Factbook 2011
TABLE OF CONTENTS            Regional Overview •    3	          Industry & Workforce •   7	        Cost of Doing Business ...
Regional Overview                                                                       COLUMBUS ECONOMIC MARKETThe Columb...
The Columbus economyThe Columbus Region has a diversified economy where no single major industry sector represents more th...
In the past decade, the fastest growing sectors have been education and health (+28 percent), transportation and utilities...
Fifteen Fortune 1000 companies are headquartered in the region, including six Fortune 500 companies.Several other Fortune ...
Industry  WorkforceMAJOR EMPLOYERSRANK        Largest Private Sector Employers                        FTE in Region       ...
Largest Manufacturers by                                                                                                  ...
Fastest growing private companies by annual sales growth (Columbus MSA)   Rank                                       Compa...
Key Sectors: Science and TechnologyFast Facts	 •	 large, educated workforce, combined with superior research capabilities ...
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL COUNTY EMPLOYMENT    MAJOR TECHNOLOGY COMPANIES    Battelle Memorial Institute ...
Science and technology occupations employment and wages (COLUMBUS MSA)occupation                                          ...
Key Sectors: LogisticsFast Facts	 •	 ocated at the heart of the Midwestern United States, the Columbus Region provides eas...
LOGISTICS OCCUPATIONS EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES     MAJOR LOGISTICS COMPANIES     Abbott Nutrition     Allied Mineral Products ...
LOGISTICS OCCUPATIONS EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES (COLUMBUS MSA)occupation                                                       ...
Key Sectors: ManufacturingFast Facts	 •	 anufacturing in the Columbus Region employed 81,807 in 2009 (QCEW). The sector co...
Assets Continued                                                                   	 •	 hio Manufacturing Institute (OMI) ...
MANUFACTURING OCCUPATIONS EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES (COLUMBUS MSA)OCCUPATION                                                   ...
KEY SECTORS: HEADQUARTER  BUSINESS SERVICESFast Facts	 •	 he Columbus Region is home to the headquarters of 15 Fortune 100...
HEADQUARTER AND BUSINESS SERVICES OCCUPATIONS EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES (COLUMBUS MSA)OCCUPATION                               ...
HEADQUARTERS AND BUSINESS SERVICES LOCATIONS Office Rental Asking Rates (per square foot)metro area              class b  ...
Industry RankingsTop Ten States by Number of                                                        Biofuels Manufacturing...
Quality WorkforcePopulationThe Columbus population, well-educated and relatively young, is growing at a pace above the nat...
Percent of population age 25+ with associate’s or bachelor’s degree and higher                                            ...
Institutional Infrastructure – Educationand ResearchUniversities and CollegesThe Columbus Region is home to more than 40 c...
Colleges  Universities  No.          College/University             Enrollment   1     The Ohio State University          ...
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
Columbus 2011 Factbook
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Columbus 2011 Factbook

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Columbus 2011 Factbook

  1. 1. Factbook 2011
  2. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS Regional Overview • 3 Industry & Workforce • 7 Cost of Doing Business • 29 Incentives • 34 Transportation Network • 37 Quality of Life • 42 About Us • 46
  3. 3. Regional Overview COLUMBUS ECONOMIC MARKETThe Columbus Region The Columbus Region is an eleven-county area comprising Delaware, Fairfield, Marion County Franklin, Knox, Licking, Logan, Madison, Marion, Morrow, Pickaway and Union Knox County counties. This Region represents the coverage area of Columbus2020!’s Logan County economic development activities. 68 The Columbus Region varies from the Columbus Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which comprises 8 of the above 11 counties (excluding Knox, Logan and Marion). Wherever possible, the information and data in this document covers the eleven-county region. However, some data are only available at the MSA level and are identified as such in the text, title or source. • Eleven-county region located in Central Ohio • Population of 2 million people • Population growth rate of 1.3 percent annually • Eight-county Columbus MSA, 2nd fastest growing among Midwest metro areas with at least 1 million in population • Driver of Ohio’s population and economic growth • 44 colleges and universities • 146,515 college students and home of the largest university in the country • Home to 15 Fortune 1000 headquarters Columbus and Franklin County • State capital and largest Ohio city • 15th largest city in the U.S. Columbus is well connected to the rest of the U.S. and beyond: SHARE OF THE AMERICAN POPULATION • Port Columbus International Airport: 33 WITHIN A RADIUS OF 500 MILES destination airports with 155 daily flights Less than 5% • Enhanced freight rail connections to East 5% - 15% Coast ports in Norfolk, VA, Baltimore, MD, 15% - 25% and Wilmington, NC. 25% - 35% • One-day truck drive to 47 percent of the More than 35% U.S. population, higher than other major distribution centers in the U.S. (Source: Dr. Jean Paul Rodrigue, Hofstra University) THE COLUMBUS REGION 3
  4. 4. The Columbus economyThe Columbus Region has a diversified economy where no single major industry sector represents more than 17 percentof employment. Finance and insurance, advanced manufacturing, health, logistics and other industries are complementedby the presence of The Ohio State University and the state capital.Figure 1A. Regional Employment by Sector CONSTRUCTION MINING MANUFACTURING 3% WHOLESALE TRADE 9% 17% GOVERNMENT 4% OTHER SERVICES 5% 11% RETAIL TRADE 10% LEISURE HOSPITALITY 5% TRANSPORT UTILITIES 13% 7% EDUCATION HEALTH 16% FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES PROFESSIONAL BUS. SVCS.Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, 2009 THE COLUMBUS REGION 4
  5. 5. In the past decade, the fastest growing sectors have been education and health (+28 percent), transportation and utilities(+21 percent), and professional and business services (+11 percent). Continued investment in the Rickenbacker Global LogisticsPark and other areas of the region’s logistics sector has been a major factor in the growth of transportation and utilities. igureAChngeineginlmmener FIGURE 2A. CHANGE IN REGIONAL EMPLOYMENT BY SECTOR, 2001-2009 2001 2009 159,800 Government +6% Government 150,190 145,430 Prof. Bus. Svcs. +11% Prof. Bus. Svcs. 131,518 Retail 126,242 124,140 Education Health +28% Manufacturing 112,723 104,150 Retail -17% Education Health 96,876 90,872 Leisure Hospitality +6% Leisure Hospitality 86,084 Financial activities 74,295 81,807 Manufacturing -27% 67,882 Financial activities -9% Construction Mining 47,235 45,643 Transportation Utilities +21% Wholesale Trade 38,527 35,819 Wholesale trade -7% Transportation Utilities 37,661 32,268 Construction Mining -32% Other Services 29,683 27,063 Other services -9% Information 23,691 17,719 Information -25%Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, 2009Top Sectors by Economic Output, 2010 (billions of dollars Financial activities $24.7Professional and business services $14.3 Government $12.3 Manufacturing $9.1 Education and Health $7.4Source: Moody’s Economy.com THE COLUMBUS REGION 5
  6. 6. Fifteen Fortune 1000 companies are headquartered in the region, including six Fortune 500 companies.Several other Fortune 1000 and major international companies are among the region’s largest employers.Company Fortune 1000 Rank Presence in REGION EMPLOYMENT IN REGIONAbbott Laboratories 69 Significant operations 2,200Abercrombie Fitch 599 Headquarters 2,000Aetna 77 Significant operations 1,180Alliance Data Systems 693 Significant operations 2,030American Electric Power 169 Headquarters 3,527Anheuser-Busch Foreign-owned Significant operations 780Ashland Inc. 272 Significant operations 1,500Big Lots 453 Headquarters 1,310Bob Evans Farms 962 Headquarters 350Boehringer Ingelheim Roxane Inc. Foreign-owned Significant operations 1,100Boeing 36 Significant operations 550Cardinal Health 19 Headquarters 4,030Cardington Yutaka Technologies Foreign-owned Significant operations 700Discover Financial Services 291 Significant operations 1,030Emerson Electric 120 Significant operations 2,000Express Inc 902 Headquarters 800Federal Express 73 Significant operations 700Fifth Third Bancorp 326 Significant operations 589General Mills 166 Significant operations 300Greif 600 Headquarters 250Honda of America Foreign-owned Significant operations 11,067Huntington Bancshares 632 Headquarters 4,170JP Morgan Chase 13 Significant operations 17,438Limited Brands 258 Headquarters 5,200McGraw-Hill 372 Significant operations 1,495Medco Health Solutions 34 Significant operations 3,831Mettler-Toledo International 886 Headquarters 666Momentive Performance Materials 433 Headquarters 320Nationwide 127 Headquarters 11,235Nucor Steel Marion 157 Significant operations 405Owens Corning 448 Significant operations 1,000PepsiCo 43 Significant operations 470PPG Industries 181 Significant operations 495Retail Ventures 933 Headquarters 500Rolls-Royce Energy Systems Foreign-owned Significant operations 1,200Safelite Foreign-owned Significant operations 1,456Scotts Miracle-Gro Co. 636 Headquarters 1,012Stanley Electric Foreign-owned Significant operations 750State Farm Insurance 37 Significant operations 1,894Teleperformance USA Foreign-owned Significant operations 1,620Time Warner Cable 95 Significant operations 1,084TS Tech North America Foreign-owned Significant operations 1,720United Parcel Service 48 Significant operations 1,623Wendy’s 603 Headquarters 450Whirlpool Corp. 143 Significant operations 3,066Worthington Industries 891 Headquarters 1,229 THE COLUMBUS REGION 6
  7. 7. Industry WorkforceMAJOR EMPLOYERSRANK Largest Private Sector Employers FTE in Region The Columbus Region has nearly 300 1 JPMorgan Chase 17,438 internationally owned companies with 2 Nationwide 11,235 one or more establishments in the 3 Honda of America Manufacturing Inc. 11,067 11-county area. 4 Kroger Co. 5,417 5 Limited Brands Inc. 5,200 country Companies 6 Huntington Bancshares Inc. 4,170 Japan 92 7 Cardinal Health Inc. 4,030 8 Medco Health Solutions Inc. 3,831 Germany 35 9 American Electric Power Company Inc. 3,527 UK 32 10 Whirlpool Corp. 3,066 Canada 23 11 Battelle 2,618 12 Abbott Laboratories 2,200 France 19 13 Alliance Data 2,030 Switzerland 21 14 Abercrombie Fitch 2,000 Netherlands 12 15 Emerson Network Power/Liebert Corp. 2,000 16 State Farm Insurance 1,894 17 TS Tech North America 1,720 18 Exel 1,663 19 United Parcel Service 1,623 20 Teleperformance 1,620 21 Giant Eagle Inc. 1,600 22 Ashland Inc. 1,500 23 McGraw-Hill Education/School Education 1,495 24 Safelite 1,456 25 Big Lots Inc. 1,310Sources: olumbus2020!; Columbus Business First, Book of Lists, 2010; local economic development agencies C THE COLUMBUS REGION 7
  8. 8. Largest Manufacturers by Columbus region Employees Central Ohio Rank Manufacturer Employees Honda of America 1 11,067 Manufacturing Inc. 2 Whirlpool Corp. 3,066 3 Abbott Nutrition 2,200 Emerson Network 4 2,000 Power/Liebert Corp. internationalLY OWNED companies RANKED BY NUMBER OF COLUMBUS REGION EMPLOYEES 5 TS Tech North America 1,720 Rank Company Employees Headquarters 6 Anchor Hocking Co. 1,248 1 Honda of America Manufacturing Inc. 11,067 Japan Worthington Industries 2 TS Tech North America 1,720 Japan 7 1,229 Inc. 3 Exel 1,663 Germany Rolls-Royce Energy 8 1,200 Systems 4 Teleperformance 1,620 France Boehringer Ingelheim 9 1,100 5 SafeliteAutoGlass 1,456 Belgium Roxane Inc. 6 Rolls-Royce Energy Systems 1,200 UK 10 Owens Corning 1,024 7 Boehringer Ingelheim Roxane Inc. 1,100 Germany 11 Scotts Miracle-Gro Co. 1,012 8 Anheuser-Busch Inc. 780 Belgium 9 Stanley Electric U.S. Co. Inc. 750 Japan 12 Ariel Corp 918 10 American Showa 709 Japan 13 Lancaster Colony Corp. 855 11 Cardington Yutaka Technologies 700 Japan 14 Anheuser-Busch Inc. 780 12 Mettler-Toledo International Inc. 666 Switzerland 13 Alcatel-Lucent 625 France 15 American Showa 709 14 Midwest Express Group 598 Japan Cardington Yutaka 16 700 Technologies 15 Showa Aluminum Corp. 480 Japan Silver Line Windows 17 700 16 Invensys Climate Controls 420 UK Doors 17 AGC Automotive Americas 407 Japan Mettler-Toledo 18 666 International Inc. 18 Jefferson Industries Corp. 400 Japan 19 Anomatic Corp. 650 19 Daido Metal 375 Japan 20 Nifco America Corp. 300 Japan 20 Columbus Castings 575Sources: Columbus2020!; Columbus Business First, Book of Lists, 2010; local economic development agencies THE COLUMBUS REGION 8
  9. 9. Fastest growing private companies by annual sales growth (Columbus MSA) Rank Company Industry 1 Cyber Technology LLC Insurance 2 CallCopy Inc. Call Recording 3 Reliant Capital Solutions LLC Business Consultant 4 Mission Essential Personnel LLC Professional Services 5 Thirty-One Gifts LLC Retail 6 Insource Logistics LLC Logistics 7 Whitestone Group Inc. Security 8 Pepper Construction Company of Ohio LLC Construction 9 Compass Homes Inc. Real Estate 10 ClearSaleing Inc. Advertising 11 Anu Resources Unlimited Inc. Human Resources 12 Zipline Logistics LLC Logistics Information 13 Leading Edje LLC Technology 14 E-Cycle LLC Waste Management 15 Advanced Engineering Consultants Ltd. Engineering 16 PCPD LLC Retail 17 Astor and Black Custom Ltd. Retail 18 Axia Consulting LLC IT Consultant 19 Inside Outfitters Inc. Retail 20 Navigator Management Partners LLC IT Consultant Largest Banks and Savings Loans Companies by Central Ohio Deposits (Columbus MSA) Rank Bank Central Ohio Deposits Bank Assets Equity Capital 1 Huntington National Bank $10.23 billion $51.11 billion $2.82 billion 2 JPMorgan Chase $7.74 billion $1.63 trillion $127.29 billion 3 Fifth Third Bank $3.55 billion $112.74 billion $16.3 billion 4 PNC $2.86 billion $260.31 billion $28.51 billion 5 Nationwide Bank $1.95 billion $3.21 billion $296.4 million 6 Park National Bank $1.65 billion $6.19 billion $414.3 million 7 Key Bank $1.57 billion $90.18 billion $8.58 billion 8 U.S. Bank $1.06 billion $276.38 billion $24.6 billion 9 WesBanco Bank Inc. $674 million $5.38 billion $677.6 million 10 Delaware County Bank Trust Co. $565.4 million $674.7 million $49.8 millionSources: Columbus Business First, Book of lists 2010 THE COLUMBUS REGION 9
  10. 10. Key Sectors: Science and TechnologyFast Facts • large, educated workforce, combined with superior research capabilities and a strong corporate foundation, has allowed A Central Ohio to become one of the fastest growing innovation and technology hubs in the nation. • he 315 Research Technology Corridor is one of the largest research-based sites in the U.S., employing more than 50,000 T people and managing more than $1 billion in research grants annually. • olumbus was identified as the “No. 1 up-and-coming tech city in the United States,” according to Forbes in 2008. C • ,043 science and technology establishments in the Columbus Region employ more than 38,300 workers (QCEW 2009). 2 • he MSA has a location quotient of 1.11 in science and technology sector employment compared to the nation. T • he state’s $1.6 billion program to develop industry clusters in targeted high-tech sectors has already changed Ohio’s T economic landscape in such areas as biomedical imaging and advanced materials. As of June 2009, the $469 million expended thus far in Third Frontier funds has leveraged over $4 billion of additional funding and created an estimated 48,000 direct and indirect jobs.Assets • ome to two of the world’s leading private-research institutions, Battelle Memorial Institute and Chemical Abstract Services. H • hree of Ohio’s seven Edison Technology Centers, including BioOhio, Edison Welding Institute, and Polymer Ohio, which T provide product and process innovation and commercialization services to both established and early-stage technology-based businesses. • echColumbus accelerates the growth of the innovation economy by providing vital resources and assistance to people and T enterprises that depend on technology to achieve their business goals. • cience and Technology Campus Corporation, a state-of-the-art research park located on The Ohio State University campus S links world-class academic technical expertise with commercial innovation. • hio Supercomputer Center, provides supercomputing, cyber-infrastructure, research and educational resources for academic O research, industry and government. • he Dublin Entrepreneurial Center taps into the entrepreneurs and ideas generated in the Dublin community. T • ransportation Research Center, a world leading provider of vehicular testing services, independently managing a 4,500 acre T transportation research and testing facility serving the needs of industries, governments, trade associations, and educational organizations worldwide. • NC@8000, a business incubator in New Albany, boasts an entire floor with more than 16,000 square feet dedicated as a hub I for startups and entrepreneurial activities, designed to create a flow of ideas and interconnectivity. • 6,580 people in science and technology occupations in the MSA with an average wage of $73,778 (Occupational Employment 4 Statistics 2010). THE COLUMBUS REGION 10
  11. 11. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL COUNTY EMPLOYMENT MAJOR TECHNOLOGY COMPANIES Battelle Memorial Institute MARION Online Computer Library Center MORROW Sterling Commerce KNOX LOGAN Teksystems UNION Accenture DELAWARE Information Control Corp. LICKING Sogeti USA LLC FRANKLIN Quick Solutions Inc. Modis Consulting MADISON Unicon International Inc. FAIRFIELD Nestle PTC PICKAWAY OHIO THIRD FRONTIER The Ohio Third Frontier is an unprecedented commitment to create % SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY new technology-based products, 0.20 –2.00 companies, industries and jobs. In May 2011, the Ohio Third Frontier was 2.01 – 3.00 extended through 2015 indicating 3.01 – 4.00 a widely held understanding by the 4.01 – 5.00 populace that technology and innovation will lead to economic prosperity both 5.01 – 6.34 today and for future generations. The $2.3 billion initiative supports applied research and commercialization, NUMBER OF WORKERS AND AVERAGE HOURLY WAGES IN SCIENCE, ENGINEERING AND IT OCCUPATIONS (COLUMBUS MSA) entrepreneurial assistance, early-stage capital formation, and expansion of REGION WORKERS AVERAGE HOURLY WAGE a skilled talent pool that can support 59,550 $33.80 technology-based economic growth. The Ohio Third Frontier’s strategic intent Raleigh 42,160 $34.02 is to create an “innovation ecosystem” Atlanta 125,310 $35.80 that supports the efficient and seamless transition of great ideas from the Minneapolis 117,020 $35.85 laboratory to the marketplace. Chicago 192,680 $36.43 Austin 72,430 $37.02 Seattle 161,780 $40.20 San Francisco 159,910 $43.00Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, March 2009; U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, May 2010 THE COLUMBUS REGION 11
  12. 12. Science and technology occupations employment and wages (COLUMBUS MSA)occupation Marion employment hourly mean wage Aerospace Engineers County 80 $43.82 Computer Hardware Engineers 140 $40.57 Electrical Engineers 990 $35.33 Industrial Engineers 2,000 $35.21 Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technicians 660 $25.21 Electro-Mechanical Technicians 50 $24.55 Biochemists and Biophysicists 90 $30.23 Microbiologists 110 $30.77 Biological Scientists All Other 80 $27.00 Chemists 340 $31.39 Environmental Scientists and Specialists Including Health 660 $34.08 Biological Technicians 420 $17.85 Life Physical and Social Science Technicians All Other 450 $21.54 Average asking rent for RD and flex space, Q4 2010 METRO AREA per sq ft per sq M Dallas-Fort Worth $6.42 $69.10 Atlanta $6.76 $72.76 $6.79 $73.09 Houston $7.35 $79.11 THE OHIO STATE UNIV. Cincinnati $7.99 $86.00 Chicago $8.15 $87.73 Jacksonville $8.35 $89.88 Charlotte $8.64 $93.00 Baltimore $9.18 $98.81 Denver $9.31 $100.21 Science and Technology Assets New Jersey, north central $9.43 $101.50 A - Chemical Abstracts Service B - Battelle Memorial Institute Los Angeles $9.65 $103.87 C - BioOhio D - Edison Welding Institute E - Dublin Entrepreneurial Center F - Polymer Ohio Oakland-East Bay $9.91 $106.67 G - TechColumbus H - Ohio Supercomputer Center Pittsburgh $12.46 $134.12 I - Science and Technology Campus Corporation Long Island, NY $12.97 $139.61Sources: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, May 2010; Grubb Ellis, Industrial Market Trends, Q4 2010 THE COLUMBUS REGION 12
  13. 13. Key Sectors: LogisticsFast Facts • ocated at the heart of the Midwestern United States, the Columbus Region provides easy access to major national L and global markets. • he Columbus Region is within a 10-hour truck drive of 47 percent of the U.S. population and 47 percent of the U.S. T manufacturing capacity. • ,377 logistics establishments with more than 70,000 employees, yielding a location quotient for employment of 1.15 of 4 the U.S. (QCEW, 2009). • verage wages in distribution and logistics occupations in the Columbus MSA are 13.5 percent higher than the MSA average, A adjusted for skill level (analysis of Occupational Employment Statistics, May 2010). • 2.1 percent employment growth projected in 2006-2016 for the transportation and warehousing sector in the Columbus 2 MSA (Ohio LMI 2010). • ickenbacker International Airport handled more than 149 million pounds of air cargo in the 12 months ended March 2011. R • he Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business is ranked No. 7 among supply chain/logistics programs nationwide T (U.S. News World Report 2012).Assets • ort Columbus International flies to 33 destination airports with 155 daily flights. In 2009, it served more than 6.2 million P passengers. The Port Columbus Master Plan demonstrates capacity for future expansion and improvements to accommodate beyond 10 million passengers per year. • he new Heartland Corridor allows double-stacked freight trains to travel directly from the Port of Virginia to a state-of-the- T art intermodal facility located at Rickenbacker International Airport in Franklin County. • he Heartland Corridor connects Columbus to Virginia ports that will increase their capacity in anticipation of the Panama T Canal’s expansion in 2014. • ickenbacker International Airport is a dynamic, international logistics center home to a tremendous base of air, rail and road R transport companies. It handles more than 300,000 lifts a year and offers $660 million in transportation cost savings to shippers. • $59 million CSX intermodal freight terminal expansion is underway in Columbus. The expansion is part of the National A Gateway initiative, linking deep water east coast ports with Midwestern markets. • ombined intermodal facilities to handle 800,000 container lifts annually, with land and capacity to grow. C • ome to Foreign Trade Zone No. 138, which comprises six pre-designated Magnet Sites and can provide FTZ H designation to any site located within a 25-county service area in Central Ohio. • wo national and one regional rail carrier: Norfolk Southern, CSX Transportation, Ohio Central. T THE COLUMBUS REGION 13
  14. 14. LOGISTICS OCCUPATIONS EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES MAJOR LOGISTICS COMPANIES Abbott Nutrition Allied Mineral Products Inc. Big Lots MARION Calypso Logistics MORROW Cardinal Health DB Schenker Logistics KNOX LOGAN Exel UNION Faro Logistics Services Inc. DELAWARE FedEx FST Logistics LICKING Hyperlogistics Group FRANKLIN Kahiki Foods Kraft Limited Brands MADISON McGraw Hill Mettler-Toledo International Inc. FAIRFIELD Midwest Express Group PICKAWAY Nash Finch Co. Nex Transport Inc. ODW Logistics % LOGISTICS Ohio Steel Industries Inc. 2.20 – 4.00 Pacer International 4.01 – 6.00 Plaskolite 6.01 – 8.00 RCV II Logistics 8.01 – 10.00 Spartan Logistics 10.01 – 12.97 Sterling Commerce Tech International UPS Vista Industrial Packaging NUMBER OF WORKERS AND AVERAGE HOURLY WAGES IN TRANSPORTATION AND MATERIAL MOVING OCCUPATIONS (COLUMBUS MSA) REGION WORKERS AVERAGE HOURLY WAGE 68,710 $14.85 Indianapolis 78,770 $15.38 Memphis 73,920 $15.41 Los Angeles 340,440 $15.53 Pittsburgh 66,680 $15.64 Atlanta 169,790 $16.29 Chicago 319,450 $16.46 Louisville 56,280 $17.26Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, March 2009; U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; Occupational Employment Statistics, May 2010 THE COLUMBUS REGION 14
  15. 15. LOGISTICS OCCUPATIONS EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES (COLUMBUS MSA)occupation employment hourly mean wage Purchasing Managers 370 $49.30 Transportation Storage and Distribution Managers 850 $41.53 Business Operations Specialists All Other* 7,390 $31.26 Sales Representatives Wholesale and Manufacturing Technical and Scientific Products 4,270 $37.77 Sales Representatives Wholesale and Manufacturing Except Technical and Scientific Products 9,000 $29.66 First-Line Supervisors of Production and Operating Workers 3,140 $25.88 Inspectors Testers Sorters Samplers and Weighers 2,640 $15.43 Packaging and Filling Machine Operators and Tenders 2,040 $17.30 First-Line Supervisors of Helpers Laborers and Material Movers Hand 1,630 $22.04 First-Line Supervisors of Transportation and Material-Moving Machine and Vehicle Operators 1,600 $24.91 Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers 9,520 $19.92 Light Truck or Delivery Services Drivers 5,390 $14.85 Conveyor Operators and Tenders 230 $13.94 Industrial Truck and Tractor Operators 4,430 $14.41 Laborers and Freight Stock and Material Movers Hand 25,570 $13.46 Machine Feeders and Offbearers 1,270 $12.05 Packers and Packagers Hand 7,460 $10.32 Logistics Assets Average asking rent for distribution and warehousing space, Q4 2010 metro area per sq ft per sq M Marion County $2.88 $31.00 Morrow County Cincinnati $3.28 $35.31 Charlotte $3.34 $35.95 Logan County Union County Knox County Atlanta $3.34 $35.95 Dallas-Fort Worth $3.52 $37.89 Chicago $3.90 $41.98 Deleware County Denver $4.01 $43.16 Licking County Jacksonville $4.06 $43.70 Pittsburgh $4.40 $47.36 Houston $4.59 $49.41 Franklin County Baltimore $4.65 $50.05 Madison County New Jersey, north central $4.92 $52.96 Fairfield County Los Angeles $5.28 $56.83 Pickaway County Major Airport Oakland-East Bay $6.20 $66.74 Intermodal Terminal Dual Rail Industrial Park Long Island, NY $8.01 $86.22 National Gateway Corridor Heartland Rail Corridor National Freight Rail Line Major InterstatesSources: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, May 2010; Grubb Ellis, Industrial Market Trends, Q4 2010 THE COLUMBUS REGION 15
  16. 16. Key Sectors: ManufacturingFast Facts • anufacturing in the Columbus Region employed 81,807 in 2009 (QCEW). The sector contributed $9.1 billion to regional M output in 2010, more than any sector other than real estate. • olumbus MSA manufacturing workers averaged $106,000 of output each in 2009, more than their counterparts elsewhere C in the state. • he Columbus Region experienced a 30.3 percent increase in manufacturing productivity (output per worker) after inflation T between 2001 and 2009. • uality sites and buildings with more than 251 million square feet of industrial space and available property averaging a Q direct asking rate of $3.50/SF. • The Columbus Region had 1,929 manufacturing establishments with 81,807 employees (QCEW 2009). • igh output location quotients for manufacturing of beverages (2.15), electrical equipment (1.52), transportation H equipment (2.31), and nonmetallic mineral products (1.91) (Economy.com 2010).Assets • attelle Memorial Institute, the world’s largest contract research and development organization, brings a unique blend of B science and technology disciplines to solve significant logistics challenges for its clients. • dison Welding Institute, North America’s leading organization dedicated to the research and development of welding and E materials joining technologies. • he Ohio State University enrolls over 55,000 students and ranks No. 2 among universities nationwide in industry- T sponsored research. - Fisher College of Business is ranked No. 11 in the nation amoung MBA programs in production/operations and No. 6 among undergraduate programs in this specialization. - Graduate program in industrial and systems engineering is ranked No. 19 in the nation (U.S. News World Report 2011). • olumbus State Community College, one of the nation’s largest community colleges, with engineering certificate programs C in manufacturing, assembly, and computer-aided design. • he Ohio Manufacturing Institute (OMI) is a collaborative network that enables manufacturers to become globally competitive, T locally by connecting industry needs with Ohio assets such as faculty research, student co-located interns, and access to university labs and equipment. THE COLUMBUS REGION 16
  17. 17. Assets Continued • hio Manufacturing Institute (OMI) is a single entry point for O Largest Manufacturers making Ohio State University’s technical resources available to Manufacturer FTE Ohio manufacturers and to facilitate the use of those resources for economic development. OMI collaborates with university faculty, Honda of America 11,067 students, and scientists in the following technical areas to find Manufacturing Inc. solutions for manufacturing challenges: Whirlpool Corp. 3,066 Machining, Tribology, Metrology, Forming Corrosion - Abbott Nutrition 2,200 - Process, Microstructure Performance Modeling - Additive Manufacturing Emerson Network Power/ 2,000 - Welding Joining Liebert Corp. - Design TS Tech North America 1,720 Anchor Hocking Co. 1,248 Manufacturing percentage of total county employment Worthington Industries Inc. 1,229 Rolls-Royce Energy Systems 1,200 Boehringer Ingelheim Roxane Inc. 1,100 Owens Corning 1,024 MARION MORROW Scotts Miracle-Gro Co. 1,012 Ariel Corp 918 KNOX LOGAN Lancaster Colony Corp. 855 UNION DELAWARE Anheuser-Busch Inc. 780 American Showa 709 LICKING Cardington Yutaka Technologies 700 FRANKLIN Silver Line Windows Doors 700 Mettler-Toledo International Inc. 666 MADISON Anomatic Corp. 650 FAIRFIELD Columbus Castings 575 PICKAWAY Boeing Guidance Repair Ctr. 550 DuPont 550 Kroger Co. - Bakery Division 508 % Manufacturing Select Sires, Inc. 500 5.36 – 8.00 Crane Group Co. 500 8.01 – 12.00 PPG Industries Inc. 495 12.01 – 16.00 Showa Aluminum Inc. 480 16.01 – 24.00 GJ Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. 470 24.01 – 34.37 Arvin Meritor 450 Wyandot Inc. 425Source: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, 2009; Columbus Business First Book of Lists, 2010; Local Economic Development Agencies THE COLUMBUS REGION 17
  18. 18. MANUFACTURING OCCUPATIONS EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES (COLUMBUS MSA)OCCUPATION EMPLOYMENT HOURLY MEAN WAGEIndustrial Production Managers 900 $45.86Business Operations Specialists All Other 7,390 $31.26Electrical Engineers 990 $35.33Industrial Engineers 2,000 $35.21Mechanical Engineers 1,710 $32.97Industrial Machinery Mechanics 1,670 $25.23Maintenance Workers Machinery 460 $23.40First-Line Supervisors of Production and Operating Workers 3,140 $25.88Structural Metal Fabricators and Fitters 510 $18.03Team Assemblers 8,000 $15.40Machinists 1,790 $18.49Welders Cutters Solderers and Brazers 1,280 $16.01Inspectors Testers Sorters Samplers and Weighers 2,640 $15.43Packaging and Filling Machine Operators and Tenders 2,040 $17.30Production Workers All Other 1,770 $17.19Machine Feeders and Offbearers 1,270 $12.05Packers and Packagers Hand 7,460 $10.32NUMBER OF WORKERS AND AVERAGE HOURLY INDUSTRIAL PARKSWAGES IN PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS AVERAGEMETRO AREA WORKERS HOURLY WAGE Marion County 49,690 $16.27Indianapolis 54,850 $16.40 Knox CountyChicago 294,090 $16.83 LoganPittsburgh 62,150 $17.03 CountyMinneapolis 117,810 $17.41 68Louisville 48,300 $17.44Detroit 139,680 $19.43Seattle 84,980 $19.92 Industrial Park Locations THE COLUMBUS REGION 18
  19. 19. KEY SECTORS: HEADQUARTER BUSINESS SERVICESFast Facts • he Columbus Region is home to the headquarters of 15 Fortune 1000 T Fortune 1000 Companies companies, six of which are Fortune 500 companies. Headquartered in the Region • ore than 21,000 workers employed directly in more than 300 corporate M Fortune 1000 Company Name managing offices in the Columbus Region, yielding a location quotient of Ranking 1.61 (QCEW, 2009). Cardinal Health 19 • arge back office companies and operations include: Teleperformance L Nationwide 127 USA, Verizon Wireless, Time Warner Cable, JPMorgan Chase, Nationwide Insurance, State Farm Insurance, Aetna. American Electric Power 169 • nsurance carriers are a particularly important segment of the region’s I Limited Brands 258 back office operations. These firms employ more than 27,000, giving a Momentive Performance location quotient of 1.82 (QCEW, 2009). 433 Materials • he Columbus Region has the most competitive corporate tax climate T Big Lots 453 in the Midwest. • early 300,000 in occupations in management, business and finance, N Abercrombie Fitch 599 office and administrative support, and IT in the MSA, giving an overall Greif 600 location quotient of 1.14 (OES, 2010). Huntington Bancshares 632 • mple business service support is available in the Region, with 59,900 A employed in more than 5,600 professional and technical establishments Scotts Miracle-Gro Co. 636 (location quotient of 1.13) and 60,700 in more than 2,500 administrative Mettler-Toledo International 886 support establishments (location quotient of 1.25) (QCEW, 2009). Worthington Industries 891 • rivate sector workforce unionization rate of 5.2 percent is below the P Express Inc 902 national average of 6.9 percent and 14th lowest among the 62 Midwest metro areas with 50,000 or more employees (Unionstats 2010). Retail Ventures 933 • ome to 44 colleges and universities with a total enrollment of more H Bob Evans Farms 962 than 146,000 undergraduate and graduate students Latest as of July 14, 2011Assets • ob Creation Tax Credit is a refundable tax credit to companies creating at least 25 full-time jobs (within three years) in Ohio. J • orkforce Guarantee Program provides 100 percent reimbursable training grants to employers that are creating at least 20 W job positions. Projects can be funded up to $750,000. • nterprise Zones/Community Reinvestment Areas provide property tax abatements for businesses that invest in designated E areas of Ohio. • he Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business ranks 25th in the U.S. for its MBA program and 14th for its undergraduate T program (U.S. News and World Report, 2012 and 2011, respectively). The College has eight Master’s programs and three PhD programs. THE COLUMBUS REGION 19
  20. 20. HEADQUARTER AND BUSINESS SERVICES OCCUPATIONS EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES (COLUMBUS MSA)OCCUPATION EMPLOYMENT HOURLY MEAN WAGE Management Occupations 36,790 $50.37 Business and Financial Operations Occupations 53,690 $30.55 Computer and Mathematical Science Occupations 38,030 $35.69 Architecture and Engineering Occupations 14,300 $31.48 Life, Physical, and Social Science Occupations 7,220 $28.44 Community and Social Services Occupations 12,780 $21.46 Legal Occupations 7,030 $37.62 Education, Training, and Library Occupations 51,830 $25.40 Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media Occupations 12,990 $24.44 Healthcare Practitioner and Technical Occupations 50,960 $34.05 Healthcare Support Occupations 32,670 $12.11 Office and Administrative Support Occupations 164,340 $16.12 Sales and Related Occupations 88,760 $17.18 NUMBER OF WORKERS AND AVERAGE HOURLY WAGES IN MANAGEMENT, BUSINESS AND OFFICE SUPPORT OCCUPATIONS MSA WORKERS AVERAGE HOURLY WAGE Nashville 209,730 $23.51 Indianapolis 222,970 $24.10 254,820 $24.11 Dallas 813,030 $25.99 Charlotte 184,550 $27.16 Chicago 1,157,950 $27.49 Atlanta 691,830 $27.83 Minneapolis 492,770 $28.37Sources: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; Occupational Employment Statistics, May 2010 THE COLUMBUS REGION 20
  21. 21. HEADQUARTERS AND BUSINESS SERVICES LOCATIONS Office Rental Asking Rates (per square foot)metro area class b class a Marion $14.26 $18.03 CountyPittsburgh $19.09 $21.94 KnoxAtlanta $17.48 $22.77 CountyDallas $17.90 $23.16 Logan CountyMinneapolis $18.78 $23.45Phoenix $18.76 $24.10Houston $19.16 $29.33Chicago $24.33 $29.44Seattle $23.08 $30.20Boston $24.33 $34.55Los Angeles $25.71 $35.35Miami $26.14 $36.56 Fortune 1000 Headquarters Back Office or Call Center Operation Data Center MARION MORROW KNOX LOGAN HQ/BUSINESS SERVICES UNION PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL COUNTY DELAWARE EMPLOYMENT % HQ/BACK OFFICE .13 – 1.00 LICKING 1.01 – 3.00 FRANKLIN 3.01 – 5.00 5.01 – 7.00 MADISON 7.01 – 8.01 FAIRFIELD PICKAWAYSources: U.S. Census Bureau, County Business Patterns, March 2009; Grubb Ellis, Office Market Trends Q1 2011 THE COLUMBUS REGION 21
  22. 22. Industry RankingsTop Ten States by Number of Biofuels Manufacturing Top Ten States forNew and Expanded Facilities Research Leaders Biotechnology StrengthReported, 2010 Number ofRank State Rank State Rank State Projects 1 Texas 424 1 Iowa 1 California 2 Ohio 376 2 Illinois 2 Texas 3 Louisiana 347 3 Florida 3 Pennsylvania 4 Pennsylvania 337 4 Texas 4 Massachusetts 5 Georgia 251 5 Kentucky 5 Kansas 6 North Carolina 225 6 North Carolina 6 New Jersey 7 Michigan 213 7 Oklahoma 7 North Carolina 8 Illinois 205 8 Nebraska 8 Illinois 9 Indiana 199 9 Ohio 9 Maryland 10 Virginia 190 10 Kansas 10 OhioTop 10 Large Cities for Energy Top Ten States forProduction and Conservation Biotechnology Strength Top 5 Up-And-Coming Tech Cities Rank City Rank State Rank City 1 Seattle 1 Tennessee 1 2 Denver 2 Kentucky 2 Santa Fe 3 Sacramento 3 South Carolina 3 Palm Beach County 4 San Francisco 5 Portland 4 Michigan 4 Houston 6 Oakland 5 Ohio 5 Milwaukee 7 Boston 8 Anaheim 9 Dallas 10Sources: Site Selection Magazine, March 2011; Business Facilities – Annual Rankings Report, July 2010; CityGrid, 2010; Forbes, March 2008;Business Facilities – Annual Rankings Report, July 2010 THE COLUMBUS REGION 22
  23. 23. Quality WorkforcePopulationThe Columbus population, well-educated and relatively young, is growing at a pace above the national average.Population Change, Metro Areas and U.S., 2000-2010 13.9% Indianapolis 15.2% Kansas City 10.9% Louisville 10.5% Milwaukee 3.7% Nashville 21.2% Pittsburgh - 3.1% U.S. average 9.7%Median Age, Metro Areas and U.S., 2009 42.3 37.8 37.0 36.2 35.5 36.8 34.7 35.4Sources: American Community Survey, 2009; U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 THE COLUMBUS REGION 23
  24. 24. Percent of population age 25+ with associate’s or bachelor’s degree and higher 33.3% 40.0% 31.1% Indianapolis 38.1% 32.8% Kansas City 39.3% 24.9% Louisville 32.0% 30.8% Milwaukee 38.3% 31.0% Nashville 37.4% 27.9% Pittsburgh 36.6% 27.9% U.S. average 35.4%Employment by OccupationThe Columbus MSA has a majority white-collar workforce, including a talent pool of 36,790 in management occupations,53,690 in business and financial occupations, and 38,030 in computer and mathematical science occupations. Manufacturing, Transportation, Construction Farming management Professional Sales ServicesSources: American Community Survey 2009; Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, 2010 THE COLUMBUS REGION 24
  25. 25. Institutional Infrastructure – Educationand ResearchUniversities and CollegesThe Columbus Region is home to more than 40 colleges and universities with a total enrollmentof more than 146,000 students.The Ohio State University, the state’s flagship university and the largest university in the U.S.,has over 56,000 students at its main campus in Columbus. With 170 undergraduate majors andmore than 250 master’s, doctoral and professional degree programs, Ohio State provides theregion with a diverse and talented workforce for the future.Ohio State ranks No. 2 among all U.S. universities in industry-sponsored research, accordingto the National Science Foundation, with leading research programs in chemical engineering(ranked No. 1 nationally), material sciences (No. 3 nationally) , and mathematics (No. 6 nationally).Nearly $750 million of federally and privately sponsored research is spent annually for researchat Ohio State.The Ohio State University – Fisher College of Business • Full-time MBA program ranked No. 25 in U.S. News and World Report, 2012. • BA programs in Logistics Engineering and Operational Excellence are both ranked in the M top ten for programs specialized in supply chain and manufacturing, respectively. • 4,694 undergraduate business majors and 290 full-time MBA students (2010 enrollment). • 10 research centers, including the fields of entrepreneurship, supply chain and production.The Ohio State University – College of Engineering • ince 2005, more than 275 individual companies have invested in research in the S College of Engineering. • 6,118 undergraduate and 1,537 graduate students (2010 enrollment) • n important source of talent for regional employers. Example: 112 engineers with Ohio A State degrees are employed by Honda Research of America (HRA), plus 55 co-op students annually. • SU’s 60-plus research labs and centers include the Center for Automotive Research, O Center for Emergent Materials (CEM), Information Processing Systems Laboratory, Institute for Materials Research and the Ohio Manufacturing Institute (OMI).Columbus State Community College • The largest community college in Ohio and among the largest in the nation. • ffers associate degrees in automotive technology, aviation maintenance, business O management, civil engineering, information technology, electro-mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and numerous other business and engineering fields. • ogistics – Attracting and Retaining Talent, a new program designed to train entry to L mid-level workers for the region’s logistics companies, with $4.6 million in federal funding. • Center for Workforce Development can provide customized training services for employers. THE COLUMBUS REGION 25
  26. 26. Colleges Universities No. College/University Enrollment 1 The Ohio State University 55,014 Columbus Region College/University Locations Columbus State Community 2 28,539 College 3 Franklin University 7,942 4 DeVry University 4,654 Marion 16 County 9 Central Ohio Technical 5 4,350 College - Newark Campus Knox 6 Capital University 3,540 County 17 7 Otterbein University 3,063 10 Logan 41 8 Ohio Dominican University 3,052 County 15 9 Marion Technical College 2,659 31 68 13 Mt. Vernon 10 2,622 11 Nazarene University 33 43 11 The Ohio State University - Newark 2,515 36 7 25 28 21 20 12 Ohio University - Lancaster 2,280 14 35 37 24 44 13 Denison University 2,267 29 8 42 30 32 27 Ashland University- 23 34 18 14 2,208 40 Columbus Center 22 26 38 15 Ohio Wesleyan 1,893 16 The Ohio State University - Marion 1,828 39 17 Kenyon College 1,633 12 Columbus College of 18 1,425 Art Design 19 19 Ohio Christian University 1,117 20 ITT Technical Institute 850 21 Hondros College 847 Mount Carmel College 22 782 of Nursing Chamberlain College 23 777 of Nursing 24 Bradford School 657 Mount Vernon Nazarene 25 548 University - Columbus 26 Kaplan College - Columbus Campus 527 27 Park University - DSCC 520 No. College/University Enrollment Fortis College (formerly 36 Pontifical College Josephinum 137 28 486 Bohecker College) 37 National College 106 29 Central Michigan University 450 38 Harrison College 99 30 Miami-Jacobs Career College 394 39 Daymar College 67 Methodist Theological School 31 227 Bexley Hall Episcopal in Ohio 40 17 Seminary Kent State University - Central Ohio Technical College - 32 School of Library 200 41 - Knox Campus* Information Science Central Ohio Technical University of Phoenix - 42 - 33 176 College - Pataskala Campus* Columbus Campus Strayer University - 34 Trinity Lutheran Seminary 151 43 - Columbus* 35 Ohio Business College 148 44 Indiana Wesleyan -*School currently in operation, but no enrollment reported in Fall 2010.Source: National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education, Columbus Business First Book Lists, 2010 THE COLUMBUS REGION 26

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