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CLIPFLAIR Foreign Language Learning Through Interactive Revoicing and 
Captioning of Clips 
LIFELONG LEARNING PROGRAMME - KEY ACTIVITY 2 
LANGUAGES, MULTILATERAL PROJECT 
519085-LLP-1-2011-1-ES-KA2-KA2MP 
D5.1 
ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
WP No. WP5 
WP Title Pilot use of the produced activities by FL learners (final) 
Activity description 
This deliverable records the findings from the final stage of 
the pilot use of the project outputs (academic year 2013-14). 
They will be used as source material for the final evaluation 
report. 
End users: project members 
Authors 
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB): Lupe Romero, 
Helena Casas-Tost, Anabel Galán-Mañas, Lucía Molina, 
Patricia Rodríguez-Inés, Sara Rovira, Olga Torres-Hostench 
Status (D: draft; RD: revised 
draft; F: final) F 
File Name D5.1.PilotUseReport.doc 
Date 15 July 2014 
July 2014 Page | 1
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report (final stage) 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
This deliverable records the findings from the final stage of the pilot use of the project 
outputs (academic year 2013-14). They will be used as source material for the final 
evaluation report. This document includes: 
• Details on the organization of the final pilot test (general information on the 
test, sample information, questionnaires, etc.) 
• Teachers’ results 
• Students’ results 
• Conclusions from the pilot test and suggestions for improvement 
• Results by universities 
July 2014 Page | 2
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Table of Contents 
1 ORGANIZATION OF THE PILOT USE OF THE PLATFORM.............................................. 7 
1.1 The questionnaire for the teacher............................................................................................. 8 
1.2 The questionnaire for the student............................................................................................. 8 
2 RESULTS.............................................................................................................. 10 
2.1 Description ............................................................................................................................ 10 
2.1.1 Universities ................................................................................................................... 10 
2.1.2 Teachers........................................................................................................................ 11 
2.1.3 Students........................................................................................................................ 11 
2.1.4 Languages ..................................................................................................................... 12 
2.1.5 Activities ....................................................................................................................... 12 
2.2 Teachers’ Results ................................................................................................................... 12 
2.2.1 Results regarding the activities........................................................................................ 12 
2.2.2 Results regarding the technical problems......................................................................... 15 
2.3 Students’ results .................................................................................................................... 16 
2.3.1 Overall results................................................................................................................ 16 
2.3.2 Students’ Profile ............................................................................................................ 16 
2.3.3 About ClipFlair activities ................................................................................................. 25 
2.3.4 About ClipFlair Studio..................................................................................................... 26 
2.3.5 About the ClipFlair web application ................................................................................. 27 
2.3.6 About the ClipFlair social network ................................................................................... 28 
2.4 Pilot use by university ............................................................................................................ 32 
2.4.1 Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB)....................................................................... 32 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
2.4.2 Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF) ..................................................................................... 36 
2.4.3 Imperial College London (ICL) and University College London (UCL) ................................... 41 
2.4.4 Universitatea „Babeș-Bolyai”, Cluj-Napoca, Romania (UBB)............................................... 44 
2.4.5 University of Deusto....................................................................................................... 49 
2.4.6 University of Tallinn ....................................................................................................... 52 
2.4.7 University of Warsaw ..................................................................................................... 55 
2.4.8 National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI Galway)......................................................... 61 
3 COMPARISON BETWEEN PILOT PHASES.................................................................. 65 
3.1 Participating Institutions ........................................................................................................ 65 
3.2 Participants ........................................................................................................................... 65 
3.3 Activities................................................................................................................................ 65 
3.4 Teachers' results .................................................................................................................... 66 
3.5 Students' results .................................................................................................................... 66 
APPENDIX 1. Teachers’ questionnaire .................................................................................................. 67 
APPENDIX 2. Students’ questionnaire................................................................................................... 70 
APPENDIX 3. Pictures from piloted activities......................................................................................... 74 
APPENDIX 4: Reminder sent to students via email ................................................................................ 75 
List of Tables 
Table 1. Summary of piloted activities…………………………………………………………………………………12 
Table 2. Summary of UAB team work……………………………………………………………………………35 
Table 3. Summary of teachers involved in the piloting at UAB………………………………………..36 
July 2014 Page | 4
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
List of Figures 
Figure 1. Where did students do the activity? ............................................................. 13 
Figure 2. Where did students perform the activity? [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot 
test)] 14 
Figure 3. How often teachers use audiovisual materials ............................................... 14 
Figure 4. How often do you use other kinds of audiovisual activities in this course? 
[Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)]..................................................................... 15 
Figure 5. Students’ native languages .......................................................................... 17 
Figure 6. Students’ native languages [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)]............. 17 
Figure 7. Students’ gender ........................................................................................ 18 
Figure 8. Students’ age group.................................................................................... 18 
Figure 9. Students’ current place of study................................................................... 19 
Figure 10. Students’ current place of study [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)].. 19 
Figure 11. Completed studies................................................................................... 20 
Figure 12. Completed studies [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)] ..................... 20 
Figure 13. Activity language proficiency level............................................................. 21 
Figure 14. Previous use of multimedia in language lessons ......................................... 22 
Figure 15. Like/Dislike the use of audiovisual material................................................ 22 
Figure 16. Like/Dislike working with computers ......................................................... 23 
Figure 17. Reasons for not having completed the activity ........................................... 24 
Figure 18. Usefulness of ClipFlair activity for language learning ................................... 25 
Figure 19. Technical problems.................................................................................. 26 
July 2014 Page | 5
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Figure 20. Main types of technical problems ............................................................. 27 
Figure 21. About the ClipFlair web application........................................................... 28 
Figure 22. Use of ClipFlair social network .................................................................. 28 
Figure 23. Piloting at IES Esteve Terradas .................................................................. 34 
Figure 24. Use of ClipFlair social network .................................................................. 35 
July 2014 Page | 6
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
1 ORGANIZATION OF THE PILOT USE OF THE 
PLATFORM 
The UAB partner established the procedure for the final pilot test in coordination with 
the Project Managers at UPF. The procedure consisted of the following steps: 
• Developing the instructions to fill out the questionnaires. 
• Controlling the development of the pilot phase. 
• Analysing the results from the questionnaires. 
The pilot procedure was shared with the rest of project partners. Questions and 
comments regarding the pilot phase were posted and answered in the project 
management tool. The instructions to be followed by all partners during the pilot 
phase were the following: 
1. All partners should use the following forms after the piloting of each activity. Both 
forms are also available in the Documents area of Redmine. 
a. Learner feedback form: 
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1oqBPyNDwVBEK33MwmSeNXEiBthjG5UdYHwJL 
FTUphmo/viewform 
b. Pilot test information form to be filled in by the 
teacher: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1km6wmBgQczBehgZYyLhUGeXshF21Ekx 
-8waeDDW3ACE/viewform 
3. The deadline to pilot the activities and to submit both questionnaires is 17th May 
2014. 
4. You might need to translate the learner feedback form. In that case we will make a 
copy of the form and give you rights to edit it and translate it. Then we will merge all 
results in the same Excel file. 
5. The UAB team will collect all the data from the submitted questionnaires and will 
post it in Redmine as an Excel file. 
6. All partners should check their data in Redmine and translate into English those 
answers in languages different from English before 30th May. 
7. Partners are kindly asked to post on Redmine team pictures from their piloting 
experience. 
July 2014 Page | 7
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
8. The UAB team will write the final pilot test report to be discussed in Barcelona’s 
final meeting (June 2014). 
The UAB Team encouraged project partners to participate in the pilot phase and, in 
due time, reminded them of the deadline. Results from students and teachers 
participating in the pilot phase were recorded in a GoogleDocs file. After deadline on 
17th May the UAB team started analyzing the results in order to prepare this report. 
It has to be noted that not all users of the platform filled in the questionnaire. The 
complete and detailed pilot use by partner can be seen in section “ Pilot use by 
university” page 32 
1.1 The questionnaire for the teacher 
A form to be filled in by every teacher after piloting one of his/her own activities was 
originally designed by the UAB team and later agreed upon with several other 
partners. The form consisted of three blocks (see Appendix 1). 
The first block included teacher’s data, such as name and surname, e-mail address 
and centre affiliation. 
The second block focused on activity data, such as the title of the piloted activity 
(identified by the URL link) and a question about the time students needed to 
complete the activity. 
The last block aimed to gather detailed information about the context where the 
activity was piloted, such as the course, the learning environment (in class with the 
teacher, in a lab without teacher supervision, or at home), number of students, how 
often the teacher uses other types of audiovisual activities in his/her course). 
A box was available for teachers to comment on any technical problems experienced 
or any other aspect that could be useful as feedback. 
1.2 The questionnaire for the student 
The questionnaire to be filled in by students is divided into four blocks (see Appendix 
2). 
The first one, Pilot study data, collects three basic data: 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
(1) the centre in which the activity was performed; 
(2) the name of the teacher who piloted the activity; 
(3) whether the student completed the activity or not. A negative answer to the last 
question would not allow the student to fill in the questionnaire of the activity, but led 
him/her to a window with possible reasons for not having finished the activity. The 
rationale behind these items (I didn't have time, It was too complicated, I had 
technical problems, I did not like the video, I don't like computers, I didn't understand 
what I had to do, I don't feel comfortable recording my voice) was to provide data on 
both the activity and the platform. 
The second block, About the ClipFlair Activity, aims to describe the learner 
experience with the activity. Therefore, the most important item within this part is 
“The activity was…interesting, fun, useful for language learning, useful for improving 
my competence in translation, easy, had clear instructions, I would like to do more 
activities like the one I did”. Students choose their answers from an ordinary scale 
(Not at all, No, More or less, Yes, Very much). This block also includes an item 
regarding technical problems. 
The third block, About the ClipFlair Studio, seeks to show the learner experience with 
the web application. It consists of two questions, one related to the platform and the 
other to the social network. The first question crosses opinions (The ClipFlair Studio 
is user-friendly, The interface is attractive, On the whole, I enjoyed the ClipFlair 
experience) with an ordinary scale (Not at all, No, More or less, Yes, Very much). 
The second question is “Did you use the ClipFlair Social Network?” and the possible 
answers are Yes or Not. At the end of this part students can also add their 
comments. 
The fourth and last block is About the learner. It collects personal data (country of 
origin, native language, gender, age, centre where he/she is studying, his/her 
proficiency level in the language of the activity), and data about the learner’s 
experience with audiovisual materials (I like working with clips and audiovisual 
material to learn foreign languages, I like working with computers). 
July 2014 Page | 9
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
2 RESULTS 
2.1 Description 
2.1.1 Universities 
A total of 20 academic centres have participated in both pilot tests: 7 ClipFlair 
Partners and 13 associate partners. From those, 13 are universities and 7 non-university 
centres. In first pilot test, 8 universities participated: 6 ClipFlair partners 
and 2 associate partners (also universities). 
Partner Universities Associate partners 
ClipFlair P3. UAB, Barcelona (Spain) 
ClipFlair P5. UBBCLUJ, Cluj (Romania) 
ClipFlair P7. TLU, Tallinn (Estonia) 
ClipFlair P10. NUI, Galway (Ireland) 
ClipFlair. Algarve (Portugal) 
ClipFlair. Deusto (Spain) 
ClipFlair. UCL (UK) 
UNED, Madrid (Spain) 
HOU, Athens (Greece) 
Polygyros School (Greece) 
University of Leeds (UK) 
IES Esteve Terradas 
Kurutziaga Ikastola 
Lawdale Primary School 
Private Lessons at Worksite 
Warsaw University of Technology 
University of Pavia 
Mercy College, Sligo 
Kazimierz Wielki University 
EUROPASS Centro Studi Europeo 
July 2014 Page | 10
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
2.1.2 Teachers 
A total of 37 different teachers have taken part in the piloting of activities (12 in the 
first pilot test). Some of these teachers have piloted activities with groups from other 
teachers, disseminating the platform to teachers not involved in the project. The rest 
of teachers are active members of the ClipFlair project. 
2.1.3 Students 
A total of 1219 student questionnaires (318 in the first pilot test) were answered by 
students during the pilot phase. A total of 84 different ClipFlair activities were done. 
There are 23 questionnaires that cannot be related to a particular activity due to 
missing data. 
Centre Learners Teachers 
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain 433 9 
University Babes Bolyai, Romania 394 7 
Tallinn University, Estonia 38 3 
National University of Ireland, Galway 54 6 
Imperial College London, UK 21 2 
University of Leeds, UK 11 1 
Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, 
41 1 
Spain 
Hellenic Open University, Greece 24 1 
First Primary School of Polygyros, Greece 18 1 
University College London, UK 7 1 
Universidad de Deusto, Spain 11 1 
University of Algarve, Portugal 16 1 
July 2014 Page | 11
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain 44 2 
Other Secondary Education and Adult Learning 
107 5 
Institutions: 
(Institut Esteve Terradas, Warsaw University of 
Technology, Università di Pavia, Europass Centro 
Studi Europeo, Mercy College, Kurutziaga Ikastola) 
TOTAL 1,219 41 
Table 1. Summary of completed questionnaires 
2.1.4 Languages 
Twelve different languages have been used in the final pilot test (as opposed to 7 
languages in the first pilot test): English, Portuguese, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, 
Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Basque, Irish, Estonian and Italian. 20.7% of activities in 
the ClipFlair Gallery were designed to practice English and around 13.8% of activities 
to practice non-EU languages: Chinese, Japanese and Arabic. From the 
questionnaires provided by teachers we know that there is a small proportion of 
activities (13%) designed to practice translation with different language combination. 
2.1.5 Activities 
In total, 84 activities have been piloted. 
2.2 Teachers’ Results 
This section presents the results collected using the teacher’s feedback form known 
as Pilot use information (see Appendix 1). This form had to be filled in by every 
teacher after piloting one of his/her own activities. It includes the results received until 
the 17th May, which was the deadline for the activity pilot phase. Below is a summary 
of where the students carried out the piloted activity, how often the teacher used 
other kinds of audiovisual activities in his/her course, and a classification by 
categories of the technical problems reported by teachers. A total of 25 teachers 
answered the teacher’s form. 
2.2.1 Results regarding the activities 
Where did students perform the activity? 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Most activities were piloted in class together with the teacher; only 30% of them were 
piloted without teacher supervision, either in a language lab or at home. 
Some of the activities were done in class with the teacher, but students did not have 
enough time to fill in the feedback questionnaire and were asked to do it at home. 
This may be the reason why not all students filled in the questionnaire. 
Where did students do the activity? 
70% 
24% 
6% 
In class with the teacher 
At home 
In a lab without teacher 
supervision 
Figure 1. Where did students do the activity? 
In order to be able to compare total results with first pilot results, see below the 
results from the first pilot test: 
July 2014 Page | 13
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Figure 2. Where did students perform the activity? [Source: 
Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)] 
Length of activity 
The length of activities ranged from less than 5 minutes to more than 30 minutes, 
except for two activities that were done at home and the teacher did not know how 
long students took to do it. 
How often do you use other kinds of audiovisual activities in this course? 
Only around 25% of the teachers involved in the piloting phase use audiovisual 
materials often or very often, while most use them every now and then or seldom. 
How often teachers use audiovisual 
materials 
43% 
11% 
19% 
Seldom (once every two 
months or less) 
Now and then (once 
every 2-4 weeks) 
Never 
Often (once a week) 
Very often (more than 
once a week) 
Figure 3. How often teachers use audiovisual materials 
13% 
14% 
Notice that some teachers that never use audiovisual materials (14%) and have 
decided to use ClipFlair in the second pilot test, which is good news. In the first pilot 
test, more teachers were used to audiovisual materials in class (see below): 
July 2014 Page | 14
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Figure 4. How often do you use other kinds of audiovisual 
activities in this course? [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)] 
2.2.2 Results regarding the technical problems 
As far as technical problems experienced during the second pilot phase is 
concerned, teachers reported technical problems in only 23% of the cases, slightly 
lower than in the preliminary pilot test (26%). Most technical problems during second 
pilot test were not due to ClipFlair but to other causes, such as: 
“Some students had problems with Silverlight” 
“A bit of buffering at the video, but the internet connexion was slow” 
“Students experienced problems using University PCs (Windows xp) and their 
laptops (Windows 7 and 8)” 
Concerning audio, teachers reported the following technical problems: 
“One revoicing was extremely low (mic was working properly), another one recorded 
student's voice over original audio without and one could hear both voices. In another 
case, sentences were clipped (recordings seemed to be incomplete).” 
“Initially, but due to the way the sound was organized in that particular lab. Once the 
proper programmes were activate, everything worked very well.” 
“They had problems trying to record their voices” 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
“Students complained about the fact that they cannot see how long their recordings 
are. In addition, when students pause the video to listen to their recordings, their 
recordings keep going on and cannot be paused.” 
“Revoicing didn't work properly. Students' voices were mixed with the original 
soundtrack so that both English and Italian audio could be heard.” 
Concerning captions, one teacher reported that “*It'd be good if the platform allowed 
the teacher to set a maximum number of characters allowed per subtitle”, and 
actually, the program allows to mark a maximum number of characters. 
It is worth mentioning that in Ireland, for the ClipFlair website to become accessible 
to secondary school, a request had to be sent to the National Teachers’ Council. The 
petition was sent and accepted. 
2.3 Students’ results 
2.3.1 Overall results 
In this section the results of the questionnaire filled out by students are presented: 
results about students’ profile; results about ClipFlair activities; results about ClipFlair 
Studio and results about the ClipFlair web application. 
2.3.2 Students’ Profile 
These data have been obtained from the Students’ Questionnaire (see Appendix 2). 
Although 1173 students participated in the pilot tests, only 1076 completed a ClipFlair 
activity. Thirty-seven teachers coming from 13 different universities were involved in 
the pilot studies: National University of Ireland (Galway), Universitat Autònoma de 
Barcelona and Universitatea Babeş-Bolyai, Tallinn University, Hellenic Open 
University, Algarve, Deusto, UCL, HOU, University of Leeds and UNED, plus non-university 
centres such as Polygyros, IES Esteve Terradas, Kurutziaga Ikastola, 
Lawdale Primary School, and Private Lessons at Worksite. 
The students participating in the pilot tests came from 30 different countries. Most of 
them come from European countries (98%), although there are respondents from 
Africa, America, Asia and Australia. Among all the students, 65% said they have a 
July 2014 Page | 16
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
single mother tongue; 16% considered him/herself bilingual and 19% trilingual. 
Compared to the preliminary pilot test, many more students considered themselves 
to be bilingual and trilingual. 
Native speaker of 
65% 
1 language 
2 languages 
3 languages 
Figure 5. Students’ native languages 
16% 
19% 
Notice differences between final results and first pilot test below: 
Native speaker of 
89% 
9% 2% 
One 
language 
Figure 6. Students’ native languages [Source: Deliverable 1136 
(first pilot test)] 
Regarding gender, the vast majority, 75%, are women, just 3% less than in the 
preliminary pilot test. 
July 2014 Page | 17
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
75% 
Figure 7. Students’ gender 
Regarding age, the vast majority of students, 74%, belong to the age group between 
18 and 35. The group aged between 13 and 18 represents 13%, the group aged 
under 13 represents 10% and the group aged over 35 represents the remaining 3%. 
Compared to the first pilot test, there are considerable less students in the age group 
between 18 and 35 (from 93% to 74%) and there has been an increase in the age 
groups below 18 years old, while the group above 35 has remained more or less 
steady. 
Figure 8. Students’ age group 
25% 
Gender 
Female 
Male 
74% 
13% 
10% 
3% 
Age group 
18 - 35 years old 
13 - 18 years old 
< 13 years old 
> 35 years old 
July 2014 Page | 18
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
In the item “I am a student at”, the answer "University" was the most popular (77%), 
which is probably the case because most of the activities were piloted by teachers 
from universities involved in the ClipFlair project. 
I am a student at 
Figure 9. Students’ current place of study 
These results can be compared with those of first pilot test: 
Figure 10. Students’ current place of study [Source: Deliverable 
1136 (first pilot test)] 
77% 
18% 
4% 1% 
University 
Secondary School 
Other 
Language School 
0,35 0,35 
99,31 
Student of 
Language 
school 
Secondary 
school 
University 
July 2014 Page | 19
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
The fact that almost all the students who participated in the pilot test were currently 
pursuing studies at university conditions the results from another item: “Level of 
Studies completed”. More than half of the students, 60%, answered “school”, while 
another significant percentage of the students, 27%, stated they hold a university 
degree. We assume that they are currently pursuing their second or third university 
degree. 
Figure 11. Completed studies 
3% 2% 
These results can be compared with those of first pilot test: 
Figure 12. Completed studies [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot 
test)] 
60% 
27% 
8% 
Level of studies 
School 
University degree 
Other 
Post-graduate (MA, PhD) 
Vocational Training 
37% 
4% 
3% 
48% 
8% 
Level of studies 
University 
degree 
Post-graduate 
(MA, PhD) 
Vocational 
Training 
July 2014 Page | 20
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
The item “Proficiency level in the language of the activity” shows that most 
participating students rated their knowledge of the language as upper intermediate 
(4) or intermediate (3). 
Proficiency level in the language of 
the activity 
10% 
14% 
22% 
28% 26% 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
Figure 13. Activity language proficiency level 
The questionnaire includes three questions inquiring about the students’ familiarity 
with using audiovisual material and interest in the technical and pedagogical 
environment of ClipFlair activities: computer and clips. 
It should be noted that nearly a quarter of the students rated “I have used video or 
multimedia as a language student before doing any ClipFlair Activity” with the lowest 
score. 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
I have used video or multimedia as a 
language student before doing any 
ClipFlair Activity 
22% 
15% 
13% 
29% 
21% 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
Figure 14. Previous use of multimedia in language lessons 
In contrast, 75% of the students responded very positively to the statement “I like 
working with clips and audiovisual material to learn foreign languages”, scoring 4 or 5 
out of 5. 
I like working with clips and 
audiovisual material to learn foreign 
languages 
3% 
5% 
17% 
33% 
42% 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
Figure 15. Like/Dislike the use of audiovisual material 
July 2014 Page | 22
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
The same positive result can be observed in relation to the last statement, “I like 
working with computers”. 
I like working with computers 
3% 
5% 
15% 
33% 
44% 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
Figure 16. Like/Dislike working with computers 
Finally, the reasons provided by students who did not finish their activity are 
displayed below. It can be observed that the vast majority, 76%, argues lack of time. 
We think that this “lack of time” is probably related to the novelty that the ClipFlair 
environment represents for the student. Probably, if the student were familiar with the 
platform, he/she would have been faster. 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
I did not complete the ClipFlair 
activity because 
76% 
1% 
Figure 17. Reasons for not having completed the activity 
2% 
6% 
2% 
2% 
2% 
2% 
2% 
2% 
1% 
1% 
1% 
0% 
I didn't have time 
I had technical 
problems 
It was too complicated, 
I didn't understand 
what I had to do 
I didn't have time, I 
don't feel comfortable 
recording my voice 
It was too complicated 
I didn't have time, I 
had technical problems 
It was too complicated, 
I didn't understand 
what I had to do, I 
don't feel comfortable 
Ir edcidonrd'ti nugn dmeyr svtoaincde 
what I had to do 
July 2014 Page | 24
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
2.3.3 About ClipFlair activities 
Over 80% of students answered “yes” or “very much” to the statements “The activity 
was useful for language learning” and “The activity was useful for improving my 
competence in translation”. In addition, over 60% considered that the instructions 
were clear. According to this, it can be said that the answers that got best results are 
those related to the pedagogical usefulness of ClipFlair activities. 
Figure 18. Usefulness of ClipFlair activity for language learning 
600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 
0 
Yes 
Yes, very much so 
More or less 
No 
Not at all 
July 2014 Page | 25
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
2.3.4 About ClipFlair Studio 
Over 80% of students had no technical difficulties in the second phase of the piloting 
of the platform as shown in the questionnaires filled in by students during 2014. Even 
though the figures are similar to those in the first phase, most of the problems 
pointed out in the interim report have already been solved. It is important to highlight 
that some technical problems were experienced by just one user and were related to 
rather personal circumstances (e.g. their PC at home, their Internet connection). 
I had technical problems 
No 
Yes (please specify in the 
next question) 
Figure 19. Technical problems 
83% 
17% 
It is to be highlighted that several problems mentioned in the interim report have 
been solved satisfactorily and are not mentioned anymore. These problems are the 
loading of videos and compatibility of the system with the computer, as well as the 
fact that, in captions, it was not possible to write from right to left, as in Arabic. 
Additionally, 13 users said that they had experienced technical problems but never 
specified of what type. 
July 2014 Page | 26
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Main types of technical problems 
The audio The captions The synchronisation The video 
28% 
14% 
23% 
35% 
Figure 20. Main types of technical problems 
2.3.5 About the ClipFlair web application 
Generally speaking, the three web application-related items included in the 
questionnaire have had positive answers. In the first item, “The ClipFlair Studio is 
user-friendly”, almost 80% of students have answered “yes” or “very much so”. In the 
second, “The interface is attractive”, the response has been less enthusiastic, with 
“yes” and “more or less” rating almost the same. The third, which is a global question, 
“On the whole, I enjoyed the ClipFlair experience” has been rated highest if we take 
into account both answers “yes” and “very much so”. 
July 2014 Page | 27
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Figure 21. About the ClipFlair web application 
700 
600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 
2.3.6 About the ClipFlair social network 
Figure 18 below shows that almost half of the students (46%) used the ClipFlair 
social network facilities. Although the percentage is not very high, it increased a lot 
compared to the first pilot phase, when only 23% of students had used it. Lack of 
time when doing the activity and answering the questionnaire may be the cause of 
these results. 
Clipflair Social Network 
Figure 22. Use of ClipFlair social network 
0 
The Clipflair 
Studio is user-friendly 
The interface is 
atractive 
On the whole, I 
ejoyed Clipflair 
Yes 
Yes very much so 
More or less 
No 
Not at all 
54% 
46% 
No 
Yes 
July 2014 Page | 28
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
OBSERVATIONS 
Not all students provided observations in their questionnaires. However, some 
students gave valuable feedback for the partners. Below there is a summary: 
Suggestions for improvement 
Actions taken and situation by the end of 
from first pilot 2013 
project 
On the interface: 
 It is a bit unclear Solved 
 It is a bit blurry Solved 
 The resolution of the screen 
should be improved Non-ClipFlair related 
 The quality of the subtitles on 
the screen was not very good Solved 
 The zoom should be 
adjusted somehow because it 
zooms out of page, and the 
windows cannot be positioned 
freely Solved 
 The interface should be more 
"compact" Solved 
 The recording with the 
instructions about how to use 
ClipFlair are repeated, and they 
could be deleted Activity-related 
 The number of characters 
should be limited in captions, as 
in professional subtitling Added feature 
 It could be useful to save the 
project as a video file 
Elements can be saved separately and 
together 
 It should be possible to 
pause the video by pressing the 
space bar Pause button 
On technical problems: 
 Problems with recording 
audio and video Solved 
 Microphone should be 
checked beforehand Non-ClipFlair related 
 System needs to be adapted 
to allow for writing from right to 
left Added feature 
Some students also provided feedback to improve the design of activities and the 
overall learning experience: 
July 2014 Page | 29
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
1) “I think students could benefit with a demo in class before using it at home 
themselves. After I was shown it all made sense.” 
2) “Idea for activity: listening to the video without the captions” 
3) Difficulty:” trying to understand the exact words/tenses spoken” 
4) Difficulty: “recording the clips” 
5) Difficulty: “revoicing the clips in the time allowed was difficult & needed lots of 
practice.” 
6) Suggestion: ”I think a more detailed explanation of how to set up would help. Our 
tutor addressed this issue on our second on campus session and then all was fine.” 
7) Suggestion: “ClipFlair should be used to work with vocabulary in a more 
intensive manner” 
8) Suggestion: “activities should be more interesting” 
Positive students’ observations, exactly as they themselves wrote them, are 
presented below: 
POSITIVE OBSERVATIONS (First pilot First semester 2013) 
I'm using it for the first time at Chinese class. I find it very interesting, and for being 
in a beta stage it's very complete: It has so many features that give so many 
different exercise opportunities to make. I only would make the interface more 
"compact", but I like it. 
It is a fun way of improving your translations' skills. 
ClipFlair is an easy to use, yet really useful system. I especially liked the way in 
which it combines knowledge and learning with fun. I enjoyed using it, since it is 
something new for me. I will definitely use it again, since I find it interesting. 
I think it is a very useful and attractive activity, not only for students but for any 
speaker of foreign languages who would like to improve his/her knowledge. We all 
love movies, and the activity is so interesting that it could be done as a hobby too. 
I hoped for a bit more interesting exercises. 
In my opinion, the exercises which were proposed were very useful for the 
vocabulary enrichment, so I think it is very useful. 
This activity make you to learn different adjectives and practice your pronunciation. 
It´s very fun and useful for tourism´s students. 
This activity was more difficult than the another one about Edinburgh, because here 
you need to speak about senses and feelings and emotions more than only you 
need describe the images. But it´s was amazing. 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
In my opinion the web is very well structured. 
I think this is a very useful web, given the low number of available webs to learn 
languages currently 
It's an interesting activity and useful for improving your knowledge on this language. 
I think the most attractive aspect of this program is how easy it is to use it, and how 
it helps to discover new things about your language combination. 
POSITIVE OBSERVATIONS (Second pilot 2013-2014) 
I like the Clipflair application. 
I think the platform is a good learning tool. 
It was a very interesting and useful experience. 
ClipFlair Studio helped especially in the listening/audio section. 
I think this is an easy-to-use platform, very useful for students and teachers alike, I 
enjoyed working with it. 
I like watching videos and do practical exercises there. I think the exercises are very 
useful. 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
2.4 Pilot use by university 
2.4.1 Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) 
Summary of figures related to the Clipflair Project by UAB 
56 activities created 
25 activities piloted 
433 questionnaires 
395 questionnaires answered 
6 teachers involved in the creation of activities 
10 teachers involved in the piloting 
Table 2 Summary of UAB team work 
Apart from the six UAB teachers who are members of the Clipflair project (who have 
been in charge of creating and piloting activities), there have been four more 
teachers who have piloted our activities. Two of these teachers belong to the same 
institution (UAB) and the remaining two come from the secondary school IES Esteve 
Terradas. The following table summarizes these figures: 
Clipflair members UAB teachers 
Secondary school 
IES. Esteve Terradas 
Anabel Galán Maria Regina Dora Garde 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Clipflair members UAB teachers 
Secondary school 
IES. Esteve Terradas 
Saraiva Mendes 
Helena Casas Tost Xianghong Qu Francesca Ceres 
Lucía Molina 
Olga Torres Hostench 
Patricia Rodríguez-Inés 
Sara Rovira-Esteva 
Table 3. Teachers involved in the piloting at UAB 
IES Esteve Terradas published an entry on the piloting of Clipflair activities in their 
web page (see snapshot below). For more information click on the following 
link: http://www.esteveterradas.cat/index.php/noticies-ies-125/cicles-formatius/llenguees-estrangeres/ 
1082-el-projecte-clipflair-al-centre: 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Figure 23. Piloting at IES Esteve Terradas 
The activities created by the UAB team that have been piloted include the following 
foreign languages and language combinations, in the case of translation activities: 
120 
100 
80 
60 
40 
20 
0 
Arabic Chinese Portuguese translation 
English> 
Catalan 
Translation 
English> 
Spanish 
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Figure 24. Use of ClipFlair social network 
The UAB team has made wide use of the social part of the Clipflair platform. It has 
resulted in the creation of following groups, together with the amount of users of each 
one of them: 
• Iniciación a la traducción (31) 
• TB-A3 (23) 
• Traducción científico-técnica FTI (28) 
• Tradumatica UNIOR (15) 
• Tradumatica (29) 
• TAV Chinese-Spanish (UAB) (44) 
• TAV Lleida (4) 
• Learning Arabic (17) 
• Learning Chinese (7) 
Finally, the UAB team has contacted different authorities from the Education 
Department of the Catalan Government (Generalitat de Catalunya), who attended the 
Clipflair Conference: 
• Head of Primary and Secondary school: Neus Lorenzo 
• Head of Foreign Language Schools (EOI): Neus Figueres 
Below are some pictures of the piloting of activities at the UAB (see more pictures in 
appendix 3). 
July 2014 Page | 35
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
2.4.2 Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF) 
UPF Barcelona carried out its piloting activity in a university context but with groups from different 
undergraduate programs, collaborating in one project. 
Summary of figures related to the Clipflair Project by UPF 
2 activities created 
2 activities piloted 
35 questionnaires 
21 questionnaires answered 
2 teachers involved in the creation of activities 
2 teachers involved in the piloting 
Table 1 Summary of UPF team work 
The following UPF teachers have created and piloted the activities: 
UPF staff 
Elena Voellmer 
Rebecca Walter 
Table 2. Teachers involved in the piloting at UPF 
The activities created by the UPF team that have been piloted include the following foreign languages: 
English, German, (Spanish and Catalan). The piloting project was carried out April to June 2014. The 
July 2014 Page | 36
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
main questions of the research where; how can ClipFlair be implemented into a university context and 
iIs its implementation useful for the students. On a theoretical level, the activity tried to look at the 
competencies it could potentially foster and finally asked for the motivational component and on what 
students thought about the activity. The particularities of the project were the work with students from 
different undergraduate studies (Applied Languages and Translation Studies) and having one group 
translating between two foreign languages (L3 and L4 for most of the students). 
The UPF team used the social network of the Clipflair platform during the pilot lessons both for revoicing 
and captioning. The following groups were created: 
Group 1 Group 2 
Studies Applied Languages Translation 
Group profiles 2nd year, 24 students 
(in-course obligatory participation) 
3rd year, 11 students 
(voluntary participation) 
Language profiles Majority bilingual (ES/CAT) 
Learn several foreign languages 
Majority bilingual (ES/CAT) 
Learn several foreign languages 
Activities -Creating conversation in German 
(Written to be spoken: modal 
particles) 
-Subsequent revoicing 
(error correction) 
Translating German dialogue into 
English (Captioning) 
Competencies used -Plurilingual competence 
- Multiliteracy competence 
-Plurilingual competence 
-Multiliteracy competence 
Table 3. The two groups involved and their activities 
The overall responses to the use of ClipFlair were very positive. The UPF team could also detect some 
issues as on how to implement the tool and on how much “control” and observation by the teaching staff 
is required so they don’t give up due to technical problems. Below the results of some of the 
questionnaires, separated by groups: 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Below are screenshots of the two activities created on the ClipFlair platform: 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
2.4.3 Imperial College London (ICL) and University College London (UCL) 
ICL and UCL have carried out the piloting of activities in a variety of contexts: with 
undergraduate and postgraduate students, with primary and secondary school 
students, and with independent learners. However, it should be noted that we have 
encountered many issues to implement the piloting of activities as expected due to 
the transfer of the Translation Studies Unit from Imperial College London to 
University College London. As a result of the transfer, the team has not been able to 
rely on the support of language tutors teaching Arabic, Chinese, Portuguese and 
Japanese (who stayed at Imperial College London) to pilot activities. This is the main 
reason why most of the activities piloted by UCL are Spanish activities, as this was 
the language taught by members of staff who were transferred to UCL. The team 
attempted to involve tutors from the new institution for the piloting of activities, but 
this was not possible given the time frame, and given that teaching finished in March. 
As a result, an attempt has been made to involve independent learners, who have 
been mainly contacted through social media. 
The purpose of this section is to provide detailed information about the piloting 
activities carried out at UCL and with independent learners. Since the activities 
carried out at ICL have been included in the final report, these will not be discussed 
here. 
Piloting carried out by UCL 
Piloting activities with translation students at UCL 
On the 23rd of March 2014, Rocío Baños, from the UCL team, piloted the 
activity http://studio.clipflair.net/?activity=Friends_en_Rev_C1_ANY.clipflair with 30 
students of the MSc in Scientific, Technical and Medical Translation at UCL. The 
activity was integrated in the module Translating for Voiceover and Dubbing, where 
students translate a wide range of audiovisual material for the purposes of voiceover 
and dubbing. In this activity students were asked to translate the clip for dubbing, 
making sure the translated dialogues sounded natural and spontaneous, and then to 
revoice the dialogues to find out if their translation fitted in the space provided, and to 
make sure that it sounded natural. Students translated into a wide range of 
languages: Chinese, Spanish, Italian, Polish and Portuguese. 
The session lasted 2 hours, and the activity was introduced in the last 40 minutes. As 
there was not enough time for students to complete the task in class, they were 
asked to finish it at home, to post it on ClipFlair Social Network, and to complete the 
feedback form. No major issues were experienced during the piloting. There were 
only minor issues with the revoicing component (some fragments were recorded but 
could not be heard by students, and there was some overlapping between 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
fragments). These issues were reported after the session and looked into by the 
ClipFlair team in charge of the platform’s development. 
A couple of days after piloting the activity, a reminder was sent asking students to 
complete the activity and to fill in the feedback form (see Appendix 1). Since not 
many students filled in the feedback form, feedback was sought informally when 
meeting students in other lectures. Overall, students liked ClipFlair Studio and some 
of them even tried to complete other activities available in the Gallery. Both during 
and after the piloting session, some students mentioned that they were not 
comfortable listening to their own voice. Some mentioned they were not comfortable 
recording audio in class, but that they felt more at ease doing the recording at home. 
Piloting Spanish activities at Lawdale Junior School 
On the 23rd of May 2014, Marga Navarrete, from the UCL team, ran four sessions at 
Lawdale Junior School. Four different sessions were held: two with Y4 students (8-9 
years old kids) and two with Y5 students (9-10 years old kids). Each session was 
attended by about 28-30 pupils. 
Two different activities to learn Spanish, designed for primary school children were 
tested: http://studio.clipflair.net/?activity=Lucas_y_sus_hermanos_Cap-A1A2-SP.clipflair 
and http://studio.clipflair.net/?activity=Lucas_y_sus_hermanos_Rev-A1A2-SP.clipflair. 
The activities consisted of a short clip where an eight year-old boy was interviewed 
about personal information, family and leisure activities. Pupils really enjoyed the clip 
(because it was filmed in their local park and also because they could easily relate to 
the boy in the clip). In the first activity children had to complete the captions, and in 
the second, they had to dub the main character and change his responses with their 
own personal information. 
The first activity was very successful, most students managed to complete it, and 
there were no technical problems of any sort. Also, they found ClipFlair Studio easy 
to use and enjoyed writing the captions. However, when a group of pupils tried to test 
the second activity based on a revoicing task, problems arose, and none of the 
students managed to complete the activity successfully. The school borrowed the 
microphones from another school, and they had not tested them properly, the 
settings were slightly wrong, so most microphones did not work properly. Although 
pupils enjoyed the clip, and learnt a lot from it, not being able to complete their task 
was frustrating. 
Almost a hundred students tested these activities. However, there was not enough 
time to fill in the learner feedback. As it was an online form, some links had to be 
typed in and there were a lot of questions to be responded to in a very short period of 
time. For this reason, the teacher assistant and the UCL tutor piloting the activity 
July 2014 Page | 42
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
helped a few students to complete the form, but unfortunately, not as many as we 
would have liked to. 
Use of ClipFlair Social Network 
The UCL team has also made use of the social part of the Clipflair platform, mainly 
through the creation of the group MSc Translation UCL. 
Piloting with independent learners 
Independent learners were contacted both directly and through social media in order 
to be able to gather relevant feedback about the platform and about specific activities 
targeted at independent learners. UCL tutors were also encouraged to ask language 
learners to test some activities as independent learners. A key aspect raised 
informally by learners was obtaining support while carrying out the activity. Some 
learners found the available video tutorials and the manual useful, but others 
preferred to be able to access this material in their main language, an issue which 
has been addressed in the project. Another issue raised was obtaining feedback after 
completing the activity: leaners particularly appreciated being able to check a 
document with solutions or sample answers. Again, feedback from learners was 
frequently gathered informally, but some of the responses obtained during the last 
stages of the project are available in Appendix 2. 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
2.4.4 Universitatea „Babeș-Bolyai”, Cluj-Napoca, Romania (UBB) 
UBB Cluj-Napoca carried out its piloting activity in different contexts: high school 
students, university students, MA degree students, and professors. 
Summary of figures related to the Clipflair Project by UAB 
84 activities created 
30 activities piloted 
394 questionnaires 
394 questionnaires answered 
9 teachers involved in the creation of activities 
7 teachers involved in the piloting 
Table 2 Summary of UBB team work 
Apart from the nine UBB teachers who are members of the Clipflair project and have 
been in charge of creating and piloting activities, there have been four other high 
school teachers who have piloted our activities. Two of these teachers belong to the 
Colegiul Național „Emil Racoviță” (CNER); the others belong to Seminarul Teologic 
Ortodox (STO) and Liceul Teoretic „Mihai Eminescu” (LTME) Cluj-Napoca. The 
following table summarizes these figures: 
Clipflair members and UBB staff Secondary school teachers 
Cristina Varga Diana Todoran (CNER) 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Clipflair members and UBB staff Secondary school teachers 
Cristina Felea Irina Nădășan (LTME) 
Adriana Neagu Nicoleta Popa (STO) 
Liana Muthu 
Sanda Moraru 
Alexandra Cotoc 
Anamaria Radu 
Table 3. Teachers involved in the piloting at UBB 
The activities created by the UBB team that have been piloted include the following 
foreign languages: English, Spanish, Romanian, Catalan, Russian, and Ukrainian. 
The Russian pilot activities were postponed by Russian Language and Literature 
Department of UBB by October 2014 and will be carried out as soon as possible. 
One activity in Norwegian which is not published for the moment in the Clipflair 
gallery was also carried out because the Nordic Languages Department of UBB 
would like to involve Clipflair platform in a Norwegian learning project, they will 
submit by the end of 2014. 
July 2014 Page | 45
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Figure 1. Use of ClipFlair social network by UBB users 
Figure 2. Use of ClipFlair social network by college students in Cluj-Napoca 
The UBB team used the social network of the Clipflair platform during the pilot 
lessons especially for upload the activities of the students. It has resulted in the 
creation of following groups (the number of members for each group is also 
mentioned): 
• UBB (217); 
• Romanian; 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
• Ukrainian; 
• Russian; 
• English; 
• Spanish; 
• Catalan; 
• CNER (62); 
• STO (18); 
• Liceul Teorectic „Mihai Eminescu” (14); 
• NTLD2014 (18); 
Therefore, UBB users are organised in 5 main groups and 329 members. 
Finally, the UBB team has contacted different authorities: 
• Head of Russian Cultural Center in Cluj-Napoca: Iudith Bartalis; 
• Head of Liceul Teoretic “Mihai Eminescu”: Dobrescu Simona Raluca 
Below are some pictures of the piloting of activities at the UBB. Please find more on 
the Clipflair Social Network, group UBB. 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
2.4.5 University of Deusto 
The University of Deusto has collaborated with the Kurutziaga School of Durango to 
design and test activities. These activities have been developed in Basque. 
Kurutziaga school is an Associated Partner in ClipFlair project. 
Other activities have been piloted at the University of Deusto with students from 
“Euskal Irakaslegoa”, the Basque language school. Kurutziaga School students who 
participated in the pilot are in fifth and sixth grade, so they are under 13 years. 
Pilot data 
The following table shows the list of activities in Basque that have been tested, the 
number of learners who have tested each activity, the educational institution and the 
teacher responsible for each piloting activity. 
Title of activity (URL link) 
Number of 
Learners 
Center 
Teacher 
Responsible 
NOR NAIZ 
NI?: http://studio.clipflair.net/?activity= 
UD_euskera_nornaizni.clipflair 
9 
Kurutziaga 
School 
Gaizka Uriarte 
MARITEILETAKOAREN 
IPUINA: http://studio.clipflair.net/?activ 
ity=UD_euskera_mariteiletako.clipflair 
8 
Kurutziaga 
School 
Gaizka Uriarte 
GABONAK, OLENTZEROAREN 
KANTAK: http://studio.clipflair.net/?act 
ivity=Kurutziaga_euskera_gabonak.clipflai 
r 
6 
Kurutziaga 
School 
Gaizka Uriarte 
SURRANDIAK: http://studio.clipflair.ne 
t/?activity=Kurutziaga_euskera_Surrandia 
k.clipflair 
18 
Kurutziaga 
School 
Gaizka Uriarte 
ZEZENAK 
DIRA: http://studio.clipflair.net/?activity 
9 
Kurutziaga 
School 
Gaizka Uriarte 
July 2014 Page | 49
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
=Kurutziaga_euskera_zezenakdira.clipflair 
OLENTZEROREN 
ISTORIOA: http://studio.clipflair.net/?a 
ctivity=Kurutziaga_Olentzeroren_istorioa. 
clipflair 
1 
Kurutziaga 
School 
Gaizka Uriarte 
LAZKAO 
TXIKI: http://studio.clipflair.net/?activit 
y=Kurutziaga_euskera_Lazkao_txiki.clipfla 
ir 
10 
Kurutziaga 
School 
Gaizka Uriarte 
ITSUTUTA 
ABENTURA: http://studio.clipflair.net/ 
?activity=UD_euskera_itsututa.clipflair 
2 
Kurutziaga 
School 
Gaizka Uriarte 
BIZKAIAN TURISMOA 
EGITEN: http://studio.clipflair.net/?acti 
vity=UD_euskera_bizkaia.clipflair 
4 
University of 
Deusto 
Iratxe 
Mentxaka 
KUTSADURA: http://studio.clipflair.net 
/?activity=UD_euskera_bizkaia.clipflair 
5 
University of 
Deusto 
Iratxe 
Mentxaka 
Table 1: List of piloting activities 
In conclusion, we have tested 10 ClipFlair activities in Basque and 72 students have 
participated. 
Teachers´ comments 
After the piloting, teachers gave us feedback about their experience using ClipFlair. 
• It´s difficult to test an activity when students have to record the voice with a 
microphone, because there are multiple students in the same classroom and it is 
noisy. 
• In their opinion, there should be an option to lock the edited activity, because 
sometimes students close a window and it´s not possible to recover it. 
• They suggest including in the activity the auto-save option, to avoid losing 
information. 
• It would be very useful to use videos from YouTube, without downloading. 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
• It would be very interesting to include external activities, such as Hot potatoes or 
Google Form, without the need to get out of ClipFlair. 
• It would be interesting to have more activity-models and examples. 
• Finally, teachers pointed out that they consider useful ClipFlair Studio to work areas 
such as listening, translation or pronunciation. 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
2.4.6 University of Tallinn 
TLU carried out its piloting activity in two different contexts: secondary school 
students and university students. 
Figures related to the Clipflair Project by Tallinn University 
22 activities created 
2 activities piloted 
26 questionnaires answered 
2 teachers involved in the creation of activities 
3 teachers involved in the piloting 
The activites were created and piloted by project partners Kristiina Rebane, Kristiina 
Tedremaa – Levorato, Markus Oder, piloting in the secondary school was carried out 
by teacher Vittoriano Reno. The piloting took place in Tallinn University. The 
feedback from the students was mostly positive. The problems occurring were mostly 
technical (Silverlight installation, Macintosh). 
To encourage the Estonian foreign language teachers (FL) to start using audiovisual 
material in their classes we have been introducing Clipflair project on different 
occasions: 
1. Tallinn Winter School 2013 (07.01 – 25.01.2013). 
2. International education day 21.02.2013. A newsstand of different language 
study options was put up at the university for secondary school students. 
CLIPFLAIR leaflets were distributed and a mini-lesson was conducted on TV. 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
3. TLU Open doors day 15.03.2013 where the prospective students (secondary 
school students now) were introduced to the study possibilities at our 
university. There was an excursion to the language centre, during which 
Clipflair project was introduced and leaflets distributed. 
4. TLU Summer School 2013 (15.07 - 02.08.2013). Target group are foreigners 
who study Estonian. We targeted about 60 students of Estonian at elementary 
level. 
5. Foreign language teachers methodology days at Tallinn University 
22.11.2013 (98 participants). 
6. TLU days at our partner schools (students of secondary school, about 1000 
students). Autumn 2013. 
7. Presenting Clipflair to TLU Institute of Estonian Language and Culture 
foreign language teachers. 12.12.2013. 
8. TLU Winter School 2014 (06.01 – 24.01.2014). Target groups are foreigners 
who study Estonian. We targeted about 35 students of Estonian at elementary 
level. 
9. Tallinn University Language Centre international conference of foreign 
languages methodology (about 100 teachers) that was held in 04.04.2014. 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
10.TLU Summer School 2014 (14.07 – 31.07.2014). Target group are foreigners 
who study Estonian. We targeted about 40 students of Estonian (elementary and 
intermediate levels). 
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D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
2.4.7 University of Warsaw 
Pilot study report 
The report aims to present the evaluation procedures undertaken by University of 
Warsaw as part of the ClipFlair project and also to explain the lack of the data from 
pupils and teachers’ evaluation forms in the project database. 
Students’ involvement at the pre-pilot stage 
Students of the Institute of Linguistics, University of Warsaw, have been involved in 
the project work since the beginning of the project. In October2012, a group of 110 
students of the Institute of Linguistics, University of Warsaw, were introduced to the 
idea of Clipflair (CF). 60 of them were involved in the creation of video clips for the 
project. They worked in groups of four. Due to various levels of technical and content 
quality, four clips (Święconka, Pyszna zapiekanka, Abecadło Ślubnych obrzędów, 
Polskie tańce narodowe) were uploaded to the ClipFlair video gallery and used for 
Cliplair activities. 
First piloting stage 
At the first piloting stage in 2013 (summer semester 2012/13) the piloting process of 
ClipFlair activities took place at the Faculty of Polish at the University of Warsaw. 20 
students of extramural studies for teachers of Polish as a foreign language used the 
activities and evaluated them. However, both their academic supervisor and the 
students refused to fill in CF evaluation forms. They sent evaluation reports to the 
supervisor and to the Polish partners as written commentaries (see file: Teachers of 
Polish commenatries March 2013). In their evaluation, the teachers appreciated the 
attractive and innovative approach to teaching and learning languages, but they also 
emphasised the technical problems at that stage. They looked at them in a very 
creative way and suggested other ways the clips could be used for other linguistic 
and cultural purposes. They stressed that the activities need to be ordered in a 
traditional way which is clear to the teachers and students: separation of grammar 
tasks from discussion tasks, clear introductory and revision tasks. They used 
ClipFlair activities willingly to get to know its idea and implementation, but all 
explained that as the activities were available on the Internet for free, filling in the 
forms for the sake of bureaucratic CF procedures were not meaningful to them at all. 
Their supervisor participated in the evaluation interview and she said that for some 
teachers of Polish the technology is still a barrier. She asked for authoring tools to 
July 2014 Page | 55
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
make teachers more autonomous in creating activities and adopting them to the 
students’ needs. As far as the language level was concerned, she opted for activities 
forA1 and A2 only because most of the teachers of Polish as a foreign language 
need materials for these levels. For higher levels they may use other materials such 
as copies of commercial clips. She also complained about the quality of the clip 
about Warsaw, and some colloquial linguistic forms used in the activity instruction, 
which are not accepted by Polish purist teachers as they may be misleading to 
students of Polish as a foreign language. 
A teacher at a lower secondary school in Warsaw piloted some activities with 50 
students (2 classes). She was interviewed for evaluation, but again neither she nor 
her students were willing to fill in any evaluation forms. They simply treated the 
activities as part of the Internet resources, and used them in the way they wanted 
without an extra effort unrelated to learning and teaching. She tried activities based 
on Rosetta Stone’s clip from the Khan Academy as it related to the topics they 
worked on History class. Although the students are familiar with the topic, the 
language level was too high for them. However, she evaluated ClipFlair activities as 
an interesting approach to learning and teaching. 
50 third-year students of the Institute Applied Linguistics Bachelor Programme 
participating in a course Methodology of teaching English (pre-service teachers of the 
following languages (French, German, Spanish and Russian)) were shown how to 
use audiovisual materials in ClipFlair activities to develop all four language skills and 
audiovisual skills. As the group was big, 27 students, and the computer lab is only for 
20, they could use the activities at home computers, because ClipFlair was not 
available at their mobile devices in class. As the classes did not take place in the 
computer laboratory, group work was only possible. In class they were discussing 
activities based on Maggie the Witch and Rosetta Stone clips. The evaluation was 
done in the form of focus group interviews. The students presented balanced 
opinions. On the one hand, they appreciated the interactivity of the tasks, and the 
clear and natural context for language learning, e.g. a visit in the museum in the 
Rosetta Stone video. On the other hand, they noticed the gap between the time 
pupils get to know about the Rosetta Stone at school and their language level not 
high enough to understand the text with ease. 
The second piloting stage 
Winter semester 2013/14. 
July 2014 Page | 56
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
The students of the Institute of Applied Linguistics were involved at the piloting stage 
at different levels and through different courses. 
110 participated in a course Intermedial Teaching of Languages at the University of 
Warsaw Masters Programme. They were introduced to the ClipFlair project aims and 
activities. As the course was based on students’ access to their own mobile devices 
(Bring your own device approach), some of them couldn’t get access to ClipFlair 
activities through Android or iOS system on tablets in class. They all joined the 
ClipFlair community at social group Students at Warsaw University and their 
evaluation of various ClipFlair activities prepared in various languages is available 
there. The course puts emphasis on reflective and autonomous approach to learning 
and teaching. Thus, forms of documenting work were negotiated with the students. 
Oout of thetwo forms of evaluating the activities social media or forms, they chose 
social media as more qualitative. One of them reported later in an informal talk with 
the teacher that she used ClipFlair activities with some of her private learners, and 
they found them attractive, enjoyable and effective. 
50 third-year students of the Institute Applied Linguistics Bachelor Programme 
participating in the course Evaluation in glottodidactics (pre-service teachers of 
English) evaluated various elements of ClipFlair activities separately and activities as 
such. The ClipFlair activities were introduced to illustrate evaluation of audiovisual 
materials, listening and writing activities as well as audiovisual writing and speaking. 
The criteria for evaluating clips worked out within ClipFlair methodology were 
introduced as general tools for clip evaluation. They evaluated the clips as 
audiovisual materials to be used in language teaching and learning. They were all 
given the ClipFlair evaluation form address but they did not use it. 10 of the students 
provided written report as a document for their extra voluntary work. They are 
available in the zip file: Students’ evaluation October November 2013. They also 
evaluated ClipFlair activities, in group discussions in class, from the perspective of 
developing different skills as part of the use of various class tasks, but they did not 
prepare any written documents to summarise the results of the discussions. They 
also evaluated the authoring functionalities of the portal from the perspective of 
teachers who wanted to create their own activities. The appreciated the idea of using 
either films prepared by students or with students from the workstation without the 
need to publish them on the Internet. 
Summer semester 2013/14 
July 2014 Page | 57
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Course in Current tendencies in glottodidactics – lecture 
130 students participated in the course. ClipFlair was used to illustrate current trends 
in methodology of teaching languages. However, because of the type of the course, 
that is the lecture, the students did not use ClipFlair activities in class. They 
evaluated the activities in the interactive way during the lecture. At this stage of their 
professional development, they could evaluate the materials both from the students’ 
perspective and from the teacher’s perspective. And it turned out the perspectives 
differ. As students they were positive about the idea of using audiovisual materials by 
adding captioning and revoicing. They stressed the role of interlingual translation in 
learning with audiovisual materials. However, as teachers they would recommend the 
materials to pupils for individual work at home, but in class they will use them only on 
the condition they had easy access to computers, which is unlikely, and if the pupils 
were computer literate enough to focus on the language task. As the only course 
requirement for them was to pass the final exam at the end of the semester, it was 
impossible to ask them to formally evaluate the activities through filling in the 
ClipFlair forms. 
The table below presents the number of users involved in the creation and 
evaluation of ClipFlair activities 
Stage Time Number of 
secondary 
school 
students 
Number of 
in-service 
teachers 
Number of 
pre-service 
teachers 
Production Winter 
sem.2012/2013 
0 0 60 
First piloting Summer sem. 
2012/13 
50 20 150 
Second piloting stage Winter sem. 
2013/2014 
0 0 160 
Second piloting stage Summer 0 0 130 
July 2014 Page | 58
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
sem.2013/2014 
Total 50 20 500 
Final explanations 
To explain the context and reasons why students and teachers refused to fill in the 
evaluation forms, it is worth mentioning that in those days they were paid for 
participation in another project, and they also regularly received money for 
participation in surveys introduced by marketing companies. Thus, they were willingly 
learning the methodology how to use audiovisual materials in language learning, how 
to use interactive learning environment for learning and teaching languages, how to 
include multimodal translation into teaching and learning with technology, but they 
were not willing to invest their time and effort in filling in project questionnaires for 
free. As the activities were available on the Internet, the pupils used them in a way 
they wanted. 
At the institutional level it was also discussed to include the use of a ClipFlair activity 
as an obligatory task for one lesson taught by pre-service teachers during their 
pedagogical internship, which takes place in either primary or secondary schools. 
The university internship supervisors, after consultations with mentors at schools, 
refused to include this task, because of technical problems. The mentors were not 
able to provide the students with access to school computer laboratory. As the 
requirements for all students have to be the same, the task was not implemented. 
A teacher training centre in Warsaw was asked to include the ClipFlair activities in 
their teacher training courses. They refused to do it as they had to follow a strict plan 
and syllabi of the courses which had been approved the management team and the 
supervising local authorities a year before. 
As the reflective and autonomous approach to teacher training is implemented in 
some of the courses presented above, the students have a selection of tasks to be 
done as course requirements, or optional forms of documenting the work done with 
the emphasis on how meaningful the task is for them. They selected a narrative form 
of evaluation in a social group as more meaningful than filling project forms. 
Conclusions 
July 2014 Page | 59
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
The project activities were introduced to 20 teachers of Polish as a foreign language, 
50 pupils and 500 students of the Institute of Applied Linguistics and evaluated by 
them with the use of various qualitative tools, e.g. ClipFlair social group, interviews, 
focus group interviews, class discussions. The evaluation is more qualitative than 
quantitative in its nature, but well fitted to the course requirements and conditions. 
From this perspective, qualitative evaluation is complementary to quantitative one 
done by other partners. This also shows that ClipFlair activities may constitute a part 
of regular methodology courses for pre-service teachers of languages without 
changing syllabi of such courses. Piloting ClipFlair activities with pre-service teachers 
of various languages adds an extra value to the implementation of ClipFlair project 
results, which can also be perceived as extra unpredicted result of the ClipFlair 
project. 
July 2014 Page | 60
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
2.4.8 National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI Galway) 
NUI Galway carried out its piloting activity in a variety of contexts: with undergraduate 
university students, independent learners, adult learners in e-learning environments 
and secondary school students. 
Summary of figures related to the ClipFlair Project by NUI Galway 
28 activities created + 15 extra activities created for Italian, 1 French, 1 
German* 
24 activities piloted 
Students involved: approx. 400 students (some of these students tested 
several activities) 
questionnaires answered: 54 ** 
8 teachers and students involved in the creation of activities 
5 teachers involved in the piloting with students 
3 extra teachers were involved in the peer-review process and also individually 
piloted Irish activities (Lisa Ní Fhlatharta, Belinda McHale & Fiona Ní Chualáin) 
Table 1. Summary of NUI Galway team work 
* Additional activities in French and German were created specifically for piloting 
purposes with Mercy College Secondary School. 
**Because some activities were tested in tandem with Associate Partners (specifically 
Università degli Studi di Pavia and Uned, many answered questionnaires do not include 
reference to NUI Galway or to one of our teachers, for that reason they are not included 
here). 
July 2014 Page | 61
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
In addition to the three NUI Galway teachers who are members of the ClipFlair 
project, one additional teacher (Dr Jennifer Lertola) created and piloted activities with 
both teacher-dependent and independent learners. In particular, during the Academic 
Year 2013-2014, Dr Lertola carried out a two-semester pilot of activities with online 
mature students in order to test the feasibility of use of ClipFlair in e-learning 
environments. This was successful and it will be repeated again during the Academic 
Year 2014-2015. 13 students participated in this pilot, which tested 9 different 
activities, for a total of 117 tests. 
Two more teachers (Sara Buscio and Alessandro Luchetti) piloted activities within 
NUI Galway, while three others peer-reviewed and carried out individual pilots of 
some of the Irish-language activities. A student (Sinéad Nic Aodha) and two other 
members of staff (Éamon Ó Cofaigh, Pilar Alderete-Díez) also helped in the creation 
of a couple of the activities. Outside NUI Galway, our activities were piloted at the 
following institutions: 
- Dublin Institute of Technology 
- Mercy College Secondary School, Sligo 
- Kazimierz Wielki University, Bydgoszcz, Poland 
- Università degli Studi di Pavia, Italy (in collaboration with Associate Partner), 
- Europass, Florence, Italy 
- Uned, Madrid (in collaboration with Associate Partner) 
Clipflair members NUI Galway 
teachers Outside NUI Galway 
Laura McLoughlin Jennifer Lertola Dublin Institute of 
Technology 
Dorothy Ní Uigín Sara Buscio Mercy College, Sligo 
(secondary school) 
Rose Ní Dhubhda 
Alessandro 
Luchetti 
Kazimierz Wielki 
University, Bydgoszcz, 
Poland 
Università degli Studi di 
Pavia, Italy 
Europass, Florence, Italy 
July 2014 Page | 62
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
Clipflair members NUI Galway 
teachers Outside NUI Galway 
Uned, Madrid, Spain 
Table 2. Teachers and centres involved in the piloting by NUI Galway 
Unfortunately not all students completed a feedback questionnaire or registered in 
the Social. In the case of the Mercy College Secondary School, teachers advised us 
that they were not in favour of the registration of under-age students. In other cases, 
for example the online course, the same students were involved in the pilot of several 
activities during two semesters. These students registered and filled in 
questionnaires only once. 
The activities piloted by the NUI Galway team (also in close collaboration with 
Associate Partners) include a number of languages to reflect the interests of the 
students involved in the pilot. They include the following languages and language 
combinations: 
ANY LANGUAGE - 1 
ENGLISH – intralingual - 13 
IRISH – intralingual - 3 
ITALIAN – intralingual 15 
ENGLISH-ITALIAN - 10 
ENGLISH-FRENCH 1 
ENGLISH-GERMAN 1 
SPANISH - 1 
Use of ClipFlair social network 
The NUI Galway team has also made use of the social part of the Clipflair platform. It 
has resulted in the creation of the following groups: 
• NUIG 17 
July 2014 Page | 63
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
• Learning English 9 
• Learning Irish 3 
• Italian is fun 22 
• Bydgoszcz 6 
• UNED 65 (In collaboration with Associate Partner) 
• Commercials to Learn English 2 (In collaboration with Associate Partner) 
• RECORDS Project 9 (In collaboration with Associate Partner) 
While piloting activities in the Mercy College Secondary School and presenting 
ClipFlair to the language teachers, it was discovered that the www.clipflair.net website 
was not accessible from within the school. The teachers explained that, for security 
reasons, only approved websites can be accessed from within schools and provided 
contact details so that the ClipFlair website could be proposed for addition to the list. 
The PDST (Technology in Education Section) was therefore 
contacted, www.clipflair.net was vetted, approved and added to the list and it is now 
accessible from all secondary schools in Ireland. 
Finally, the NUI Galway team has contacted a number of different players in the field 
of Education, who have multiplying capacity – the School of Education within our own 
university for example; a national organisation – the Professional Development 
Service for Teachers (PDST) as well as some individual players (teachers, schools 
etc). Some have become Associate Partners while the project was being developed: 
• One Voice for Languages (Associate Partner) 
• Association of Teachers of Italian (Associate Partner) 
In addition, the following bodies were Associate Partners from the beginning of the 
project: 
• Post-Primary Initiative for Languages 
• An Chomhairle um Oideachas Gaeltachta & Gaelscolaíochta (COGG) 
July 2014 Page | 64
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
3 COMPARISON BETWEEN PILOT PHASES 
To conclude we will briefly compare the data obtained after the two pilot phases. It 
has to be noted that not all users at the pilot phase completed the questionnaire, 
which means that the below results are partial. The complete results are presented 
in section 2.4 Pilot use by partner. 
3.1 Participating Institutions 
The number of participating centres in the second pilot phase were twice as many in 
relation to those participating in the first pilot phase: from 7 to 16. In the first pilot 
phase all centres were universities, mostly ClipFlair partners. In the second phase, 
besides 10 university partners, 3 more universities participated, plus 2 primary 
schools and 1 high school. 
3.2 Participants 
The number of teachers piloting activities also doubled: from 18 to 37. The number of 
questionnaires answered by students, i.e., completed activities, increased from 318 
to 1173. 
3.3 Activities 
The number of activities piloted in the second phase increased tremendously. 
The quantity of piloted activities in the second phase (84) is four times larger than 
that of the first phase (20). The range of languages worked on in the activities almost 
doubled, going from 7 to 12. It is worth highlighting that only 20.7% of activities were 
designed to practise English, 13.8% were designed to practise non-European 
languages (Chinese, Japanese and Arabic), and 13% were designed to practise 
translation (different language combinations). 
July 2014 Page | 65
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
3.4 Teachers' results 
The data obtained from the first and second pilot phases are very similar as far as 
teachers' results are concerned. The results for the questionsWhere did students do 
the activity? and How often teachers use audiovisual materials? are almost identical 
to those in the interim report. RegardingTechnical problems, a decrease of 3% has 
been observed. 
3.5 Students' results 
The most relevant data observed when comparing the first and second pilot phases 
is the big increase in the number of activities completed (as observed in the 
increased number of questionnaires filled in by students, going from 318 to 1173). 
Another relevant piece of data is the students' country of origin and age. In relation to 
origin, students participating in the first pilot phase came from 17 different countries, 
while there were 30 different countries in the second phase. Regarding students' age, 
the fact that in the second phase primary and secondary students took part in the 
piloting, has made this data change, with the range of 18-35 years of age 
representing 93% in the first phase and 74% in the second. 
July 2014 Page | 66
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
APPENDIX 1. Teachers’ questionnaire 
July 2014 Page | 67
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
July 2014 Page | 68
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
July 2014 Page | 69
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
APPENDIX 2. Students’ questionnaire 
July 2014 Page | 70
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
July 2014 Page | 71
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
July 2014 Page | 72
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
July 2014 Page | 73
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
APPENDIX 3. Pictures from piloted activities 
Some teachers took pictures during the piloting of activities in the language labs. 
Here are some examples. 
July 2014 Page | 74
D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 
APPENDIX 4: Reminder sent to students via email 
July 2014 Page | 75
Banos Pinero, Rocio 
From: Banos Pinero, Rocio 
Sent: 26 March 2014 10:15 
To: Felices Gutierrez, Ana; Barcena Panero, Ana; Zamagni, Benedetta; Gioia, Cecilia; 
Song, Chang; Di Stadio, Elisabetta; Zhang, Feifei; Zhou, Heran; Chen, I-Chun; Fang, 
Jing; Acha Villaro, Judit; Filicicchia, Laura; Kozinski, Marcin; Napoli, Marianna; 
Cecino, Martina; Zhang, Qian; Banos Pinero, Rocio; Chen, Ran; Piras, Simona; Haro 
Guerra, Sofia; Poerschke Freitas, Thaise; Ning, Tianbai; Gaudenzi, Valeria; Labianca, 
Viviana; Cai, Wangyu; Zhou, Wei; Tan, Tina; Jin, Xinchun; Ni, Sharon; Peng, Yao; 
Zhao, Yingwen; Chou, Yu-Hua; Liang, Zhenming 
Cc: Navarrete Ramirez-Montesinos, Marga 
Subject: IMPORTANT: TRANG012 Task to be completed 
Dear all, 
This is a reminder about the ClipFlair task to be completed for TRANG012. I know it’s a long email, but please read 
it to the end. 
What do you have to do? 
1) Translate Friends dialogue into your target language, making sure that your translation contains features 
typical of spontaneous conversation. For this you will have to follow these steps: 
a. Open the activity by going to http://studio.clipflair.net/?activity=Friends_en_Rev_C1_ANY.clipflair 
b. If you want to carry on where you left it on Monday, load your work there by clicking on the button 
Load Activity from file, at the bottom of the screen 
. Select the file you saved after the session on Monday. It will 
1 
have a .clipflair extension. 
c. If you prefer to, you can start from scratch. In this case, make sure you save your work frequently by 
clicking on the floppy disk icon. When resaving your work, it will ask you to replace the file you 
created the first time you saved it, which is fine. 
d. Carry on with your work: enter the translation in the caption spaces provided (the timing has been 
set up for you, but you can change this if you want to). Remember that this text is not for subtitling 
in this case, but to help you record the dialogue. 
e. Once you have entered your translation, revoice each of the captions separately by clicking on the 
recording button ( ). When you have finished reading your translation aloud, click on . 
f. You don’t have to play the video as you record! 
g. Once you have recorded a few utterances, click on Play to see how your translation will sound. Bear 
in mind that synchronisation won’t be perfect, but this is not important here (you’re not a voice 
talent!). What matters is that you realise: 1) if your translation sounds oral; 2) if your translation fits 
within the time given. 
2) IMPORTANT: Fill in the feedback form available at: http://tinyurl.com/clipflairfeedback. 
This is very important as it will enable us to improve the platform to be able to use it for teaching purposes. 
By filling in this form you will be contributing to the ClipFlair project by helping to develop this free online 
and easy to use platform for subtitling and dubbing! 
***When filling in this form, you will be asked to include the name of the tutor (Rocío Banos), as well as the 
URL of the activity: http://studio.clipflair.net/?activity=Friends_en_Rev_C1_ANY.clipflair 
3) OPTIONAL: Upload your activity in ClipFlair Social Network 
a. Go to http://social.clipflair.net/. 
b. If you haven't registered yet, do so by clicking on 
http://social.clipflair.net/login.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2f. 
c. Go to the MSc Translation group and post your activity there.
Why should I post my activity there? I’ll try my best to make sure that feedback is provided to 
those who post their activities on the platform. Also, you will be able to check what other peers 
have done and learn from others’ work. 
2 
If you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact me! 
I hope you enjoy working with ClipFlair. 
Rocío 
Dr Rocío Baños 
Lecturer in Translation 
Centre for Translation Studies (CenTraS) 
University College London 
Room 206, 50 Gordon Square 
London WC1H 0PQ 
Tel. +44 (0)2076799361 
r.banos@ucl.ac.uk 
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/centras

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ClipFlair Pilot Use Report

  • 1. CLIPFLAIR Foreign Language Learning Through Interactive Revoicing and Captioning of Clips LIFELONG LEARNING PROGRAMME - KEY ACTIVITY 2 LANGUAGES, MULTILATERAL PROJECT 519085-LLP-1-2011-1-ES-KA2-KA2MP D5.1 ClipFlair Pilot Use Report WP No. WP5 WP Title Pilot use of the produced activities by FL learners (final) Activity description This deliverable records the findings from the final stage of the pilot use of the project outputs (academic year 2013-14). They will be used as source material for the final evaluation report. End users: project members Authors Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB): Lupe Romero, Helena Casas-Tost, Anabel Galán-Mañas, Lucía Molina, Patricia Rodríguez-Inés, Sara Rovira, Olga Torres-Hostench Status (D: draft; RD: revised draft; F: final) F File Name D5.1.PilotUseReport.doc Date 15 July 2014 July 2014 Page | 1
  • 2. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report (final stage) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This deliverable records the findings from the final stage of the pilot use of the project outputs (academic year 2013-14). They will be used as source material for the final evaluation report. This document includes: • Details on the organization of the final pilot test (general information on the test, sample information, questionnaires, etc.) • Teachers’ results • Students’ results • Conclusions from the pilot test and suggestions for improvement • Results by universities July 2014 Page | 2
  • 3. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Table of Contents 1 ORGANIZATION OF THE PILOT USE OF THE PLATFORM.............................................. 7 1.1 The questionnaire for the teacher............................................................................................. 8 1.2 The questionnaire for the student............................................................................................. 8 2 RESULTS.............................................................................................................. 10 2.1 Description ............................................................................................................................ 10 2.1.1 Universities ................................................................................................................... 10 2.1.2 Teachers........................................................................................................................ 11 2.1.3 Students........................................................................................................................ 11 2.1.4 Languages ..................................................................................................................... 12 2.1.5 Activities ....................................................................................................................... 12 2.2 Teachers’ Results ................................................................................................................... 12 2.2.1 Results regarding the activities........................................................................................ 12 2.2.2 Results regarding the technical problems......................................................................... 15 2.3 Students’ results .................................................................................................................... 16 2.3.1 Overall results................................................................................................................ 16 2.3.2 Students’ Profile ............................................................................................................ 16 2.3.3 About ClipFlair activities ................................................................................................. 25 2.3.4 About ClipFlair Studio..................................................................................................... 26 2.3.5 About the ClipFlair web application ................................................................................. 27 2.3.6 About the ClipFlair social network ................................................................................... 28 2.4 Pilot use by university ............................................................................................................ 32 2.4.1 Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB)....................................................................... 32 July 2014 Page | 3
  • 4. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 2.4.2 Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF) ..................................................................................... 36 2.4.3 Imperial College London (ICL) and University College London (UCL) ................................... 41 2.4.4 Universitatea „Babeș-Bolyai”, Cluj-Napoca, Romania (UBB)............................................... 44 2.4.5 University of Deusto....................................................................................................... 49 2.4.6 University of Tallinn ....................................................................................................... 52 2.4.7 University of Warsaw ..................................................................................................... 55 2.4.8 National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI Galway)......................................................... 61 3 COMPARISON BETWEEN PILOT PHASES.................................................................. 65 3.1 Participating Institutions ........................................................................................................ 65 3.2 Participants ........................................................................................................................... 65 3.3 Activities................................................................................................................................ 65 3.4 Teachers' results .................................................................................................................... 66 3.5 Students' results .................................................................................................................... 66 APPENDIX 1. Teachers’ questionnaire .................................................................................................. 67 APPENDIX 2. Students’ questionnaire................................................................................................... 70 APPENDIX 3. Pictures from piloted activities......................................................................................... 74 APPENDIX 4: Reminder sent to students via email ................................................................................ 75 List of Tables Table 1. Summary of piloted activities…………………………………………………………………………………12 Table 2. Summary of UAB team work……………………………………………………………………………35 Table 3. Summary of teachers involved in the piloting at UAB………………………………………..36 July 2014 Page | 4
  • 5. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report List of Figures Figure 1. Where did students do the activity? ............................................................. 13 Figure 2. Where did students perform the activity? [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)] 14 Figure 3. How often teachers use audiovisual materials ............................................... 14 Figure 4. How often do you use other kinds of audiovisual activities in this course? [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)]..................................................................... 15 Figure 5. Students’ native languages .......................................................................... 17 Figure 6. Students’ native languages [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)]............. 17 Figure 7. Students’ gender ........................................................................................ 18 Figure 8. Students’ age group.................................................................................... 18 Figure 9. Students’ current place of study................................................................... 19 Figure 10. Students’ current place of study [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)].. 19 Figure 11. Completed studies................................................................................... 20 Figure 12. Completed studies [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)] ..................... 20 Figure 13. Activity language proficiency level............................................................. 21 Figure 14. Previous use of multimedia in language lessons ......................................... 22 Figure 15. Like/Dislike the use of audiovisual material................................................ 22 Figure 16. Like/Dislike working with computers ......................................................... 23 Figure 17. Reasons for not having completed the activity ........................................... 24 Figure 18. Usefulness of ClipFlair activity for language learning ................................... 25 Figure 19. Technical problems.................................................................................. 26 July 2014 Page | 5
  • 6. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Figure 20. Main types of technical problems ............................................................. 27 Figure 21. About the ClipFlair web application........................................................... 28 Figure 22. Use of ClipFlair social network .................................................................. 28 Figure 23. Piloting at IES Esteve Terradas .................................................................. 34 Figure 24. Use of ClipFlair social network .................................................................. 35 July 2014 Page | 6
  • 7. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 1 ORGANIZATION OF THE PILOT USE OF THE PLATFORM The UAB partner established the procedure for the final pilot test in coordination with the Project Managers at UPF. The procedure consisted of the following steps: • Developing the instructions to fill out the questionnaires. • Controlling the development of the pilot phase. • Analysing the results from the questionnaires. The pilot procedure was shared with the rest of project partners. Questions and comments regarding the pilot phase were posted and answered in the project management tool. The instructions to be followed by all partners during the pilot phase were the following: 1. All partners should use the following forms after the piloting of each activity. Both forms are also available in the Documents area of Redmine. a. Learner feedback form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1oqBPyNDwVBEK33MwmSeNXEiBthjG5UdYHwJL FTUphmo/viewform b. Pilot test information form to be filled in by the teacher: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1km6wmBgQczBehgZYyLhUGeXshF21Ekx -8waeDDW3ACE/viewform 3. The deadline to pilot the activities and to submit both questionnaires is 17th May 2014. 4. You might need to translate the learner feedback form. In that case we will make a copy of the form and give you rights to edit it and translate it. Then we will merge all results in the same Excel file. 5. The UAB team will collect all the data from the submitted questionnaires and will post it in Redmine as an Excel file. 6. All partners should check their data in Redmine and translate into English those answers in languages different from English before 30th May. 7. Partners are kindly asked to post on Redmine team pictures from their piloting experience. July 2014 Page | 7
  • 8. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 8. The UAB team will write the final pilot test report to be discussed in Barcelona’s final meeting (June 2014). The UAB Team encouraged project partners to participate in the pilot phase and, in due time, reminded them of the deadline. Results from students and teachers participating in the pilot phase were recorded in a GoogleDocs file. After deadline on 17th May the UAB team started analyzing the results in order to prepare this report. It has to be noted that not all users of the platform filled in the questionnaire. The complete and detailed pilot use by partner can be seen in section “ Pilot use by university” page 32 1.1 The questionnaire for the teacher A form to be filled in by every teacher after piloting one of his/her own activities was originally designed by the UAB team and later agreed upon with several other partners. The form consisted of three blocks (see Appendix 1). The first block included teacher’s data, such as name and surname, e-mail address and centre affiliation. The second block focused on activity data, such as the title of the piloted activity (identified by the URL link) and a question about the time students needed to complete the activity. The last block aimed to gather detailed information about the context where the activity was piloted, such as the course, the learning environment (in class with the teacher, in a lab without teacher supervision, or at home), number of students, how often the teacher uses other types of audiovisual activities in his/her course). A box was available for teachers to comment on any technical problems experienced or any other aspect that could be useful as feedback. 1.2 The questionnaire for the student The questionnaire to be filled in by students is divided into four blocks (see Appendix 2). The first one, Pilot study data, collects three basic data: July 2014 Page | 8
  • 9. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report (1) the centre in which the activity was performed; (2) the name of the teacher who piloted the activity; (3) whether the student completed the activity or not. A negative answer to the last question would not allow the student to fill in the questionnaire of the activity, but led him/her to a window with possible reasons for not having finished the activity. The rationale behind these items (I didn't have time, It was too complicated, I had technical problems, I did not like the video, I don't like computers, I didn't understand what I had to do, I don't feel comfortable recording my voice) was to provide data on both the activity and the platform. The second block, About the ClipFlair Activity, aims to describe the learner experience with the activity. Therefore, the most important item within this part is “The activity was…interesting, fun, useful for language learning, useful for improving my competence in translation, easy, had clear instructions, I would like to do more activities like the one I did”. Students choose their answers from an ordinary scale (Not at all, No, More or less, Yes, Very much). This block also includes an item regarding technical problems. The third block, About the ClipFlair Studio, seeks to show the learner experience with the web application. It consists of two questions, one related to the platform and the other to the social network. The first question crosses opinions (The ClipFlair Studio is user-friendly, The interface is attractive, On the whole, I enjoyed the ClipFlair experience) with an ordinary scale (Not at all, No, More or less, Yes, Very much). The second question is “Did you use the ClipFlair Social Network?” and the possible answers are Yes or Not. At the end of this part students can also add their comments. The fourth and last block is About the learner. It collects personal data (country of origin, native language, gender, age, centre where he/she is studying, his/her proficiency level in the language of the activity), and data about the learner’s experience with audiovisual materials (I like working with clips and audiovisual material to learn foreign languages, I like working with computers). July 2014 Page | 9
  • 10. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 2 RESULTS 2.1 Description 2.1.1 Universities A total of 20 academic centres have participated in both pilot tests: 7 ClipFlair Partners and 13 associate partners. From those, 13 are universities and 7 non-university centres. In first pilot test, 8 universities participated: 6 ClipFlair partners and 2 associate partners (also universities). Partner Universities Associate partners ClipFlair P3. UAB, Barcelona (Spain) ClipFlair P5. UBBCLUJ, Cluj (Romania) ClipFlair P7. TLU, Tallinn (Estonia) ClipFlair P10. NUI, Galway (Ireland) ClipFlair. Algarve (Portugal) ClipFlair. Deusto (Spain) ClipFlair. UCL (UK) UNED, Madrid (Spain) HOU, Athens (Greece) Polygyros School (Greece) University of Leeds (UK) IES Esteve Terradas Kurutziaga Ikastola Lawdale Primary School Private Lessons at Worksite Warsaw University of Technology University of Pavia Mercy College, Sligo Kazimierz Wielki University EUROPASS Centro Studi Europeo July 2014 Page | 10
  • 11. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 2.1.2 Teachers A total of 37 different teachers have taken part in the piloting of activities (12 in the first pilot test). Some of these teachers have piloted activities with groups from other teachers, disseminating the platform to teachers not involved in the project. The rest of teachers are active members of the ClipFlair project. 2.1.3 Students A total of 1219 student questionnaires (318 in the first pilot test) were answered by students during the pilot phase. A total of 84 different ClipFlair activities were done. There are 23 questionnaires that cannot be related to a particular activity due to missing data. Centre Learners Teachers Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain 433 9 University Babes Bolyai, Romania 394 7 Tallinn University, Estonia 38 3 National University of Ireland, Galway 54 6 Imperial College London, UK 21 2 University of Leeds, UK 11 1 Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, 41 1 Spain Hellenic Open University, Greece 24 1 First Primary School of Polygyros, Greece 18 1 University College London, UK 7 1 Universidad de Deusto, Spain 11 1 University of Algarve, Portugal 16 1 July 2014 Page | 11
  • 12. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain 44 2 Other Secondary Education and Adult Learning 107 5 Institutions: (Institut Esteve Terradas, Warsaw University of Technology, Università di Pavia, Europass Centro Studi Europeo, Mercy College, Kurutziaga Ikastola) TOTAL 1,219 41 Table 1. Summary of completed questionnaires 2.1.4 Languages Twelve different languages have been used in the final pilot test (as opposed to 7 languages in the first pilot test): English, Portuguese, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Basque, Irish, Estonian and Italian. 20.7% of activities in the ClipFlair Gallery were designed to practice English and around 13.8% of activities to practice non-EU languages: Chinese, Japanese and Arabic. From the questionnaires provided by teachers we know that there is a small proportion of activities (13%) designed to practice translation with different language combination. 2.1.5 Activities In total, 84 activities have been piloted. 2.2 Teachers’ Results This section presents the results collected using the teacher’s feedback form known as Pilot use information (see Appendix 1). This form had to be filled in by every teacher after piloting one of his/her own activities. It includes the results received until the 17th May, which was the deadline for the activity pilot phase. Below is a summary of where the students carried out the piloted activity, how often the teacher used other kinds of audiovisual activities in his/her course, and a classification by categories of the technical problems reported by teachers. A total of 25 teachers answered the teacher’s form. 2.2.1 Results regarding the activities Where did students perform the activity? July 2014 Page | 12
  • 13. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Most activities were piloted in class together with the teacher; only 30% of them were piloted without teacher supervision, either in a language lab or at home. Some of the activities were done in class with the teacher, but students did not have enough time to fill in the feedback questionnaire and were asked to do it at home. This may be the reason why not all students filled in the questionnaire. Where did students do the activity? 70% 24% 6% In class with the teacher At home In a lab without teacher supervision Figure 1. Where did students do the activity? In order to be able to compare total results with first pilot results, see below the results from the first pilot test: July 2014 Page | 13
  • 14. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Figure 2. Where did students perform the activity? [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)] Length of activity The length of activities ranged from less than 5 minutes to more than 30 minutes, except for two activities that were done at home and the teacher did not know how long students took to do it. How often do you use other kinds of audiovisual activities in this course? Only around 25% of the teachers involved in the piloting phase use audiovisual materials often or very often, while most use them every now and then or seldom. How often teachers use audiovisual materials 43% 11% 19% Seldom (once every two months or less) Now and then (once every 2-4 weeks) Never Often (once a week) Very often (more than once a week) Figure 3. How often teachers use audiovisual materials 13% 14% Notice that some teachers that never use audiovisual materials (14%) and have decided to use ClipFlair in the second pilot test, which is good news. In the first pilot test, more teachers were used to audiovisual materials in class (see below): July 2014 Page | 14
  • 15. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Figure 4. How often do you use other kinds of audiovisual activities in this course? [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)] 2.2.2 Results regarding the technical problems As far as technical problems experienced during the second pilot phase is concerned, teachers reported technical problems in only 23% of the cases, slightly lower than in the preliminary pilot test (26%). Most technical problems during second pilot test were not due to ClipFlair but to other causes, such as: “Some students had problems with Silverlight” “A bit of buffering at the video, but the internet connexion was slow” “Students experienced problems using University PCs (Windows xp) and their laptops (Windows 7 and 8)” Concerning audio, teachers reported the following technical problems: “One revoicing was extremely low (mic was working properly), another one recorded student's voice over original audio without and one could hear both voices. In another case, sentences were clipped (recordings seemed to be incomplete).” “Initially, but due to the way the sound was organized in that particular lab. Once the proper programmes were activate, everything worked very well.” “They had problems trying to record their voices” July 2014 Page | 15
  • 16. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report “Students complained about the fact that they cannot see how long their recordings are. In addition, when students pause the video to listen to their recordings, their recordings keep going on and cannot be paused.” “Revoicing didn't work properly. Students' voices were mixed with the original soundtrack so that both English and Italian audio could be heard.” Concerning captions, one teacher reported that “*It'd be good if the platform allowed the teacher to set a maximum number of characters allowed per subtitle”, and actually, the program allows to mark a maximum number of characters. It is worth mentioning that in Ireland, for the ClipFlair website to become accessible to secondary school, a request had to be sent to the National Teachers’ Council. The petition was sent and accepted. 2.3 Students’ results 2.3.1 Overall results In this section the results of the questionnaire filled out by students are presented: results about students’ profile; results about ClipFlair activities; results about ClipFlair Studio and results about the ClipFlair web application. 2.3.2 Students’ Profile These data have been obtained from the Students’ Questionnaire (see Appendix 2). Although 1173 students participated in the pilot tests, only 1076 completed a ClipFlair activity. Thirty-seven teachers coming from 13 different universities were involved in the pilot studies: National University of Ireland (Galway), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and Universitatea Babeş-Bolyai, Tallinn University, Hellenic Open University, Algarve, Deusto, UCL, HOU, University of Leeds and UNED, plus non-university centres such as Polygyros, IES Esteve Terradas, Kurutziaga Ikastola, Lawdale Primary School, and Private Lessons at Worksite. The students participating in the pilot tests came from 30 different countries. Most of them come from European countries (98%), although there are respondents from Africa, America, Asia and Australia. Among all the students, 65% said they have a July 2014 Page | 16
  • 17. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report single mother tongue; 16% considered him/herself bilingual and 19% trilingual. Compared to the preliminary pilot test, many more students considered themselves to be bilingual and trilingual. Native speaker of 65% 1 language 2 languages 3 languages Figure 5. Students’ native languages 16% 19% Notice differences between final results and first pilot test below: Native speaker of 89% 9% 2% One language Figure 6. Students’ native languages [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)] Regarding gender, the vast majority, 75%, are women, just 3% less than in the preliminary pilot test. July 2014 Page | 17
  • 18. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 75% Figure 7. Students’ gender Regarding age, the vast majority of students, 74%, belong to the age group between 18 and 35. The group aged between 13 and 18 represents 13%, the group aged under 13 represents 10% and the group aged over 35 represents the remaining 3%. Compared to the first pilot test, there are considerable less students in the age group between 18 and 35 (from 93% to 74%) and there has been an increase in the age groups below 18 years old, while the group above 35 has remained more or less steady. Figure 8. Students’ age group 25% Gender Female Male 74% 13% 10% 3% Age group 18 - 35 years old 13 - 18 years old < 13 years old > 35 years old July 2014 Page | 18
  • 19. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report In the item “I am a student at”, the answer "University" was the most popular (77%), which is probably the case because most of the activities were piloted by teachers from universities involved in the ClipFlair project. I am a student at Figure 9. Students’ current place of study These results can be compared with those of first pilot test: Figure 10. Students’ current place of study [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)] 77% 18% 4% 1% University Secondary School Other Language School 0,35 0,35 99,31 Student of Language school Secondary school University July 2014 Page | 19
  • 20. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report The fact that almost all the students who participated in the pilot test were currently pursuing studies at university conditions the results from another item: “Level of Studies completed”. More than half of the students, 60%, answered “school”, while another significant percentage of the students, 27%, stated they hold a university degree. We assume that they are currently pursuing their second or third university degree. Figure 11. Completed studies 3% 2% These results can be compared with those of first pilot test: Figure 12. Completed studies [Source: Deliverable 1136 (first pilot test)] 60% 27% 8% Level of studies School University degree Other Post-graduate (MA, PhD) Vocational Training 37% 4% 3% 48% 8% Level of studies University degree Post-graduate (MA, PhD) Vocational Training July 2014 Page | 20
  • 21. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report The item “Proficiency level in the language of the activity” shows that most participating students rated their knowledge of the language as upper intermediate (4) or intermediate (3). Proficiency level in the language of the activity 10% 14% 22% 28% 26% 1 2 3 4 5 Figure 13. Activity language proficiency level The questionnaire includes three questions inquiring about the students’ familiarity with using audiovisual material and interest in the technical and pedagogical environment of ClipFlair activities: computer and clips. It should be noted that nearly a quarter of the students rated “I have used video or multimedia as a language student before doing any ClipFlair Activity” with the lowest score. July 2014 Page | 21
  • 22. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report I have used video or multimedia as a language student before doing any ClipFlair Activity 22% 15% 13% 29% 21% 1 2 3 4 5 Figure 14. Previous use of multimedia in language lessons In contrast, 75% of the students responded very positively to the statement “I like working with clips and audiovisual material to learn foreign languages”, scoring 4 or 5 out of 5. I like working with clips and audiovisual material to learn foreign languages 3% 5% 17% 33% 42% 1 2 3 4 5 Figure 15. Like/Dislike the use of audiovisual material July 2014 Page | 22
  • 23. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report The same positive result can be observed in relation to the last statement, “I like working with computers”. I like working with computers 3% 5% 15% 33% 44% 1 2 3 4 5 Figure 16. Like/Dislike working with computers Finally, the reasons provided by students who did not finish their activity are displayed below. It can be observed that the vast majority, 76%, argues lack of time. We think that this “lack of time” is probably related to the novelty that the ClipFlair environment represents for the student. Probably, if the student were familiar with the platform, he/she would have been faster. July 2014 Page | 23
  • 24. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report I did not complete the ClipFlair activity because 76% 1% Figure 17. Reasons for not having completed the activity 2% 6% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% 0% I didn't have time I had technical problems It was too complicated, I didn't understand what I had to do I didn't have time, I don't feel comfortable recording my voice It was too complicated I didn't have time, I had technical problems It was too complicated, I didn't understand what I had to do, I don't feel comfortable Ir edcidonrd'ti nugn dmeyr svtoaincde what I had to do July 2014 Page | 24
  • 25. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 2.3.3 About ClipFlair activities Over 80% of students answered “yes” or “very much” to the statements “The activity was useful for language learning” and “The activity was useful for improving my competence in translation”. In addition, over 60% considered that the instructions were clear. According to this, it can be said that the answers that got best results are those related to the pedagogical usefulness of ClipFlair activities. Figure 18. Usefulness of ClipFlair activity for language learning 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 Yes Yes, very much so More or less No Not at all July 2014 Page | 25
  • 26. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 2.3.4 About ClipFlair Studio Over 80% of students had no technical difficulties in the second phase of the piloting of the platform as shown in the questionnaires filled in by students during 2014. Even though the figures are similar to those in the first phase, most of the problems pointed out in the interim report have already been solved. It is important to highlight that some technical problems were experienced by just one user and were related to rather personal circumstances (e.g. their PC at home, their Internet connection). I had technical problems No Yes (please specify in the next question) Figure 19. Technical problems 83% 17% It is to be highlighted that several problems mentioned in the interim report have been solved satisfactorily and are not mentioned anymore. These problems are the loading of videos and compatibility of the system with the computer, as well as the fact that, in captions, it was not possible to write from right to left, as in Arabic. Additionally, 13 users said that they had experienced technical problems but never specified of what type. July 2014 Page | 26
  • 27. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Main types of technical problems The audio The captions The synchronisation The video 28% 14% 23% 35% Figure 20. Main types of technical problems 2.3.5 About the ClipFlair web application Generally speaking, the three web application-related items included in the questionnaire have had positive answers. In the first item, “The ClipFlair Studio is user-friendly”, almost 80% of students have answered “yes” or “very much so”. In the second, “The interface is attractive”, the response has been less enthusiastic, with “yes” and “more or less” rating almost the same. The third, which is a global question, “On the whole, I enjoyed the ClipFlair experience” has been rated highest if we take into account both answers “yes” and “very much so”. July 2014 Page | 27
  • 28. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Figure 21. About the ClipFlair web application 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 2.3.6 About the ClipFlair social network Figure 18 below shows that almost half of the students (46%) used the ClipFlair social network facilities. Although the percentage is not very high, it increased a lot compared to the first pilot phase, when only 23% of students had used it. Lack of time when doing the activity and answering the questionnaire may be the cause of these results. Clipflair Social Network Figure 22. Use of ClipFlair social network 0 The Clipflair Studio is user-friendly The interface is atractive On the whole, I ejoyed Clipflair Yes Yes very much so More or less No Not at all 54% 46% No Yes July 2014 Page | 28
  • 29. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report OBSERVATIONS Not all students provided observations in their questionnaires. However, some students gave valuable feedback for the partners. Below there is a summary: Suggestions for improvement Actions taken and situation by the end of from first pilot 2013 project On the interface:  It is a bit unclear Solved  It is a bit blurry Solved  The resolution of the screen should be improved Non-ClipFlair related  The quality of the subtitles on the screen was not very good Solved  The zoom should be adjusted somehow because it zooms out of page, and the windows cannot be positioned freely Solved  The interface should be more "compact" Solved  The recording with the instructions about how to use ClipFlair are repeated, and they could be deleted Activity-related  The number of characters should be limited in captions, as in professional subtitling Added feature  It could be useful to save the project as a video file Elements can be saved separately and together  It should be possible to pause the video by pressing the space bar Pause button On technical problems:  Problems with recording audio and video Solved  Microphone should be checked beforehand Non-ClipFlair related  System needs to be adapted to allow for writing from right to left Added feature Some students also provided feedback to improve the design of activities and the overall learning experience: July 2014 Page | 29
  • 30. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 1) “I think students could benefit with a demo in class before using it at home themselves. After I was shown it all made sense.” 2) “Idea for activity: listening to the video without the captions” 3) Difficulty:” trying to understand the exact words/tenses spoken” 4) Difficulty: “recording the clips” 5) Difficulty: “revoicing the clips in the time allowed was difficult & needed lots of practice.” 6) Suggestion: ”I think a more detailed explanation of how to set up would help. Our tutor addressed this issue on our second on campus session and then all was fine.” 7) Suggestion: “ClipFlair should be used to work with vocabulary in a more intensive manner” 8) Suggestion: “activities should be more interesting” Positive students’ observations, exactly as they themselves wrote them, are presented below: POSITIVE OBSERVATIONS (First pilot First semester 2013) I'm using it for the first time at Chinese class. I find it very interesting, and for being in a beta stage it's very complete: It has so many features that give so many different exercise opportunities to make. I only would make the interface more "compact", but I like it. It is a fun way of improving your translations' skills. ClipFlair is an easy to use, yet really useful system. I especially liked the way in which it combines knowledge and learning with fun. I enjoyed using it, since it is something new for me. I will definitely use it again, since I find it interesting. I think it is a very useful and attractive activity, not only for students but for any speaker of foreign languages who would like to improve his/her knowledge. We all love movies, and the activity is so interesting that it could be done as a hobby too. I hoped for a bit more interesting exercises. In my opinion, the exercises which were proposed were very useful for the vocabulary enrichment, so I think it is very useful. This activity make you to learn different adjectives and practice your pronunciation. It´s very fun and useful for tourism´s students. This activity was more difficult than the another one about Edinburgh, because here you need to speak about senses and feelings and emotions more than only you need describe the images. But it´s was amazing. July 2014 Page | 30
  • 31. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report In my opinion the web is very well structured. I think this is a very useful web, given the low number of available webs to learn languages currently It's an interesting activity and useful for improving your knowledge on this language. I think the most attractive aspect of this program is how easy it is to use it, and how it helps to discover new things about your language combination. POSITIVE OBSERVATIONS (Second pilot 2013-2014) I like the Clipflair application. I think the platform is a good learning tool. It was a very interesting and useful experience. ClipFlair Studio helped especially in the listening/audio section. I think this is an easy-to-use platform, very useful for students and teachers alike, I enjoyed working with it. I like watching videos and do practical exercises there. I think the exercises are very useful. July 2014 Page | 31
  • 32. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 2.4 Pilot use by university 2.4.1 Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) Summary of figures related to the Clipflair Project by UAB 56 activities created 25 activities piloted 433 questionnaires 395 questionnaires answered 6 teachers involved in the creation of activities 10 teachers involved in the piloting Table 2 Summary of UAB team work Apart from the six UAB teachers who are members of the Clipflair project (who have been in charge of creating and piloting activities), there have been four more teachers who have piloted our activities. Two of these teachers belong to the same institution (UAB) and the remaining two come from the secondary school IES Esteve Terradas. The following table summarizes these figures: Clipflair members UAB teachers Secondary school IES. Esteve Terradas Anabel Galán Maria Regina Dora Garde July 2014 Page | 32
  • 33. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Clipflair members UAB teachers Secondary school IES. Esteve Terradas Saraiva Mendes Helena Casas Tost Xianghong Qu Francesca Ceres Lucía Molina Olga Torres Hostench Patricia Rodríguez-Inés Sara Rovira-Esteva Table 3. Teachers involved in the piloting at UAB IES Esteve Terradas published an entry on the piloting of Clipflair activities in their web page (see snapshot below). For more information click on the following link: http://www.esteveterradas.cat/index.php/noticies-ies-125/cicles-formatius/llenguees-estrangeres/ 1082-el-projecte-clipflair-al-centre: July 2014 Page | 33
  • 34. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Figure 23. Piloting at IES Esteve Terradas The activities created by the UAB team that have been piloted include the following foreign languages and language combinations, in the case of translation activities: 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Arabic Chinese Portuguese translation English> Catalan Translation English> Spanish Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona July 2014 Page | 34
  • 35. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Figure 24. Use of ClipFlair social network The UAB team has made wide use of the social part of the Clipflair platform. It has resulted in the creation of following groups, together with the amount of users of each one of them: • Iniciación a la traducción (31) • TB-A3 (23) • Traducción científico-técnica FTI (28) • Tradumatica UNIOR (15) • Tradumatica (29) • TAV Chinese-Spanish (UAB) (44) • TAV Lleida (4) • Learning Arabic (17) • Learning Chinese (7) Finally, the UAB team has contacted different authorities from the Education Department of the Catalan Government (Generalitat de Catalunya), who attended the Clipflair Conference: • Head of Primary and Secondary school: Neus Lorenzo • Head of Foreign Language Schools (EOI): Neus Figueres Below are some pictures of the piloting of activities at the UAB (see more pictures in appendix 3). July 2014 Page | 35
  • 36. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 2.4.2 Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF) UPF Barcelona carried out its piloting activity in a university context but with groups from different undergraduate programs, collaborating in one project. Summary of figures related to the Clipflair Project by UPF 2 activities created 2 activities piloted 35 questionnaires 21 questionnaires answered 2 teachers involved in the creation of activities 2 teachers involved in the piloting Table 1 Summary of UPF team work The following UPF teachers have created and piloted the activities: UPF staff Elena Voellmer Rebecca Walter Table 2. Teachers involved in the piloting at UPF The activities created by the UPF team that have been piloted include the following foreign languages: English, German, (Spanish and Catalan). The piloting project was carried out April to June 2014. The July 2014 Page | 36
  • 37. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report main questions of the research where; how can ClipFlair be implemented into a university context and iIs its implementation useful for the students. On a theoretical level, the activity tried to look at the competencies it could potentially foster and finally asked for the motivational component and on what students thought about the activity. The particularities of the project were the work with students from different undergraduate studies (Applied Languages and Translation Studies) and having one group translating between two foreign languages (L3 and L4 for most of the students). The UPF team used the social network of the Clipflair platform during the pilot lessons both for revoicing and captioning. The following groups were created: Group 1 Group 2 Studies Applied Languages Translation Group profiles 2nd year, 24 students (in-course obligatory participation) 3rd year, 11 students (voluntary participation) Language profiles Majority bilingual (ES/CAT) Learn several foreign languages Majority bilingual (ES/CAT) Learn several foreign languages Activities -Creating conversation in German (Written to be spoken: modal particles) -Subsequent revoicing (error correction) Translating German dialogue into English (Captioning) Competencies used -Plurilingual competence - Multiliteracy competence -Plurilingual competence -Multiliteracy competence Table 3. The two groups involved and their activities The overall responses to the use of ClipFlair were very positive. The UPF team could also detect some issues as on how to implement the tool and on how much “control” and observation by the teaching staff is required so they don’t give up due to technical problems. Below the results of some of the questionnaires, separated by groups: July 2014 Page | 37
  • 38. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report July 2014 Page | 38
  • 39. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report July 2014 Page | 39
  • 40. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Below are screenshots of the two activities created on the ClipFlair platform: July 2014 Page | 40
  • 41. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 2.4.3 Imperial College London (ICL) and University College London (UCL) ICL and UCL have carried out the piloting of activities in a variety of contexts: with undergraduate and postgraduate students, with primary and secondary school students, and with independent learners. However, it should be noted that we have encountered many issues to implement the piloting of activities as expected due to the transfer of the Translation Studies Unit from Imperial College London to University College London. As a result of the transfer, the team has not been able to rely on the support of language tutors teaching Arabic, Chinese, Portuguese and Japanese (who stayed at Imperial College London) to pilot activities. This is the main reason why most of the activities piloted by UCL are Spanish activities, as this was the language taught by members of staff who were transferred to UCL. The team attempted to involve tutors from the new institution for the piloting of activities, but this was not possible given the time frame, and given that teaching finished in March. As a result, an attempt has been made to involve independent learners, who have been mainly contacted through social media. The purpose of this section is to provide detailed information about the piloting activities carried out at UCL and with independent learners. Since the activities carried out at ICL have been included in the final report, these will not be discussed here. Piloting carried out by UCL Piloting activities with translation students at UCL On the 23rd of March 2014, Rocío Baños, from the UCL team, piloted the activity http://studio.clipflair.net/?activity=Friends_en_Rev_C1_ANY.clipflair with 30 students of the MSc in Scientific, Technical and Medical Translation at UCL. The activity was integrated in the module Translating for Voiceover and Dubbing, where students translate a wide range of audiovisual material for the purposes of voiceover and dubbing. In this activity students were asked to translate the clip for dubbing, making sure the translated dialogues sounded natural and spontaneous, and then to revoice the dialogues to find out if their translation fitted in the space provided, and to make sure that it sounded natural. Students translated into a wide range of languages: Chinese, Spanish, Italian, Polish and Portuguese. The session lasted 2 hours, and the activity was introduced in the last 40 minutes. As there was not enough time for students to complete the task in class, they were asked to finish it at home, to post it on ClipFlair Social Network, and to complete the feedback form. No major issues were experienced during the piloting. There were only minor issues with the revoicing component (some fragments were recorded but could not be heard by students, and there was some overlapping between July 2014 Page | 41
  • 42. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report fragments). These issues were reported after the session and looked into by the ClipFlair team in charge of the platform’s development. A couple of days after piloting the activity, a reminder was sent asking students to complete the activity and to fill in the feedback form (see Appendix 1). Since not many students filled in the feedback form, feedback was sought informally when meeting students in other lectures. Overall, students liked ClipFlair Studio and some of them even tried to complete other activities available in the Gallery. Both during and after the piloting session, some students mentioned that they were not comfortable listening to their own voice. Some mentioned they were not comfortable recording audio in class, but that they felt more at ease doing the recording at home. Piloting Spanish activities at Lawdale Junior School On the 23rd of May 2014, Marga Navarrete, from the UCL team, ran four sessions at Lawdale Junior School. Four different sessions were held: two with Y4 students (8-9 years old kids) and two with Y5 students (9-10 years old kids). Each session was attended by about 28-30 pupils. Two different activities to learn Spanish, designed for primary school children were tested: http://studio.clipflair.net/?activity=Lucas_y_sus_hermanos_Cap-A1A2-SP.clipflair and http://studio.clipflair.net/?activity=Lucas_y_sus_hermanos_Rev-A1A2-SP.clipflair. The activities consisted of a short clip where an eight year-old boy was interviewed about personal information, family and leisure activities. Pupils really enjoyed the clip (because it was filmed in their local park and also because they could easily relate to the boy in the clip). In the first activity children had to complete the captions, and in the second, they had to dub the main character and change his responses with their own personal information. The first activity was very successful, most students managed to complete it, and there were no technical problems of any sort. Also, they found ClipFlair Studio easy to use and enjoyed writing the captions. However, when a group of pupils tried to test the second activity based on a revoicing task, problems arose, and none of the students managed to complete the activity successfully. The school borrowed the microphones from another school, and they had not tested them properly, the settings were slightly wrong, so most microphones did not work properly. Although pupils enjoyed the clip, and learnt a lot from it, not being able to complete their task was frustrating. Almost a hundred students tested these activities. However, there was not enough time to fill in the learner feedback. As it was an online form, some links had to be typed in and there were a lot of questions to be responded to in a very short period of time. For this reason, the teacher assistant and the UCL tutor piloting the activity July 2014 Page | 42
  • 43. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report helped a few students to complete the form, but unfortunately, not as many as we would have liked to. Use of ClipFlair Social Network The UCL team has also made use of the social part of the Clipflair platform, mainly through the creation of the group MSc Translation UCL. Piloting with independent learners Independent learners were contacted both directly and through social media in order to be able to gather relevant feedback about the platform and about specific activities targeted at independent learners. UCL tutors were also encouraged to ask language learners to test some activities as independent learners. A key aspect raised informally by learners was obtaining support while carrying out the activity. Some learners found the available video tutorials and the manual useful, but others preferred to be able to access this material in their main language, an issue which has been addressed in the project. Another issue raised was obtaining feedback after completing the activity: leaners particularly appreciated being able to check a document with solutions or sample answers. Again, feedback from learners was frequently gathered informally, but some of the responses obtained during the last stages of the project are available in Appendix 2. July 2014 Page | 43
  • 44. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 2.4.4 Universitatea „Babeș-Bolyai”, Cluj-Napoca, Romania (UBB) UBB Cluj-Napoca carried out its piloting activity in different contexts: high school students, university students, MA degree students, and professors. Summary of figures related to the Clipflair Project by UAB 84 activities created 30 activities piloted 394 questionnaires 394 questionnaires answered 9 teachers involved in the creation of activities 7 teachers involved in the piloting Table 2 Summary of UBB team work Apart from the nine UBB teachers who are members of the Clipflair project and have been in charge of creating and piloting activities, there have been four other high school teachers who have piloted our activities. Two of these teachers belong to the Colegiul Național „Emil Racoviță” (CNER); the others belong to Seminarul Teologic Ortodox (STO) and Liceul Teoretic „Mihai Eminescu” (LTME) Cluj-Napoca. The following table summarizes these figures: Clipflair members and UBB staff Secondary school teachers Cristina Varga Diana Todoran (CNER) July 2014 Page | 44
  • 45. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Clipflair members and UBB staff Secondary school teachers Cristina Felea Irina Nădășan (LTME) Adriana Neagu Nicoleta Popa (STO) Liana Muthu Sanda Moraru Alexandra Cotoc Anamaria Radu Table 3. Teachers involved in the piloting at UBB The activities created by the UBB team that have been piloted include the following foreign languages: English, Spanish, Romanian, Catalan, Russian, and Ukrainian. The Russian pilot activities were postponed by Russian Language and Literature Department of UBB by October 2014 and will be carried out as soon as possible. One activity in Norwegian which is not published for the moment in the Clipflair gallery was also carried out because the Nordic Languages Department of UBB would like to involve Clipflair platform in a Norwegian learning project, they will submit by the end of 2014. July 2014 Page | 45
  • 46. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Figure 1. Use of ClipFlair social network by UBB users Figure 2. Use of ClipFlair social network by college students in Cluj-Napoca The UBB team used the social network of the Clipflair platform during the pilot lessons especially for upload the activities of the students. It has resulted in the creation of following groups (the number of members for each group is also mentioned): • UBB (217); • Romanian; July 2014 Page | 46
  • 47. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report • Ukrainian; • Russian; • English; • Spanish; • Catalan; • CNER (62); • STO (18); • Liceul Teorectic „Mihai Eminescu” (14); • NTLD2014 (18); Therefore, UBB users are organised in 5 main groups and 329 members. Finally, the UBB team has contacted different authorities: • Head of Russian Cultural Center in Cluj-Napoca: Iudith Bartalis; • Head of Liceul Teoretic “Mihai Eminescu”: Dobrescu Simona Raluca Below are some pictures of the piloting of activities at the UBB. Please find more on the Clipflair Social Network, group UBB. July 2014 Page | 47
  • 48. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report July 2014 Page | 48
  • 49. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 2.4.5 University of Deusto The University of Deusto has collaborated with the Kurutziaga School of Durango to design and test activities. These activities have been developed in Basque. Kurutziaga school is an Associated Partner in ClipFlair project. Other activities have been piloted at the University of Deusto with students from “Euskal Irakaslegoa”, the Basque language school. Kurutziaga School students who participated in the pilot are in fifth and sixth grade, so they are under 13 years. Pilot data The following table shows the list of activities in Basque that have been tested, the number of learners who have tested each activity, the educational institution and the teacher responsible for each piloting activity. Title of activity (URL link) Number of Learners Center Teacher Responsible NOR NAIZ NI?: http://studio.clipflair.net/?activity= UD_euskera_nornaizni.clipflair 9 Kurutziaga School Gaizka Uriarte MARITEILETAKOAREN IPUINA: http://studio.clipflair.net/?activ ity=UD_euskera_mariteiletako.clipflair 8 Kurutziaga School Gaizka Uriarte GABONAK, OLENTZEROAREN KANTAK: http://studio.clipflair.net/?act ivity=Kurutziaga_euskera_gabonak.clipflai r 6 Kurutziaga School Gaizka Uriarte SURRANDIAK: http://studio.clipflair.ne t/?activity=Kurutziaga_euskera_Surrandia k.clipflair 18 Kurutziaga School Gaizka Uriarte ZEZENAK DIRA: http://studio.clipflair.net/?activity 9 Kurutziaga School Gaizka Uriarte July 2014 Page | 49
  • 50. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report =Kurutziaga_euskera_zezenakdira.clipflair OLENTZEROREN ISTORIOA: http://studio.clipflair.net/?a ctivity=Kurutziaga_Olentzeroren_istorioa. clipflair 1 Kurutziaga School Gaizka Uriarte LAZKAO TXIKI: http://studio.clipflair.net/?activit y=Kurutziaga_euskera_Lazkao_txiki.clipfla ir 10 Kurutziaga School Gaizka Uriarte ITSUTUTA ABENTURA: http://studio.clipflair.net/ ?activity=UD_euskera_itsututa.clipflair 2 Kurutziaga School Gaizka Uriarte BIZKAIAN TURISMOA EGITEN: http://studio.clipflair.net/?acti vity=UD_euskera_bizkaia.clipflair 4 University of Deusto Iratxe Mentxaka KUTSADURA: http://studio.clipflair.net /?activity=UD_euskera_bizkaia.clipflair 5 University of Deusto Iratxe Mentxaka Table 1: List of piloting activities In conclusion, we have tested 10 ClipFlair activities in Basque and 72 students have participated. Teachers´ comments After the piloting, teachers gave us feedback about their experience using ClipFlair. • It´s difficult to test an activity when students have to record the voice with a microphone, because there are multiple students in the same classroom and it is noisy. • In their opinion, there should be an option to lock the edited activity, because sometimes students close a window and it´s not possible to recover it. • They suggest including in the activity the auto-save option, to avoid losing information. • It would be very useful to use videos from YouTube, without downloading. July 2014 Page | 50
  • 51. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report • It would be very interesting to include external activities, such as Hot potatoes or Google Form, without the need to get out of ClipFlair. • It would be interesting to have more activity-models and examples. • Finally, teachers pointed out that they consider useful ClipFlair Studio to work areas such as listening, translation or pronunciation. July 2014 Page | 51
  • 52. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 2.4.6 University of Tallinn TLU carried out its piloting activity in two different contexts: secondary school students and university students. Figures related to the Clipflair Project by Tallinn University 22 activities created 2 activities piloted 26 questionnaires answered 2 teachers involved in the creation of activities 3 teachers involved in the piloting The activites were created and piloted by project partners Kristiina Rebane, Kristiina Tedremaa – Levorato, Markus Oder, piloting in the secondary school was carried out by teacher Vittoriano Reno. The piloting took place in Tallinn University. The feedback from the students was mostly positive. The problems occurring were mostly technical (Silverlight installation, Macintosh). To encourage the Estonian foreign language teachers (FL) to start using audiovisual material in their classes we have been introducing Clipflair project on different occasions: 1. Tallinn Winter School 2013 (07.01 – 25.01.2013). 2. International education day 21.02.2013. A newsstand of different language study options was put up at the university for secondary school students. CLIPFLAIR leaflets were distributed and a mini-lesson was conducted on TV. July 2014 Page | 52
  • 53. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 3. TLU Open doors day 15.03.2013 where the prospective students (secondary school students now) were introduced to the study possibilities at our university. There was an excursion to the language centre, during which Clipflair project was introduced and leaflets distributed. 4. TLU Summer School 2013 (15.07 - 02.08.2013). Target group are foreigners who study Estonian. We targeted about 60 students of Estonian at elementary level. 5. Foreign language teachers methodology days at Tallinn University 22.11.2013 (98 participants). 6. TLU days at our partner schools (students of secondary school, about 1000 students). Autumn 2013. 7. Presenting Clipflair to TLU Institute of Estonian Language and Culture foreign language teachers. 12.12.2013. 8. TLU Winter School 2014 (06.01 – 24.01.2014). Target groups are foreigners who study Estonian. We targeted about 35 students of Estonian at elementary level. 9. Tallinn University Language Centre international conference of foreign languages methodology (about 100 teachers) that was held in 04.04.2014. July 2014 Page | 53
  • 54. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 10.TLU Summer School 2014 (14.07 – 31.07.2014). Target group are foreigners who study Estonian. We targeted about 40 students of Estonian (elementary and intermediate levels). July 2014 Page | 54
  • 55. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 2.4.7 University of Warsaw Pilot study report The report aims to present the evaluation procedures undertaken by University of Warsaw as part of the ClipFlair project and also to explain the lack of the data from pupils and teachers’ evaluation forms in the project database. Students’ involvement at the pre-pilot stage Students of the Institute of Linguistics, University of Warsaw, have been involved in the project work since the beginning of the project. In October2012, a group of 110 students of the Institute of Linguistics, University of Warsaw, were introduced to the idea of Clipflair (CF). 60 of them were involved in the creation of video clips for the project. They worked in groups of four. Due to various levels of technical and content quality, four clips (Święconka, Pyszna zapiekanka, Abecadło Ślubnych obrzędów, Polskie tańce narodowe) were uploaded to the ClipFlair video gallery and used for Cliplair activities. First piloting stage At the first piloting stage in 2013 (summer semester 2012/13) the piloting process of ClipFlair activities took place at the Faculty of Polish at the University of Warsaw. 20 students of extramural studies for teachers of Polish as a foreign language used the activities and evaluated them. However, both their academic supervisor and the students refused to fill in CF evaluation forms. They sent evaluation reports to the supervisor and to the Polish partners as written commentaries (see file: Teachers of Polish commenatries March 2013). In their evaluation, the teachers appreciated the attractive and innovative approach to teaching and learning languages, but they also emphasised the technical problems at that stage. They looked at them in a very creative way and suggested other ways the clips could be used for other linguistic and cultural purposes. They stressed that the activities need to be ordered in a traditional way which is clear to the teachers and students: separation of grammar tasks from discussion tasks, clear introductory and revision tasks. They used ClipFlair activities willingly to get to know its idea and implementation, but all explained that as the activities were available on the Internet for free, filling in the forms for the sake of bureaucratic CF procedures were not meaningful to them at all. Their supervisor participated in the evaluation interview and she said that for some teachers of Polish the technology is still a barrier. She asked for authoring tools to July 2014 Page | 55
  • 56. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report make teachers more autonomous in creating activities and adopting them to the students’ needs. As far as the language level was concerned, she opted for activities forA1 and A2 only because most of the teachers of Polish as a foreign language need materials for these levels. For higher levels they may use other materials such as copies of commercial clips. She also complained about the quality of the clip about Warsaw, and some colloquial linguistic forms used in the activity instruction, which are not accepted by Polish purist teachers as they may be misleading to students of Polish as a foreign language. A teacher at a lower secondary school in Warsaw piloted some activities with 50 students (2 classes). She was interviewed for evaluation, but again neither she nor her students were willing to fill in any evaluation forms. They simply treated the activities as part of the Internet resources, and used them in the way they wanted without an extra effort unrelated to learning and teaching. She tried activities based on Rosetta Stone’s clip from the Khan Academy as it related to the topics they worked on History class. Although the students are familiar with the topic, the language level was too high for them. However, she evaluated ClipFlair activities as an interesting approach to learning and teaching. 50 third-year students of the Institute Applied Linguistics Bachelor Programme participating in a course Methodology of teaching English (pre-service teachers of the following languages (French, German, Spanish and Russian)) were shown how to use audiovisual materials in ClipFlair activities to develop all four language skills and audiovisual skills. As the group was big, 27 students, and the computer lab is only for 20, they could use the activities at home computers, because ClipFlair was not available at their mobile devices in class. As the classes did not take place in the computer laboratory, group work was only possible. In class they were discussing activities based on Maggie the Witch and Rosetta Stone clips. The evaluation was done in the form of focus group interviews. The students presented balanced opinions. On the one hand, they appreciated the interactivity of the tasks, and the clear and natural context for language learning, e.g. a visit in the museum in the Rosetta Stone video. On the other hand, they noticed the gap between the time pupils get to know about the Rosetta Stone at school and their language level not high enough to understand the text with ease. The second piloting stage Winter semester 2013/14. July 2014 Page | 56
  • 57. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report The students of the Institute of Applied Linguistics were involved at the piloting stage at different levels and through different courses. 110 participated in a course Intermedial Teaching of Languages at the University of Warsaw Masters Programme. They were introduced to the ClipFlair project aims and activities. As the course was based on students’ access to their own mobile devices (Bring your own device approach), some of them couldn’t get access to ClipFlair activities through Android or iOS system on tablets in class. They all joined the ClipFlair community at social group Students at Warsaw University and their evaluation of various ClipFlair activities prepared in various languages is available there. The course puts emphasis on reflective and autonomous approach to learning and teaching. Thus, forms of documenting work were negotiated with the students. Oout of thetwo forms of evaluating the activities social media or forms, they chose social media as more qualitative. One of them reported later in an informal talk with the teacher that she used ClipFlair activities with some of her private learners, and they found them attractive, enjoyable and effective. 50 third-year students of the Institute Applied Linguistics Bachelor Programme participating in the course Evaluation in glottodidactics (pre-service teachers of English) evaluated various elements of ClipFlair activities separately and activities as such. The ClipFlair activities were introduced to illustrate evaluation of audiovisual materials, listening and writing activities as well as audiovisual writing and speaking. The criteria for evaluating clips worked out within ClipFlair methodology were introduced as general tools for clip evaluation. They evaluated the clips as audiovisual materials to be used in language teaching and learning. They were all given the ClipFlair evaluation form address but they did not use it. 10 of the students provided written report as a document for their extra voluntary work. They are available in the zip file: Students’ evaluation October November 2013. They also evaluated ClipFlair activities, in group discussions in class, from the perspective of developing different skills as part of the use of various class tasks, but they did not prepare any written documents to summarise the results of the discussions. They also evaluated the authoring functionalities of the portal from the perspective of teachers who wanted to create their own activities. The appreciated the idea of using either films prepared by students or with students from the workstation without the need to publish them on the Internet. Summer semester 2013/14 July 2014 Page | 57
  • 58. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Course in Current tendencies in glottodidactics – lecture 130 students participated in the course. ClipFlair was used to illustrate current trends in methodology of teaching languages. However, because of the type of the course, that is the lecture, the students did not use ClipFlair activities in class. They evaluated the activities in the interactive way during the lecture. At this stage of their professional development, they could evaluate the materials both from the students’ perspective and from the teacher’s perspective. And it turned out the perspectives differ. As students they were positive about the idea of using audiovisual materials by adding captioning and revoicing. They stressed the role of interlingual translation in learning with audiovisual materials. However, as teachers they would recommend the materials to pupils for individual work at home, but in class they will use them only on the condition they had easy access to computers, which is unlikely, and if the pupils were computer literate enough to focus on the language task. As the only course requirement for them was to pass the final exam at the end of the semester, it was impossible to ask them to formally evaluate the activities through filling in the ClipFlair forms. The table below presents the number of users involved in the creation and evaluation of ClipFlair activities Stage Time Number of secondary school students Number of in-service teachers Number of pre-service teachers Production Winter sem.2012/2013 0 0 60 First piloting Summer sem. 2012/13 50 20 150 Second piloting stage Winter sem. 2013/2014 0 0 160 Second piloting stage Summer 0 0 130 July 2014 Page | 58
  • 59. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report sem.2013/2014 Total 50 20 500 Final explanations To explain the context and reasons why students and teachers refused to fill in the evaluation forms, it is worth mentioning that in those days they were paid for participation in another project, and they also regularly received money for participation in surveys introduced by marketing companies. Thus, they were willingly learning the methodology how to use audiovisual materials in language learning, how to use interactive learning environment for learning and teaching languages, how to include multimodal translation into teaching and learning with technology, but they were not willing to invest their time and effort in filling in project questionnaires for free. As the activities were available on the Internet, the pupils used them in a way they wanted. At the institutional level it was also discussed to include the use of a ClipFlair activity as an obligatory task for one lesson taught by pre-service teachers during their pedagogical internship, which takes place in either primary or secondary schools. The university internship supervisors, after consultations with mentors at schools, refused to include this task, because of technical problems. The mentors were not able to provide the students with access to school computer laboratory. As the requirements for all students have to be the same, the task was not implemented. A teacher training centre in Warsaw was asked to include the ClipFlair activities in their teacher training courses. They refused to do it as they had to follow a strict plan and syllabi of the courses which had been approved the management team and the supervising local authorities a year before. As the reflective and autonomous approach to teacher training is implemented in some of the courses presented above, the students have a selection of tasks to be done as course requirements, or optional forms of documenting the work done with the emphasis on how meaningful the task is for them. They selected a narrative form of evaluation in a social group as more meaningful than filling project forms. Conclusions July 2014 Page | 59
  • 60. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report The project activities were introduced to 20 teachers of Polish as a foreign language, 50 pupils and 500 students of the Institute of Applied Linguistics and evaluated by them with the use of various qualitative tools, e.g. ClipFlair social group, interviews, focus group interviews, class discussions. The evaluation is more qualitative than quantitative in its nature, but well fitted to the course requirements and conditions. From this perspective, qualitative evaluation is complementary to quantitative one done by other partners. This also shows that ClipFlair activities may constitute a part of regular methodology courses for pre-service teachers of languages without changing syllabi of such courses. Piloting ClipFlair activities with pre-service teachers of various languages adds an extra value to the implementation of ClipFlair project results, which can also be perceived as extra unpredicted result of the ClipFlair project. July 2014 Page | 60
  • 61. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 2.4.8 National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI Galway) NUI Galway carried out its piloting activity in a variety of contexts: with undergraduate university students, independent learners, adult learners in e-learning environments and secondary school students. Summary of figures related to the ClipFlair Project by NUI Galway 28 activities created + 15 extra activities created for Italian, 1 French, 1 German* 24 activities piloted Students involved: approx. 400 students (some of these students tested several activities) questionnaires answered: 54 ** 8 teachers and students involved in the creation of activities 5 teachers involved in the piloting with students 3 extra teachers were involved in the peer-review process and also individually piloted Irish activities (Lisa Ní Fhlatharta, Belinda McHale & Fiona Ní Chualáin) Table 1. Summary of NUI Galway team work * Additional activities in French and German were created specifically for piloting purposes with Mercy College Secondary School. **Because some activities were tested in tandem with Associate Partners (specifically Università degli Studi di Pavia and Uned, many answered questionnaires do not include reference to NUI Galway or to one of our teachers, for that reason they are not included here). July 2014 Page | 61
  • 62. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report In addition to the three NUI Galway teachers who are members of the ClipFlair project, one additional teacher (Dr Jennifer Lertola) created and piloted activities with both teacher-dependent and independent learners. In particular, during the Academic Year 2013-2014, Dr Lertola carried out a two-semester pilot of activities with online mature students in order to test the feasibility of use of ClipFlair in e-learning environments. This was successful and it will be repeated again during the Academic Year 2014-2015. 13 students participated in this pilot, which tested 9 different activities, for a total of 117 tests. Two more teachers (Sara Buscio and Alessandro Luchetti) piloted activities within NUI Galway, while three others peer-reviewed and carried out individual pilots of some of the Irish-language activities. A student (Sinéad Nic Aodha) and two other members of staff (Éamon Ó Cofaigh, Pilar Alderete-Díez) also helped in the creation of a couple of the activities. Outside NUI Galway, our activities were piloted at the following institutions: - Dublin Institute of Technology - Mercy College Secondary School, Sligo - Kazimierz Wielki University, Bydgoszcz, Poland - Università degli Studi di Pavia, Italy (in collaboration with Associate Partner), - Europass, Florence, Italy - Uned, Madrid (in collaboration with Associate Partner) Clipflair members NUI Galway teachers Outside NUI Galway Laura McLoughlin Jennifer Lertola Dublin Institute of Technology Dorothy Ní Uigín Sara Buscio Mercy College, Sligo (secondary school) Rose Ní Dhubhda Alessandro Luchetti Kazimierz Wielki University, Bydgoszcz, Poland Università degli Studi di Pavia, Italy Europass, Florence, Italy July 2014 Page | 62
  • 63. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report Clipflair members NUI Galway teachers Outside NUI Galway Uned, Madrid, Spain Table 2. Teachers and centres involved in the piloting by NUI Galway Unfortunately not all students completed a feedback questionnaire or registered in the Social. In the case of the Mercy College Secondary School, teachers advised us that they were not in favour of the registration of under-age students. In other cases, for example the online course, the same students were involved in the pilot of several activities during two semesters. These students registered and filled in questionnaires only once. The activities piloted by the NUI Galway team (also in close collaboration with Associate Partners) include a number of languages to reflect the interests of the students involved in the pilot. They include the following languages and language combinations: ANY LANGUAGE - 1 ENGLISH – intralingual - 13 IRISH – intralingual - 3 ITALIAN – intralingual 15 ENGLISH-ITALIAN - 10 ENGLISH-FRENCH 1 ENGLISH-GERMAN 1 SPANISH - 1 Use of ClipFlair social network The NUI Galway team has also made use of the social part of the Clipflair platform. It has resulted in the creation of the following groups: • NUIG 17 July 2014 Page | 63
  • 64. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report • Learning English 9 • Learning Irish 3 • Italian is fun 22 • Bydgoszcz 6 • UNED 65 (In collaboration with Associate Partner) • Commercials to Learn English 2 (In collaboration with Associate Partner) • RECORDS Project 9 (In collaboration with Associate Partner) While piloting activities in the Mercy College Secondary School and presenting ClipFlair to the language teachers, it was discovered that the www.clipflair.net website was not accessible from within the school. The teachers explained that, for security reasons, only approved websites can be accessed from within schools and provided contact details so that the ClipFlair website could be proposed for addition to the list. The PDST (Technology in Education Section) was therefore contacted, www.clipflair.net was vetted, approved and added to the list and it is now accessible from all secondary schools in Ireland. Finally, the NUI Galway team has contacted a number of different players in the field of Education, who have multiplying capacity – the School of Education within our own university for example; a national organisation – the Professional Development Service for Teachers (PDST) as well as some individual players (teachers, schools etc). Some have become Associate Partners while the project was being developed: • One Voice for Languages (Associate Partner) • Association of Teachers of Italian (Associate Partner) In addition, the following bodies were Associate Partners from the beginning of the project: • Post-Primary Initiative for Languages • An Chomhairle um Oideachas Gaeltachta & Gaelscolaíochta (COGG) July 2014 Page | 64
  • 65. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 3 COMPARISON BETWEEN PILOT PHASES To conclude we will briefly compare the data obtained after the two pilot phases. It has to be noted that not all users at the pilot phase completed the questionnaire, which means that the below results are partial. The complete results are presented in section 2.4 Pilot use by partner. 3.1 Participating Institutions The number of participating centres in the second pilot phase were twice as many in relation to those participating in the first pilot phase: from 7 to 16. In the first pilot phase all centres were universities, mostly ClipFlair partners. In the second phase, besides 10 university partners, 3 more universities participated, plus 2 primary schools and 1 high school. 3.2 Participants The number of teachers piloting activities also doubled: from 18 to 37. The number of questionnaires answered by students, i.e., completed activities, increased from 318 to 1173. 3.3 Activities The number of activities piloted in the second phase increased tremendously. The quantity of piloted activities in the second phase (84) is four times larger than that of the first phase (20). The range of languages worked on in the activities almost doubled, going from 7 to 12. It is worth highlighting that only 20.7% of activities were designed to practise English, 13.8% were designed to practise non-European languages (Chinese, Japanese and Arabic), and 13% were designed to practise translation (different language combinations). July 2014 Page | 65
  • 66. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report 3.4 Teachers' results The data obtained from the first and second pilot phases are very similar as far as teachers' results are concerned. The results for the questionsWhere did students do the activity? and How often teachers use audiovisual materials? are almost identical to those in the interim report. RegardingTechnical problems, a decrease of 3% has been observed. 3.5 Students' results The most relevant data observed when comparing the first and second pilot phases is the big increase in the number of activities completed (as observed in the increased number of questionnaires filled in by students, going from 318 to 1173). Another relevant piece of data is the students' country of origin and age. In relation to origin, students participating in the first pilot phase came from 17 different countries, while there were 30 different countries in the second phase. Regarding students' age, the fact that in the second phase primary and secondary students took part in the piloting, has made this data change, with the range of 18-35 years of age representing 93% in the first phase and 74% in the second. July 2014 Page | 66
  • 67. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report APPENDIX 1. Teachers’ questionnaire July 2014 Page | 67
  • 68. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report July 2014 Page | 68
  • 69. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report July 2014 Page | 69
  • 70. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report APPENDIX 2. Students’ questionnaire July 2014 Page | 70
  • 71. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report July 2014 Page | 71
  • 72. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report July 2014 Page | 72
  • 73. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report July 2014 Page | 73
  • 74. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report APPENDIX 3. Pictures from piloted activities Some teachers took pictures during the piloting of activities in the language labs. Here are some examples. July 2014 Page | 74
  • 75. D5.1b. ClipFlair Pilot Use Report APPENDIX 4: Reminder sent to students via email July 2014 Page | 75
  • 76. Banos Pinero, Rocio From: Banos Pinero, Rocio Sent: 26 March 2014 10:15 To: Felices Gutierrez, Ana; Barcena Panero, Ana; Zamagni, Benedetta; Gioia, Cecilia; Song, Chang; Di Stadio, Elisabetta; Zhang, Feifei; Zhou, Heran; Chen, I-Chun; Fang, Jing; Acha Villaro, Judit; Filicicchia, Laura; Kozinski, Marcin; Napoli, Marianna; Cecino, Martina; Zhang, Qian; Banos Pinero, Rocio; Chen, Ran; Piras, Simona; Haro Guerra, Sofia; Poerschke Freitas, Thaise; Ning, Tianbai; Gaudenzi, Valeria; Labianca, Viviana; Cai, Wangyu; Zhou, Wei; Tan, Tina; Jin, Xinchun; Ni, Sharon; Peng, Yao; Zhao, Yingwen; Chou, Yu-Hua; Liang, Zhenming Cc: Navarrete Ramirez-Montesinos, Marga Subject: IMPORTANT: TRANG012 Task to be completed Dear all, This is a reminder about the ClipFlair task to be completed for TRANG012. I know it’s a long email, but please read it to the end. What do you have to do? 1) Translate Friends dialogue into your target language, making sure that your translation contains features typical of spontaneous conversation. For this you will have to follow these steps: a. Open the activity by going to http://studio.clipflair.net/?activity=Friends_en_Rev_C1_ANY.clipflair b. If you want to carry on where you left it on Monday, load your work there by clicking on the button Load Activity from file, at the bottom of the screen . Select the file you saved after the session on Monday. It will 1 have a .clipflair extension. c. If you prefer to, you can start from scratch. In this case, make sure you save your work frequently by clicking on the floppy disk icon. When resaving your work, it will ask you to replace the file you created the first time you saved it, which is fine. d. Carry on with your work: enter the translation in the caption spaces provided (the timing has been set up for you, but you can change this if you want to). Remember that this text is not for subtitling in this case, but to help you record the dialogue. e. Once you have entered your translation, revoice each of the captions separately by clicking on the recording button ( ). When you have finished reading your translation aloud, click on . f. You don’t have to play the video as you record! g. Once you have recorded a few utterances, click on Play to see how your translation will sound. Bear in mind that synchronisation won’t be perfect, but this is not important here (you’re not a voice talent!). What matters is that you realise: 1) if your translation sounds oral; 2) if your translation fits within the time given. 2) IMPORTANT: Fill in the feedback form available at: http://tinyurl.com/clipflairfeedback. This is very important as it will enable us to improve the platform to be able to use it for teaching purposes. By filling in this form you will be contributing to the ClipFlair project by helping to develop this free online and easy to use platform for subtitling and dubbing! ***When filling in this form, you will be asked to include the name of the tutor (Rocío Banos), as well as the URL of the activity: http://studio.clipflair.net/?activity=Friends_en_Rev_C1_ANY.clipflair 3) OPTIONAL: Upload your activity in ClipFlair Social Network a. Go to http://social.clipflair.net/. b. If you haven't registered yet, do so by clicking on http://social.clipflair.net/login.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2f. c. Go to the MSc Translation group and post your activity there.
  • 77. Why should I post my activity there? I’ll try my best to make sure that feedback is provided to those who post their activities on the platform. Also, you will be able to check what other peers have done and learn from others’ work. 2 If you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact me! I hope you enjoy working with ClipFlair. Rocío Dr Rocío Baños Lecturer in Translation Centre for Translation Studies (CenTraS) University College London Room 206, 50 Gordon Square London WC1H 0PQ Tel. +44 (0)2076799361 r.banos@ucl.ac.uk http://www.ucl.ac.uk/centras