Communicate magazine - Chris North and Anita Knowles

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Transform conference 2010 - Chris North from Further and Anita Knowles from Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

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Communicate magazine - Chris North and Anita Knowles

  1. 1. © Further 2010 Branding an Academic Health Sciences Centre More than intelligent design (although that’s important too)
  2. 2. © Further 2010 What’s an Academic Health Sciences Centre? The Department of Health’s name for the collaboration between a world-class research-led university and leading NHS teaching hospitals. Replicating in the UK the model collaborations in such centres as Johns Hopkins in the US and Karolinska in Sweden Creating world-class centres of research, teaching and care Translating research from laboratory bench to the patient’s bed
  3. 3. © Further 2010 Who is involved? Four proud, long established, and famous organisations With all the (small p) politics of great academic and medical institutions
  4. 4. © Further 2010 Starting the process Starting in 2007 aiming to complete the selection and validation process in 2009 Perception research, naming, brand definition and brand development very much part of the development process Linked to the development of governance and working agreements A small p partnership – not a takeover or a merger The AHSC would therefore need to be both a supporting brand, and also a leading brand in its own right
  5. 5. © Further 2010 A brand is a living entity… the product of a thousand small gestures Not just a logo, name or visual identity, but an organisation’s reputation and a commitment to certain standards – an impression – a promise – an experience – and a product Brands are created in the minds of people Existing and potential staff, customers, influencers, media, regulators, competitors – in fact everyone who comes into contact …and your brand is delivered by every individual in and from the organisation
  6. 6. © Further 2010 An Academic Health Science Centre brand exists in an academic, social, political, economic, and increasingly, international context
  7. 7. © Further 2010 The process we follow • Stakeholder audit • Research as necessary – covering all main audiences • Evaluate current brand • Set criteria for evaluation • Define brand • Map brand expression and values – Proposition – Personality • Comms strategy • Messaging • Audience focused plans • Appropriate tools and channels • Visual design • Engagement • Campaigns • Design enactment and delivery • Evaluate • Modify, refine and develop as necessary • Tracking research Discover Define DevelopDeliver Determine
  8. 8. © Further 2010 Discover Worldwide and UK research exploring the existing brand equity of the partner organisations and a range of alternative naming routes • 50 international and UK depth interviews Focus groups covering post-graduate students, patients, stakeholders such as GPs, PCTs and local authorities, governors and board members Some surprising results regarding international and academic perceptions But clearly worldwide academic equity in the King’s name London, probably the most richly diverse city in the world, also had value in its own right And overall, it was clear that the driving purpose of the new organisation would always be better patient outcomes
  9. 9. © Further 2010 The name Worldwide recognition of leading research-led university The unifying descriptor of the health and biomedical schools of KCL and the hospitals (both acute and mental health) A working agreement – not a merger – and not technically a legal ‘partnership’ Kings  Health  Partners
  10. 10. © Further 2010 Define The combination of • King’s College London’s spread of health and health related schools (social policy, ethics etc) • Three of London’s greatest teaching hospitals • One of the best mental health trusts in the UK and the internationally famous Institute of Psychiatry Pointed to a uniquely comprehensive offering • better research, care, teaching and training for the body and mind • delivered in London, for the ultimate benefit of the world
  11. 11. © Further 2010 A brand pyramid Customers Proposition What does it offer me? Does it appeal to me? Does it do in practice what it promises? Personality Practice PositioningPositioning Stakeholders, internal & external Competitors, opinion formers and influencers Outside in The things that influence how we position for success Inside out Defining the proposition we believe will best drive enduring success What you stand for, what makes you special and what you want to be famous for
  12. 12. © Further 2010 What is in the brand? Improving the speed, efficiency and effectiveness of health research Translational Research Concentration on physical, mental and emotional health. And broader issues of medical ethics, medical law, Public health Whole Person Improving care, treatment and prevention of healthproblems for individuals and society alike. Medical Advances Working together in London, a world city, to deliver he best care for local patients in all their diversity London and the World Better health and well-being
  13. 13. © Further 2010 Putting that into a narrative Essence Pioneering better health for all Mission To advance health and well-being by integrating world class research, care and teaching Vision To be a world leader in improving health and well-being Values We put patient care at the heart of everything we do, attracting and developing the best people, collaborating to translate pioneering research into new standards of healthcare for London and the world
  14. 14. © Further 2010 Message platform Strapline Pioneering better health for all Descriptor King’s Health Partners is one of the world’s leading Academic Health Sciences Centres Proposition King’s Health Partners brings together in London the world’s best in research, care and teaching to pioneer better ways of advancing health and well-being
  15. 15. © Further 2010 Design Seeking Differentiation • From NHS and medical norms • From other UK AHSC candidates Seeking distinction • International impact • Image impact • Colour impact
  16. 16. © Further 2010 Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin, together with Ray Gosling and other colleagues at King’s, made crucial contributions to the discovery of DNA’s structure in 1953. In 1950 they obtained the first clearly crystalline X-ray diffraction patterns from DNA fibres. It was suggested that the patterns indicated that DNA was helical (spiral) in structure. Rosalind Franklin came to King’s in early 1951 and that summer she took the famous ‘Photo 51’ which showed it. The genetic heritage
  17. 17. © Further 2010 The visual inspiration
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  30. 30. © Further 2010 The launch
  31. 31. © Further 2010 The challenge was how to combine a proud and long history of academic and hospital excellence with an exciting and dynamic vision for the future – all in an increasingly competitive world We wanted to create a brand with real ‘wow factor’
  32. 32. © Further 2010 The solution involved • Consideration of all audiences • Alignment with strategy • Enactment across all media • Engagement by all staff • Delivery before, during and after • Creative insight
  33. 33. © Further 2010 Eigtheen months on the brand has had widespread approval, engagement and recognition. And it’s even won Transform’s top branding award.
  34. 34. © Further 2010 Any questions?
  35. 35. © Further 2010 77 Kingsway London WC2B 6SR +44 (0) 20 7543 2000 www.furthercreative.co.uk Chris North T +44 (0)20 7543 2004 M +44 (0)7778 268 459 chris.north@furthercreative.co.uk St Thomas’ Hospital Lambeth Palace Road London SE1 7EH Anita Knowles T +44 (0)20 7188 1554 M +44 (0)7879 466 770 anita.knowles@gstt.nhs.uk

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