State Of U V2

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State Of U V2

  1. 2. Stigma <ul><li>What is stigma? </li></ul><ul><li>What is normal? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we view people who are different than us? </li></ul><ul><li>People judge those with mental illness. </li></ul><ul><li>How does TV portray those with mental illness? </li></ul><ul><li>Rejections, exclusions, hurt feelings arise from stigma. What else? </li></ul><ul><li>Stigma creates feelings of not wanting to seek help because fear of what people think. </li></ul>This is the actual clip art that appears when you search for “crazy”
  2. 3. Watch Video I here You will be taken to a new window. Close the video window after viewing to return to this presentation.
  3. 4. Video I: Discussion <ul><li>What do you see? </li></ul><ul><li>How does he see himself? </li></ul><ul><li>What stigma is going on here? </li></ul><ul><li>Other things? </li></ul>
  4. 5. Mental Health vs. Mental Illness <ul><li>Mental Health </li></ul><ul><li>Mental Illness </li></ul><ul><li>“ Normal” </li></ul><ul><li>Wellness </li></ul><ul><li>Sane </li></ul><ul><li>Independent </li></ul><ul><li>What Else? </li></ul><ul><li>What does a mentally healthy person look like? </li></ul><ul><li>“ Abnormal” </li></ul><ul><li>Sickness </li></ul><ul><li>Crazy </li></ul><ul><li>Needs Help </li></ul><ul><li>What Else? </li></ul><ul><li>What does a person with a mental illness look like? </li></ul>
  5. 6. Thinking Feeling Acting
  6. 7. Watch Video II here You will be taken to a new window. Close the video window after viewing to return to this presentation.
  7. 8. Video II: Discussion <ul><li>What do you see? </li></ul><ul><li>What is he thinking? </li></ul><ul><li>How is he feeling? </li></ul><ul><li>What are his behaviors? </li></ul><ul><li>How does he see himself? </li></ul><ul><li>What stigma is going on here? </li></ul><ul><li>Other things? </li></ul>
  8. 9. The Domino Effect
  9. 10. Create Your Own
  10. 11. Watch Video III here You will be taken to a new window. Close the video window after viewing to return to this presentation.
  11. 12. Video III: Discussion <ul><li>What do you see? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the areas of her life that are being affected? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In what ways? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What stigma is going on here? </li></ul><ul><li>Other things? </li></ul>
  12. 13. Myths of Mental Illness <ul><li>I should be able to handle my mental health issues. </li></ul><ul><li>Mental illness makes me weak, is something I created, and is all my fault. </li></ul><ul><li>People will think I am crazy if I get help from a professional. </li></ul><ul><li>I can tell if someone has a mental illness – they look like they do. </li></ul><ul><li>People think I am dangerous or violent because of my mental illness. </li></ul><ul><li>People think that just because I have a mental illness that I have been hospitalized, put in an insane asylum, or am homeless. </li></ul><ul><li>I was told that if I try hard enough, my mental illness will go away. I am just too weak to help myself. </li></ul><ul><li>Some problems are just a part of growing up. Depression, anxiety, etc. in children and adolescents is not a mental illness – it is just growing up. </li></ul><ul><li>People who talk about killing themselves rarely commit suicide. </li></ul><ul><li>I don’t want to ask someone if they are suicidal, that might just put the thought into their head. </li></ul><ul><li>Mental illness can’t affect me. </li></ul>
  13. 14. Here are the Facts! <ul><li>Some mental health problems (e.g., mild anxiety, depression, etc.) can be addressed with self-help, living a wellness lifestyle, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Similar to medical conditions, mental illness is not one’s fault! </li></ul><ul><li>People do not choose to have a mental illness. </li></ul><ul><li>People should not be embarrassed or shameful of their mental illness, just like they should not have such feelings resulting from any other medical condition. </li></ul><ul><li>Just like a medical condition, people need to seek treatment in order to get better. </li></ul><ul><li>The earlier the treatment the better. </li></ul><ul><li>Seeking help is a sign of strength – not weakness. </li></ul><ul><li>Many individuals live with a mental illness without anyone knowing it. </li></ul><ul><li>Many people with a mental illness lead productive lives. </li></ul><ul><li>More… </li></ul>
  14. 15. Here are the Facts! Cont… <ul><li>The rate of violence and dangerous behaviors among those with mental illness is not much different from the general population. </li></ul><ul><li>Over two-thirds of Americans with a mental illness live independent lives, in communities, and are productive contributors to society. </li></ul><ul><li>Only a small portion of people with mental illness are hospitalized; those who are typically are there for a short period of time. </li></ul><ul><li>Most mental illnesses cannot be willed away; no matter how hard one tries. </li></ul><ul><li>1 in 10 children and adolescents have a mental illness in the USA. </li></ul><ul><li>Most people who commit suicide have given some verbal clue or warning of their intentions. </li></ul><ul><li>Asking someone directly about suicidal intent will often lower anxiety and act as a deterrent to suicidal behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>Mental illness is very common. Almost every family in the USA has been affected by mental illness. </li></ul>
  15. 16. Watch Video IV here You will be taken to a new window. Close the video window after viewing to return to this presentation.
  16. 17. Video IV: Discussion <ul><li>What do you see? </li></ul><ul><li>What is she thinking? </li></ul><ul><li>How is she feeling? </li></ul><ul><li>What are her behaviors? </li></ul><ul><li>How does she see herself? </li></ul><ul><li>What about suicide? </li></ul><ul><li>How is she taking care of herself? </li></ul><ul><li>Other things? </li></ul>
  17. 18. What do I do to Help? <ul><li>Become involved in their tone of voice and expression of feelings. </li></ul><ul><li>Be non-judgmental. </li></ul><ul><li>Allow them to talk and fully express their feelings. </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid raising false hopes. </li></ul><ul><li>Let them make and take responsibility for their own decisions, actions and feelings. </li></ul><ul><li>Be empathic! </li></ul>Contents modified from McGlothlin, J. (2008). Developing clinical skills in suicide assessment, prevention, and treatment, Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Assoc.
  18. 19. What do I do to Help? <ul><li>Divide problems into parts so that the overall problem is not overwhelming. </li></ul><ul><li>Find out how they dealt with problems in the past. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on the present. </li></ul><ul><li>Take appropriate action. </li></ul><ul><li>Follow up! </li></ul>Contents modified from McGlothlin, J. (2008). Developing clinical skills in suicide assessment, prevention, and treatment, Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Assoc.
  19. 20. What might be some helpful… <ul><li>… ways to approach someone initially? </li></ul><ul><li>… words to say? </li></ul><ul><li>… behaviors? </li></ul><ul><li>… actions? </li></ul>
  20. 21. Watch Video V here You will be taken to a new window. Close the video window after viewing to return to this presentation.
  21. 22. Video V: Discussion <ul><li>What do you see? </li></ul><ul><li>What is she thinking? </li></ul><ul><li>How is she feeling? </li></ul><ul><li>What are her behaviors? </li></ul><ul><li>How is she getting help? </li></ul><ul><li>How could you help her? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How would you approach her? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Other things? </li></ul>
  22. 23. <ul><li>Who Can Help? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Informal Help </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hotlines </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Professional Help </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Campus Help </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Where Can I Find Help? </li></ul>
  23. 24. Creating a Resource Tree <ul><li>Internal Resources: 5 Things you can do on your own with out anyone’s help </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Prioritize this list </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be creative </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Personalize it </li></ul></ul><ul><li>External Resources: 5 People to contact </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Prioritize this list </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>People are list appropriate for the situation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>You can have multiple trees </li></ul>
  24. 25. Situation: ______________________________________________________________
  25. 26. Watch Video VI here You will be taken to a new window. Close the video window after viewing to return to this presentation.
  26. 27. Video VI: Discussion <ul><li>What do you see? </li></ul><ul><li>What is she thinking? </li></ul><ul><li>How is she feeling? </li></ul><ul><li>What are her behaviors? </li></ul><ul><li>Informal Help? </li></ul><ul><li>Hotlines? </li></ul><ul><li>Professional Help? </li></ul><ul><li>Campus Help? </li></ul><ul><li>Other things? </li></ul>
  27. 28. Credits…. <ul><li>Note: Actors are used in this curriculum to portray individuals with varying degrees of mental health issues. Such actors have training and experience in the mental health profession. </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum Developer: Jason McGlothlin, Ph.D., PCC-S, Associate Professor, </li></ul><ul><li>Kent State University </li></ul><ul><li>Actor in Video I: Nyema Bedell </li></ul><ul><li>Actor in Video II: Chad Yates </li></ul><ul><li>Actor in Video III: Terra Howell </li></ul><ul><li>Actor in Video IV: LeAnn Motley </li></ul><ul><li>Actor in Video V: Nicole Bradley </li></ul><ul><li>Actor in Video VI: Kelsey George </li></ul>
  28. 29. The End Please fill out this brief survey.

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