CM10 Value Mapping Doug Walker

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CM10 Value Mapping Doug Walker

  1. 1. VALUE MAPPING A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR CITIZEN-DRIVEN COMMUNITY PLANNING COMMUNITY MATTERS ’10 ♦ DOUG WALKER, PLACEWAYS with AMY ANDERSON 1
  2. 2. WELCOME!  Have a seat but don’t get too comfortable.  Please write your name on a tent.  On the inside of the tent, write the approximate population of the place you live. For example, “15,000.” 2
  3. 3. 3 City
 Region
 
Popula0on

 Ames
 IA
 













56,510

 Blandford
 MA
 















1,214

 Boulder
 CO
 











100,000

 Denver
 CO
 











610,000

 Driggs
 ID
 















1,100

 Durango
 CO
 













15,500

 Golden
 CO
 













17,159

 Great
Barrington
 MA
 















7,527

 Hayden
 CO
 















1,634

 Lancaster
 PA
 













55,350

 Lincoln
 MA
 















8,056

 Longmont
 CO
 













85,928

 Missoula
 MT
 













64,000

 New
Haven
 CT
 











123,000

 Newport
 VT
 















1,511

 Portland
 ME
 













62,875

 Queenstown
 MD
 



















617

 Rawlins
 WY
 















8,538

 Rochester
 NY
 











220,000

 Salt
Lake
City
 UT
 











183,000

 SeaWle
 WA
 











617,000

 St.
Paul
 MN
 











287,000

 Tucson
 AZ
 











549,000

 Vancouver
 BC
 











578,000

 Washington
 DC
 











600,000

 West
Palm
Beach
 FL
 













99,500


  4. 4. YOUR “TABLE COMMUNITY”  Population  Demographics, informal description of community makeup  Geographic setting  Physical form  Character, values, “heart and soul”  If it had a name, what would it be?  Do you allow medical marijuana dispensaries? 4
  5. 5. 5
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. 7
  8. 8. 8
  9. 9. 9
  10. 10. 10 Ray Janko: www.rayjanko.com
  11. 11. 11
  12. 12. 12
  13. 13. “We are gradually losing our community’s heart and soul.” “Community character is too subjective to legislate.” “Experts know better.” 13
  14. 14. PLANNING – NEW PERSPECTIVES 14
  15. 15. VALUE MAPPING  Take action in support of unique community character  Give voice to subjective considerations in planning  Quantify and describe relationships between physical form and community values  Promote constructive discussion about, and deeper exploration of community values 15
  16. 16. 16
  17. 17. 17 Today’s techniques developed primarily by the Orton Family Foundation
  18. 18. STEP 1: CORE VALUE Core Value Western Feel 18
  19. 19. “CORE VALUES” 19
  20. 20. STEP 2: VALUE ELEMENTS Core Value Western Feel Value Elements Historic Reminders Ranching 20
  21. 21. STEP 3: VALUE DRIVERS Core Value Western Feel Value Elements Historic Reminders Ranching Value Drivers Historic Buildings Ag Preserves “Hassles” 21
  22. 22. STEP 4: INDICATORS Core Value Western Feel Value Elements Value Drivers Historic Reminders Historic Buildings Ranching Ag Preserves “Hassles” Indicators Number Acres Covered Fences % Ranchers 22
  23. 23. RESULT: “VALUE TREE” Core Value Western Feel Value Elements Value Drivers Indicators Historic Reminders Historic Buildings Number Ranching Ag Preserves Acres Covered “Hassles” Fences % Ranchers 23
  24. 24. TWO QUESTIONS 1.  How do you figure this out? 2.  How do you use it? 24
  25. 25. Core Value Western Feel Value Elements Value Drivers Indicators Historic Reminders Historic Buildings Number Ranching Ag Preserves Acres Covered “Hassles” Fences % Ranchers BUILDING VALUE TREES VALUE CAPTURE (NOT COVERED HERE) 25
  26. 26. Core Value Western Feel Value Elements Value Drivers Indicators Historic Reminders Historic Buildings Number Ranching Ag Preserves Acres Covered “Hassles” Fences % Ranchers BUILDING VALUE TREES CHANGE-OVER-TIME POSTERS Based on the approach of Jim Ritchie-Dunham, Growing Edge Partners26
  27. 27. !me
 TODAY
 (2009)
 20
years
from
now
 (2029)
 20
years
ago
 (1989)
 Value:
 Western
Feel
 Ca+le
and
ranches
 Cowboy
hats
 Historic
buildings
 Mountain
views
 Houses
everywhere
 Non‐western
architecture
 Chain
stores
and
restaurants
 10
 9
 8
 7
 6
 5
 4
 3
 2
 1
 10
 9
 8
 7
 6
 5
 4
 3
 2
 1
 10
 9
 8
 7
 6
 5
 4
 3
 2
 1
 How
are
 things
 today?




 Step
2
 How
were
things
 20
years
ago?
 Step
3
 If
we
do
nothing
 differently,
where
are
 things
headed?
 Step
4
 10
 9
 8
 7
 6
 5
 4
 3
 2
 1
 Status
quo
 Desired
 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
 10
 How
important
is
this?
 How
important
is
this
 value
to
Durango?

Step
1
 How
would
we
like
 things
to
be?
 Step
5
 Less
important
 More
important
 Ways
this
value
shows
up
 in
Durango
 be+er
worse
 Factors
making
things
beLer
in
the
past:
 Factors
making
things
beLer
in
future:
 Factors
making
things
worse
in
the
past:
 Factors
making
things
worse
in
future:
 27

  28. 28. Agricultural preservation Families keeping ranches Saving historic barns near the road Ranching economy going down New housing developments along the highway Vacation homes/part-time residents Tall hotels that block the views Rising house prices down the valley mean more commuters moving here Ranching economy going down even more Closing the horse trail Hassles like fences and tractor roads Influx of new people? Western-style fairs and events Limits on building heights/design More local jobs so next generation doesn’t have to move away to find work Keep new housing close in; save the open spaces Influx of new people? Value:
 Western
Feel
 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
 10
 How
important
is
this?
 How
important
is
this
 value
to
Durango?

Step
1
 Less
important
 More
important
 Ca+le
and
ranches
 Cowboy
hats
 Historic
buildings
 Mountain
views
 Houses
everywhere
 Non‐western
architecture
 Chain
stores
and
restaurants
 Ways
this
value
shows
up
 in
Durango
 be+er
worse
 !me
 TODAY
 (2009)
 20
years
from
now
 (2029)
 20
years
ago
 (1989)
 10
 9
 8
 7
 6
 5
 4
 3
 2
 1
 10
 9
 8
 7
 6
 5
 4
 3
 2
 1
 10
 9
 8
 7
 6
 5
 4
 3
 2
 1
 10
 9
 8
 7
 6
 5
 4
 3
 2
 1
 Status
quo
 Desired
 How
are
 things
 today?




 Step
2
 How
were
things
 20
years
ago?
 Step
3
 If
we
do
nothing
 differently,
where
are
 things
headed?
 Step
4
 How
would
we
like
 things
to
be?
 Step
5
 Status quo Desir ed GA P Factors
making
things
beLer
in
the
past:
 Factors
making
things
beLer
in
future:
 Factors
making
things
worse
in
the
past:
 Factors
making
things
worse
in
future:
 28
 Driver sElements
  29. 29. Core Value Western Feel Value Elements Value Drivers Indicators Historic Reminders Historic Buildings Number Ranching Ag Preserves Acres Covered “Hassles” Fences % Ranchers BUILDING VALUE TREES CONVENTIONAL FLIP CHARTS 29
  30. 30. FLIP CHART EXERCISE Chart 1 Core Value Chart 2 Three Value Elements Chart 3a Value Drivers •  for one Value Element Chart 3b (optional) Value Drivers •  for another Value Element Chart 4a Indicators • for two or three value drivers from 3a Chart 4b (optional) Indicators • for two or three value drivers from 3b 30
  31. 31. Core Value Western Feel Value Elements Value Drivers Indicators Historic Reminders Historic Buildings Number Ranching Ag Preserves Acres Covered “Hassles” Fences % Ranchers BUILDING VALUE TREES CONVENTIONAL FLIP CHARTS 31 Chart 1 Chart 2 Chart 3 Chart 4
  32. 32. CHART 1: CORE VALUE  For this exercise, please use the following example. Think of it as the answer to the question, “In our community, what do we value most?”: • Family Friendliness 32
  33. 33. CHART 2: VALUE ELEMENTS In our town, valuing “Diversity…” means MOSTLY NOT SO MUCH Ages Income levels Ethnic backgrounds Education Politics How does the core value “show up” in this community? How is this value experienced in the community? When we say we value __________, what do we mean? 33
  34. 34. CHART 3: VALUE DRIVERS + - ELEMENT: Age Diversity No entry-level jobs Small yards What tangible characteristics of the community positively or negatively impact this value element? Good schools Night life Senior housing + - ELEMENT: Income Diversity No affordable housing Recreation amenities Service jobs 34
  35. 35. CHART 4: INDICATORS How can you tell if the driver is weak or strong? Consider both direct measurements and “proxy” measurements. DRIVER: Night life # restaurants/cafes/bars/theaters Walkability of entertainment district Young adult housing near entertainment Distance to competing centers 35
  36. 36. Core Value Western Feel Value Elements Value Drivers Indicators Historic Reminders Historic Buildings Number Ranching Ag Preserves Acres Covered “Hassles” Fences % Ranchers BUILDING VALUE TREES MIND MAPS 36
  37. 37. Value Driver Discussion What helps promote “Knowing and Caring for Neighbors?” Seeing my neighbors often Working with people who live nearby Having known these people for years Core Value Value Drivers IndicatorsValue Elements Value Map Example statement capture TEACHING EXAMPLES 37
  38. 38. [ PLEASE VIEW FREE MIND] 38
  39. 39. OTHER MIND MAPPING TOOLS  FreeMind  Freeplane  Compendium  WikkaWiki  XMIND     39
  40. 40. USING VALUE TREES SCORING 40 B+ Western Feel C- Diversity A+ Family Friendly B Close to Nature C+ Western Feel D Diversity B- Family Friendly A+ Close to Nature SCENARIO A SCENARIO B
  41. 41. EXAMPLE: DAMARISCOTTA, ME 41
  42. 42. USING VALUE TREES SCORING 42 Core Value Western Feel Value Elements Value Drivers Indicators Historic Reminders Historic Buildings Number Ranching Ag Preserves Acres Covered “Hassles” Fences % Ranchers + Score
  43. 43. USING VALUE TREES WEIGHTING Core Value Western Feel Value Elements Value Drivers Indicators Historic Reminders Historic Buildings Number Ranching Ag Preserves Acres Covered “Hassles” Fences % Ranchers 43
  44. 44. COMMUNITYVIZ 44
  45. 45. ® A project of Promoting informed, collaborative decision-making since 2001. In partnership with
  46. 46. 46
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  51. 51. DOUG WALKER, AMY ANDERSON PLACEWAYS, LLC DOUG@PLACEWAYS.COM, AMY@PLACEWAYS.COM 303.442.8800 51 Enjoy the rest of CommunityMatters ‘10

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