ist said that soon the APP government will come up with a policy on sports that will allow people to have access to sporting facilities like playgrounds of private schools in the capital. The session `What stands between us and Olympic medals’ at CII’s SCORECARD 2015 Delhi Government will come up with a policy on sports that will allow people to have access to sporting facilities like playgrounds of private schools in the capital
  8. 8. 8 Newsletter from the CII Sports Division Empowering Women Through Sports Women sporting events present more opportunities for India to im- prove its world rankings O bserving that not any people in India would choose football, Ms Anjum Chopra asked Ms Rose Thomson, Education Director of Yuwa India as to why football has been chosen by her NGO to empower women, to which, Ms Thomson said “that’s what the girls wanted.” She said that rural Jharkhand where the NGO operates is a difficult place to grow up for girls and that Yuwa India is to open a football academy for them to put “the future of girls in their own hands and we found that football is really a powerful way to achieve this”. Ms Thomson said the sports gives women a powerful structure to connect with each other and form a community. Ms Amel Maaouia, Consultant and Practitio- ner on Leadership and Advocacy, pointed out the barriers for women in sports. She said the barriers are connected to the perception, beliefs and social interpretations. “The other barriers are poverty or economic means and also access to safe and secure sports infrastructure.” Also, there is little awareness about the benefits of sports, she added. Other challenges as pointed out by Mr Kalyan Chaubey, Former Goalkeeper of the Indian Football team, include lack of financial secu- rity for sportspersons. Ms Aditi Chauhan, Goalkeeper of the India’s Women Football team, said women often find themselves asking questions that whether they have taken the right decision to have chosen sports as a career. She said it was im- portant to have people with positive attitude around you. Mr Siddhartha Upadhyay, Founder and Secretary General, Stair, women sporting events present more opportunities for India to improve its world rankings. The session `Women in Indian Sports: Transforming Sports for the benefit of Women’ at CII’s SCORECARD 2015 The sports gives women a powerful structure to connect with each other and form a community
  9. 9. 9Newsletter from the CII Sports Division T he sports sector in India is witnessing an explosive growth. There has been a sudden emergence of dramatic and persistent stories of global excellence and sports is now being considered a lucrative profession, said Mr Sanjay Gupta, Chairman, CII National Committee on Sports and, Chief Operating Officer, Star India Pvt. Ltd, in his theme address at SCORECARD 2015. “A sector that barely saw any movement in the last 100 years has suddenly been in- fused with energy, excitement and growth. A field in which we have been used to consis- tent mediocrity has suddenly seen the emer- gence of dramatic and persistent stories of global excellence,” Mr Gupta said while presenting an overview of unique opportuni- ties prevailing in the Indian sports sector. He said that an explosive, dramatic trans- formation in the field of sports is already in play. “When I step out of the house at 6am to catch a flight, I see men, women, even senior citizens taking to jogging tracks, exer- cising and training hard for a 40-KM run that happens once a year: the Marathon! I’m told there are 40-50,000 such people in Mumbai city alone,” he observed. He expressed confidence in the sector’s growth. “In a country where there has been no concept of compulsory physical training or fitness or cultural yearning for sports, this is quite fascinating and almost unreal! These are regular people, not athletes; and they are go- ing through such grueling training not to win a medal or some form of competition – but just for the sheer love of being part of that race!” He said that people are exhibiting passion for sports which is driving sportspersons to chase excellence. “There are more than a dozen inspiring stories. One such story is that of a small-town girl from Hissar Harya- na, with very little avenues to play or pursue sports growing up. But today, her name rings loud when we think of inaugural – Making India a Sporting Nation,” he added. Mr Gupta noted that sports is now emerging as a lucrative profession in India. “On 10th of July, for the ISL auction, 10 players ended up with cheques of a minimum of 40 lakhs, and two of them earned more than a crore,” he said. “These are salaries bigger than what top- class MBAs of this country look to earn in India.” He said these were some signs indicating a shift in India’s engagement with sports. Exuding confidence in the prospects of the Indian sports sector, Mr Gupta said that de- spite some of the teething issues in sports, key factors driving sector’s growth were individual brilliance and support from private enterprise. “This change is happening despite all our corridor conversations on the creaking flaws in a dilapidated sports system: we hear of lack of facilities to play, dearth of world- class trainers and coaches, an education system that sidelines sports altogether and government expenditure on sports being at a paltry Rs. 1,500 crores,” he said. He said India is now emerging as a multi- sports nations. “Today, we have more than just cricketing heroes – there are celebrity sportspersons in boxing, shooting, snooker, wrestling, chess, golf, and most recently, kabaddi and football. In all those sports, we have more than one name that has managed to become a household name.” “In tennis, Sania and Leander are dominat- ing practically every other doubles tourna- ment; and in badminton, it’s not just Saina Nehwal, behind her is a battery of young players Ashwini Ponnappa, P V Sindhu and Kashyap.” Citing the success of Telecom Industry, he said that sports too is poised for exactly the same kind of logic-defying, disproportionate, organic and un-anticipated growth-story. According to him, sports industry, currently US$ 2 billion industry, possess potential to reach the level of US$ 10 billion in the next five years. “Sports is already a 2 billion dollar enter- prise. It may still not have been accorded industry status, but let me tell you, this is as big as the entire Indian Film industry put together. So, in effect, what 1,600+ films across Bollywood, Tollywood, Kollywood and all the rest of it generate in revenue terms.” He also pointed out challenges in terms of access to sporting facilities. Mr Gupta said that if we could cut down on rules around who can gain access to grounds in schools and other institutions, this alone could be the single biggest factor in unlocking the sporting potential of this country. Unlocking India’s Sports Potential Sanjay Gupta, Chairman, CII National Committee on Sports and, Chief Operating Officer, Star India Pvt. Ltd, in his inaugural address presented an overview of unique opportunities prevailing in the In- dian sports sector and ways in which this could transform the overall sporting landscape in the country Sanjay Gupta, Chairman, CII National Committee on Sports and, Chief Operating Officer, Star India Pvt. Ltd
  10. 10. 10 Newsletter from the CII Sports Division Silver Partnerner Football PartnerSports Development Partner Online Partner Media Partner Globally, sports is a $145 billion economy to which the media rights contributes around $35 bn. North America contributes$12 bn, EMA contributes about $13 bn and APEC contributes about $6 billion. In terms of the sponsorship pie, it’s about 15 bn in North America, 15 bn in EMA and about 12 billion in APEC. Amongst the APEC countries, only $1 bn is spent in India by various brands. This number can double or triple in the next 6 years. Mr Vinit Karnik National Director Sports and Live Events, GroupM The entry into sports in India from the commercial advertising, sponsorship structures is very very low cost in comparison to football in Europe. It is driven by the fact that people turn up every weekend in thousands to watch the game. Mr Sundar Raman COO, Indian Premier League If you look at the top 20 medal winners in the London Olympics, more than 80 percent of their medals were focusing on just four sports. Mr Viren Rasquinha CEO, Olympic Gold Quest AAP government in Delhi will soon introduce a new sports policy which will allow public access to the grounds of private schools in the capital. Mr Rahul Mehra Sports Lawyer and Activist In hockey, I am shocked to find that today’s 15 year old talented kids are being taught the same things that I was taught years ago while the game has progressed leaps and bounds. India needs the coach the coaches programme. Mr Viren Rasquinha CEO, Olympic Gold Quest You can have the best coaches, best facilities but if you do not have the exposure it is very difficult to compete at the top level. So, it is very important to have a consistent exposure. Ms Ashwini Ponnappa Indian Badminton Player We need age limitation for sports administrators. How can 80-85 years old person without any domain knowledge of sports can run a sport that too for decades all together. Mr Ajay Maken President, Pradesh Congress Committee VOICES

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