Ccpea pw-master august-2006

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Ccpea pw-master august-2006

  1. 1. Participant’s WorkbookClient Casework: Providing Emergency AssistanceDSCLS202AAugust 2006
  2. 2. Client Casework:Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  3. 3. DSCLS202AClient Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance© Copyright August 2006 The American National Red CrossLearning and Development, Training and Leadership Development
  4. 4. Table of ContentsAcknowledgements................................................................................................................... viiAbout This Course.................................................................................................................... 1Course Purpose...................................................................................................................................... 1Course Objectives.................................................................................................................................. 1Course Overview................................................................................................................................... 2Course Length........................................................................................................................................ 2Participant’s Workbook.......................................................................................................................... 2Segment 1: Overview of Client Casework................................................................ 1-1Objectives.............................................................................................................................................. 1-1The Disaster Services Human Resources (DSHR) System................................................................... 1-2DSHR Positions..................................................................................................................................... 1-2Individual Client Services Group.......................................................................................................... 1-2 .The Role of Client Casework. ............................................................................................................... 1-5 .The Responsibilities of Client Casework. ............................................................................................. 1-5 .The Commitment and Values of Client Casework. ............................................................................... 1-6 .Addressing Disaster-caused Emergency Needs..................................................................................... 1-7Providing Standardized Assistance........................................................................................................ 1-8Welfare Information and Family Reunification..................................................................................... 1-9Collaboration with Other DSHR Groups and Activities........................................................................ 1-10Segment 2: The Interview. ................................................................................................... 2-1Objectives.............................................................................................................................................. 2-1Conducting Client Interviews................................................................................................................ 2-2Providing Assistance.............................................................................................................................. 2-5Documenting the Interview and Assistance Provided........................................................................... 2-7Client Assistance System....................................................................................................................... 2-7Completing a Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form 901)....................................................... 2-8Forms Used with Form 901................................................................................................................... 2-17Client Assistance Cards ........................................................................................................................ 2-18Disbursing Orders (Form 140C) .......................................................................................................... 2-23DSCLS202A iiiAugust 2006
  5. 5. Table of ContentsSegment 3: Assignment Settings....................................................................................... 3-1Objectives.............................................................................................................................................. 3-1Office Settings....................................................................................................................................... 3-2 .Field Settings......................................................................................................................................... 3-3Shelters.................................................................................................................................................. 3-3 .Segment 4: Skills Drill............................................................................................................ 4-1Objectives.............................................................................................................................................. 4-1Skills Drill Overview............................................................................................................................. 4-3Part 1: Conducting an Initial Client Interview....................................................................................... 4-4Part 2: Preparing a Narrative Statement................................................................................................ 4-8 .Part 3: Providing Assistance.................................................................................................................. 4-10Part 4: Conducting a Follow-up Interview and Providing Additional Assistance................................. 4-12Segment 5: Let’s Get Started............................................................................................. 5-1Objectives.............................................................................................................................................. 5-1Developing an Action Plan.................................................................................................................... 5-2Participant ResourcesA. Sample Disaster Registration and Case File (Form 901)............................................................... A-1 .B. Sample Narrative Statements .......................................................................................................... B-1C. Sample Client Assistance Authorization (Form 1030)..................................................................... C-1D. Sample Disbursing Order (Form 140C).......................................................................................... D-1E. Welfare Information Overview. ....................................................................................................... E-1 .F. Form 901 - CAS Data Entry Quick Finder....................................................................................... F-1G. Red Cross Values and Guiding Behaviors........................................................................................ G-1iv Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Manual
  6. 6. AcknowledgementsThis course and the accompanying materials for Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistancewere developed through the dedicated combined efforts of many American Red Cross employees andvolunteers. The supportive, technical and creative suggestions from a number of individuals made theseprint materials possible.Responsible for the instructional design and writing of this course and accompanying materials wereNancy Edmonds, Senior Associate and S. Elizabeth White, Senior Consultant of the Learning andDevelopment unit, Training Development and Delivery, American Red Cross, Washington, DC. Thefollowing American Red Cross volunteers and employees were responsible for the technical input andguidance: Jack Ferguson, Volunteer, Dallas Area Chapter, Dallas, TX; Joni Eaton, Volunteer, SoutheastLouisiana Chapter, New Orleans, LA; Janet Lee Hensley, Volunteer, Centennial Chapter, Fort Collins,CO; Chris Manning, Volunteer, San Diego Imperial Counties Chapter, San Diego, CA; CharlotteSimpson, Volunteer, Madison-Marshall County Chapter, Huntsville, AL; Norma Crowder, Senior As-sociate and Charade Jackson, Associate, of Individual Client Services, American Red Cross NationalHeadquarters, Washington, DC.DSCLS202A August 2006
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  8. 8. About This Course ..................................................................................Course PurposeThe purpose of this basic Disaster Services’ course is to prepare you to perform the tasks of anIndividual Client Services Client Casework Service Associate (CLS/CC/SA) on chapter, multi-chapterand national disaster operations. The focus of this course is on the common systems, processes andterminology that enable the Red Cross to provide efficient and effective service delivery to individualsand communities affected by disaster, using disaster workers who have not worked together previously.During this course, you will learn the essential skills and information needed to conduct clientcasework when providing assistance to individual clients. This includes the correct application of theprinciple methods and tools used by the Red Cross to conduct Client Casework, with one importantthe exception—the web-based Client Assistance System (CAS). The limitations of time and availablecomputers in sufficient quantities to accommodate all participants do not allow an opportunity to learnhow to use the Client Assistance System during this course. However, because the Client AssistanceSystem is now the standard method of documenting, issuing and reporting Red Cross assistance forclients, it is important that you enroll in a CAS class as soon as possible, if you have not already doneso. Your chapter training administrator can link you to the intructor-led or online courses that areavailable. All Red Cross Client Caseworkers must be CAS proficient!This course is also not intended to prepare you to function as a member of a chapter Disaster ActionTeam (DAT). It is recommended that you participate in the program at your chapter for orienting DATmembers to learn the specific protocols for documenting client casework and obtaining and issuingassistance when working as part of your chapter’s Disaster Action Team.Course ObjectivesAs a result of this training you will be able to— ■ Demonstrate the skills needed to perform an effective client interview. ■ Identify and demonstrate the correct use of the basic forms and tools needed to provide assistance to clients on chapter, multi-chapter and national disaster relief operations. ■ Make appropriate decisions regarding the use of Red Cross resources and agency referrals when providing assistance to clients.DSCLS202A August 2006
  9. 9. About This Course ..................................................................................Course OverviewThis course is divided into five segments: ■ Segment 1: Overview of Client Casework - Introduces you to the role of the caseworker and the Red Cross system within which you will work. ■ Segment 2: The Interview - Presents the essential skills used to conduct effective client casework interviews and describes the means by which you will assist them. ■ Segment 3: Assignment Settings - Provides an orientation to the work settings to which client caseworkers are assigned. ■ Segment 4: Skills Drill - Provides an opportunity to apply the information and skills learned to a real-world example of a client case. During this role play exercise you will interview and provide assistance to George and Edith Robinson who have been affected by a disaster, using the tools and resources you learned about during the course. ■ Segment 5: Let’s Get Started - Provides you with the information you will need to get started as a Client Caseworker in your local chapter.Each segment begins with a video introducing the segment content. The video shows caseworkersperforming interviews with clients. The interviewers also share their experiences with the audience.Please note that the video has not yet been updated to the terminology of the new Disaster ServicesHuman Resources System. The terminology you hear in the video may not always match that in yourworkbook. Your instructor will call your attention to these terms when this is the case.Course LengthThis course consists of seven hours of instruction to comprise an 8.5-hour training day. Your attendanceand participation for the entire time is required.Participant’s WorkbookYour Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook contains the essentialinformation and resources you need to perform an effective client interview and provide assistance toclients. This workbook is organized to follow the sequence of the course flow and provides space for youto take notes. Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  10. 10. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. Objectives After completing this segment you should be able to— • Identify the role of the Client Casework Activity within the Disaster Services Human Resources (DSHR) System. • Identify six values of client casework that enable the Red Cross to provide quality service. • Identify the ways in which the Client Casework Activity provides emergency assistance to disaster-affected individuals. Video Notes:DSCLS202A 1-August 2006
  11. 11. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment ..................................................................................The Disaster Services Human Resources (DSHR) SystemThe American Red Cross manages its disaster-related human resource needs through the DisasterServices Human Resources (DSHR) System. The DSHR System is organized into seven groups, orga-nized by the constituents each serves.Activities are defined by the specific services provided to the respective constituents. The DSHR SystemGroups and the respective DSHR System Activities are detailed in the chart on the opposite page. Eachactivity is responsible for performing the “tasks” which are necessary to provide services.DSHR PositionsThere are four positions within each DSHR System Group: Service Associate, Supervisor, Manager andAdministrator. Each position has designated roles.Service associates perform basic services within the DSHR Group and are often the first person tointeract with the individuals affected by a disaster. This Client Casework course provides the essentialknowledge and skills required of Client Casework Service Associates.Supervisors oversee a work unit composed of several service associates. Supervisors are familiar withthe activities and tasks performed by the unit staff and are able to answer questions on a day-to-daybasis. Managers oversee the work of the supervisors and are the subject matter experts within the groupor specific activity within a group. Administrators are responsible for leading the DSHR Group. Admin-istrators must have extensive supervisory and leadership experience.Individual Client Services (CLS) GroupThe Individual Client Services Group is responsible for the provision of financial, counseling and health-related services through the casework process to individuals affected by a disaster through the caseworkprocess. There are four activities within Individual Client Services: ■ Client Casework (CC) ■ Welfare Information (WI) ■ Health Services (HS) ■ Mental Health Services (MHS)The Individual Client Services chart on page 1-4 highlights the responsibilities of each of the CLSactivities.1- Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  12. 12. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. DSHR System Groups and ActivitiesDSCLS202A 1-August 2006
  13. 13. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. Individual Client Services (CLS) Group Client Casework (CC) ■ Helps identify and meet immediate disaster-caused needs by providing emergency assistance. ■ Provides recovery planning and assistance that addresses a client’s longer-term needs. Welfare Information (WI) ■ Works in partnership with Client Casework, Health Services and Disaster Mental Health to meet the family linking needs of vulnerable populations like children, the elderly and those with special medical or mental health needs. ■ Uses tools, such as the Safe and Well Web Site, to assist individuals in the disaster-affected area for contacting their loved ones. ■ Provides guidance and family linking resources to chapters so they may assist callers from outside the affected area to inquire about family members or loved ones. Health Services (HS) ■ Delivers Red Cross Health Services at the chapter or on a disaster relief operation. ■ Assists clients in meeting individual or family health needs, such as lost medications, eyeglasses, dentures and health equipment. ■ Provides basic health services in Red Cross shelters and other facilities. ■ Supports Staff Health Services in providing health care for staff assigned anywhere on a disaster relief operation. Disaster Mental Health (DMH) ■ Delivers mental health services at the chapter or on a disaster relief operation. ■ Works with and assists local community mental health providers to meet the emotional needs of the affected individual, families and communities. ■ Identifies and meets the disaster-related mental health needs of disaster workers. 1- Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  14. 14. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment ..................................................................................The Role of Client CaseworkClient Casework is the activity within the Individual Client Services DSHR Group that provides imme-diate emergency assistance to those individuals who may be impacted by man-made or natural disasters,ranging from single-family home incidents to major events such as tornados, floods, hurricanes andcatastrophic incidents. The assistance provided to clients can be issued in two forms—hard- as well assoft-assistance.Examples of soft assistance include listening, guidance, providing information, advocacy, counselingand referral. Hard assistance includes mass sheltering, feeding and the bulk distribution of personal careitems and cleaning materials, as well as limited emergency financial assistance to allow clients to pur-chase items needed immediately to begin their recovery.The Responsibilities of Client CaseworkWhen you accept the role of a Red Cross Client Caseworker, you are expected to perform your responsi-bilities both competently and sensitively. The six responsibilities of a client caseworker are: ■ Listening actively to the client’s story. ■ Providing financial assistance. ■ Making appropriate internal referrals to health or mental health services. ■ Making appropriate external referrals to the services of other agencies. ■ Directing the client towards Red Cross Mass Care assistance. ■ Providing Welfare Information and other accurate information that assists the client’s recovery.However, when representing the Red Cross performing your responsibilities competently is not enough.Anyone performing in the role of a Red Cross client caseworker must conduct themselves in a mannerthat upholds the commitments and values of the organization she or he represents. To each individualwith whom you come in contact, you are the Red Cross!DSCLS202A 1-August 2006
  15. 15. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment ..................................................................................The Commitment and Values of Client CaseworkThe Red Cross Fundamental Principles and its Core Values and Guiding Behaviors provide a foundationfor the Client Casework commitment and values.Note: To view the Red Cross Values and Guiding Behaviors, see Participant Resource G on page G-1. The commitment of the Red Cross to the affected communities we serve requires that all caseworkerssupport individuals and families in the recovery process by addressing their immediate disaster-causedemergency needs. To meet this commitment, client casework interviewers must make every effort toincorporate the following six values into the interview process: ■ Respect all clients. ■ Promote the client’s best interest. ■ Obtain and provide accurate information. ■ Provide standardized assistance. ■ Identify and use resources wisely. ■ Work as a team.Red Cross Code of ConductOur Fundamental Principles bring us together with a common purpose and the Red Cross values providethe foundation for standards of ethical behavior. Each of us is responsible for upholding the values andadhering to the Red Cross Code of Conduct. Anyone who works on behalf of the Red Cross is expectedto sign a Code of Conduct.Concern Connection LineBecause part of everyone’s job is to be an active protector of the values that make us who we are, ourresponsibility extends to promptly reporting any fraud, waste, abuse or other ethical concern that maycompromise our values or diminish the trust of the American people.The Concern Connection Line is a 24-hour, anonymous, confidential toll-free number that providesemployees, volunteers or members of the general public a mechanism for reporting concerns aboutillegal, unsafe or unethical conduct. It is staffed by independent third-party communication specialistswho are trained to gather information and forward it to the appropriate Red Cross management entity forreview and action.1- Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  16. 16. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment .................................................................................. Concern Connection Line Report: • Fraud • Waste • Abuse • Other Ethical Concerns Be Vigilant! It’s Your Job...Everyday.Addressing Disaster-caused Emergency NeedsThe client casework interviewer’s main job is to help bridge the gap between what each individual orfamily is able to accomplish alone and what is actually needed to help them to resume a more normallife. We obtain this information by interviewing the client.As a not-for-profit organization we must ensure that we use the donated dollar wisely. To fulfillthis responsibility it is important that we always verify the following information before providingassistance.Client Identification ■ Individuals and families requesting emergency assistance are required to provide identification that proves: 1) Who they are, and 2) They resided in the affected area at the time the disaster struck.DSCLS202A 1-August 2006
  17. 17. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment ..................................................................................Disaster-caused Needs Emergency assistance is given for items of legitimate disaster-caused or disaster-aggravated needs; not forany pre-existing conditions. Consult your supervisor when you have any questions about these or otherdisaster-caused or aggravated needs and pre-existing conditions.Once the needs are verified, the Red Cross then gives assistance for items that address a client’simmediate needs. Immediate emergency assistance is designed to make sure clients have— ■ Two sets of clothing (includes what they are wearing). ■ Something to eat. ■ A safe, dry place to sleep. ■ Something on which to sleep. ■ Basic critical medical needs met. ■ A short-term and a long-term recovery planProviding Standardized AssistanceStandardized assistance is the term used to describe the manner in which Red Cross provides eachindividual or family with items of assistance and/or services. Standardized assistance ensures that allassistance and services are similar in quantity, quality and type to those affected by that disaster, takinginto account the cultural and geographical differences of the affected area. Appropriate variations aremade only on the basis of need and family composition. By providing standardized assistance we helpensure that all clients have access to the resources necessary to begin their recovery.The primary mechanism for providing standardized assistance is the Standardized Emergency AssistancePrice List (ARC 4416) or a Red Cross unit’s locally developed and nationally-approved price list.These designated price lists provide specific guidance on the financial resources which can be provided.This list contains the items clients most commonly need following a disaster and the procedures tofollow when providing emergency financial assistance to the client.Your instructor will provide a copy of the current version of the Standardized Emergency AssistancePrice List to use during the class activities. You will have an opportunity to become more familiar withthese two documents as you begin to work in the field.1- Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  18. 18. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment ..................................................................................Welfare Information and Family ReunificationHelping family members communicate with loved ones after a disaster has been an important serviceprovided by the Red Cross for many years. As a Client Caseworker, your contact with clients withinthe affected area provides an opportunity to promote the Welfare Information and Family Reunificationservice. This service facilitates communication from inside the disaster-affected area to outside theaffected area. You can do so in three important ways:1. Ask ■ Have you contacted your loved ones? ■ Do they know where you are? ■ Do they know what your plan is?2. Offer ■ Can I help you contact your loved ones? ■ Would you like access to a phone? ■ Would you like access to register on the Red Cross Safe and Well Web Site? ■ Would you like the red Cross to contact your loved ones for you?3. Connect ■ Provide cell phone access or direct client to nearest phone access. ■ Direct client to nearest web access. ■ Provide client with the Reverse Notification Form (ARC 2079-1); collect and route the form.The Red Cross Safe and Well Web Site provides a way for those who are affected by a disaster tonotify loved ones of their whereabouts and status. Clients can register themselves in the database byentering their personal information into a simple-to-use screen: ■ About Me: First and last name, e-mail address, etc. ■ Home: Complete pre-disaster address. ■ Best Contact Information: Temporary residence and contact information ■ Safe and Well Messages: Select from among a list of standard messages to let family members know of the status of their well-being and how they can be reached.DSCLS202A 1-August 2006
  19. 19. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment ..................................................................................Concerned family and friends can search for those who have registered themselves using either a pre-di-saster phone number (home, work or cell) or a pre-disaster address. Anyone can access the Safe and WellWeb Site using the following address: https://disastersafe.redcross.org/Note: For more information about Welfare Information and Family Reunification and the Red Cross Safe andWell Web site, see Participant Resource E beginning on page E-1 in your workbook.Collaboration with Other DSHR Groups and ActivitiesClose coordination between different activities and groups allows the Red Cross to provide seamlessservice delivery. As a client caseworker, you will work closely with workers from Mass Care (MC) andInformation Management Support Services (IMS), in particular.Mass Care (MC)The Mass Care Group is responsible for providing services to the affected community as a whole. Theseservices include the coordination of sheltering, feeding and bulk distribution of supplies within commu-nities affected by a disaster. Unlike Client Casework, the services Mass Care provides do not require ancase record be established in order to receive help.There are four activities within this group: ■ Bulk Distribution (BD) ■ Feeding (FF) ■ Sheltering (SH) ■ Community Programs (CP)It is important for you, as client caseworker, to know what Mass Care services are available within theaffected community and where they can be accessed. Knowing this information allows you to share itwith clients.Information Management Support Services (IMS)Information Management Support Services (IMS) gathers, analyzes and disseminates information aboutthe scope and effectiveness of relief efforts conducted by the Red Cross. The information IMS collectsprovides a snapshot of the disaster relief operation status at any point in time.1 - 10 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  20. 20. 1 Overview of Client CaseworkSegment ..................................................................................There are three activities within IMS: ■ Disaster Assessment (DA): ■ Financial and Statistical Information Management (FSI) ■ Analysis, Planning (AP) ■ Information Dissemination (ID).You will work closely with the Financial and Statistical Information Management (FSI) Activity. FSI isresponsible for tracking the use of Client Assistance Cards and Disbursing Orders as well as ensuringthey are kept in a secure place. FSI is also responsible for maintaining the confidential Client CaseRecords (Form 901). We will learn more about Client Assistance Cards, Disbursing Orders and ClientCase Records in Segment 2.DSCLS202A 1 - 11August 2006
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  22. 22. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. Objectives After completing this segment you will be able to— • Explain how to conduct an effective client interview. • Explain how to document client information using the Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form 901) during the interview process. • Identify and complete the additional forms used in conjunction with the Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form 901). • Describe the processes used to issue a Client Assistance Card and a Disbursing Order to the client. Video Notes:DSCLS202A 2-August 2006
  23. 23. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................Conducting Client InterviewsClient Casework interviewers are the front-line workers who deal directly with the public. Theyinterview clients, determine the client’s needs and take steps to provide assistance. As an interviewer,your role in the interview process includes— ■ Climate setting. ■ Listening and consoling. ■ Providing emergency financial assistance. ■ Providing information and referrals.Climate SettingBecause an interview is often the first encounter a client has with the Red Cross, it is important that itis conducted in a professional and effective manner. To instill a sense of confidence in the client youshould always remember to— ■ Welcome the client warmly. ■ Treat the client with courtesy. ■ Speak softly and with a smile. ■ Tell the client your conversation with them will be confidential. ■ Tell the client the Red Cross is there to assist them with their recovery.Listening and ConsolingListening with empathy, to understand the client’s losses and needs, is the first step to building a trustingrelationship. Effective listening and consoling the client is one of the most important services weprovide.Active ListeningActive listening is one of the most important skills we use in client casework. When practicing activelistening you are focused on the person who is speaking in order to understand what he or she is saying.You should then be able to express, in your own words, what the person said to his or her satisfaction.2- Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  24. 24. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................Listening ChallengesMany people think active listening is easy. In fact, listening is one of the hardest skills to master. Someof the common listening challenges are: ■ Not paying attention ■ Pseudo-listening ■ Rehearsing ■ Interrupting ■ Hearing what is expectedEffective Listening SkillsThese challenges can be overcome by practicing good listening skills. Some of these skills include: ■ Minimizing distractions ■ Focusing on the other person ■ Paying attention to non-verbal language ■ Asking questions that clarify what the speaker is saying ■ Paraphrasing what the speaker has saidShowing EmpathyEmpathy is the ability to respond to the client in a way that shows you have listened to and understandhow the client feels. To listen with empathy you must see the world from the other person’s point ofview rather than your own.Examples of EmpathyDSCLS202A 2-August 2006
  25. 25. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................You will likely encounter a number of situations in which you may need to comfort the client.Acknowledging the client’s feelings and emotions by using the phrase “It sounds like you are veryconcerned about...” is a good way to show the client that you are in tune with his or her situation. Ifappropriate, place a hand on the client’s shoulder or pat his or her arm. Use appropriate eye contact.Note: Always be culturally sensitive when comforting clients. For example, some cultures have strictrules regarding physical contact between men and women. Talk to your supervisor if you have anyquestions regarding appropriate behavior.Give the client time to recover if they become emotional or began to cry. Do not tell the client that youknow how they feel nor insist on continuing the interview if the client becomes emotional.If small children are present, try to offer stuffed animals or have someone take care of the childrenduring the interview.Asking QuestionsAs an interviewer your role is to listen to the client’s story and provide assistance based on what heor she has said. Use both close-ended (directive) and open-ended questions or statements during theinterview.Close-ended (directive) questions are those that can be answered with “Yes”, “No” or a brief phrase. Usethis type of question when you need to gather basic information about the client. Examples of a closed-ended question include: ■ Please tell me your current address. ■ Do you have insurance coverage? ■ Where were you at the time of the disaster?Open-ended questions or statements encourage longer, more in-depth responses. Use open-endedquestions or statements when you want to determine the needs of the client. Examples of open-endedquestions or statements include: ■ Please tell me about the damage to your home.2- Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  26. 26. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. ■ Can you tell me what happened after the tornado destroyed your home? ■ What other financial resources do you have?Providing AssistanceAfter obtaining the correct information, you will need to determine the amount and type of assistance theclient may need. Use the Disaster Program Guidance and Standardized Emergency Assistance Price Listto determine the amount of emergency financial assistance the client may receive. Do not overlook thebenefits of providing information, referrals and resources to disaster clients. They are often as effectiveas any financial assistance you can provide.Providing Emergency Financial AssistanceThe Red Cross offers two methods of delivering emergency financial assistance to people who havebeen affected by a disaster; Client Assistance Cards (CACs) and Disbursing Orders (Form 104C). ADisbursing Order is commonly referred to as a “DO” in the field.A Client Assistance Card is a stored-value card similar to a debit or gift card. The client can use the cardto shop with any merchant that accepts MasterCard®. A Disbursing Order functions like a voucher. Itcan be used to purchase merchandise and services from vendors such as, contractors, landlords, doctorsand hotels. Both Client Assistance Cards and Disbursing Orders— ■ Add a measure of dignity to the recovery process by enabling individuals to purchase specific items from the merchant of their choice, and select the color, size, style, etc., of the items. ■ Provide a boost to the local economy by putting money back into the disaster- affected community. ■ Enable Red Cross to be accountable for its financial commitments, which leads us to be good stewards of the donated dollar.As a client casework interviewer you are responsible for issuing these types of financial assistance to theclient. You will learn more about procedures for issuing either type of assistance later in the course.DSCLS202A 2-August 2006
  27. 27. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................Providing Information, Referrals and Resources to Disaster ClientsIt is important to provide the client with complete and accurate information about Red Cross servicesand other community resources that may be available to him or her. One of the most valuable rolesthe Red Cross plays is to connect individuals with external organizations that can also provide help.When making a referral, it is important that you know something about the agency and the assistance itprovides. If possible, give the clients the following information: ■ How to access the resource (e.g. business hours, location of office and contact information). ■ What documentation the client may need (e.g., written referral, photo identification and insurance papers). ■ Eligibility requirements (e.g., age, income and residency).Below is a list of some community agencies that may assist people affected by a disaster. Talk to yourchapter or supervisor for a list of community agencies (local, state, and national) to which clients can bereferred. ■ Clothing: – Seventh-Day Adventist Church ■ Clothing, linens, housewares, furniture: – St. Vincent de Paul – Salvation Army ■ Rent, prescription drugs, food stamps: – Department of Social Services ■ Housing locations: – Housing authority ■ Eyeglasses: – Lions Club – Optometrists association ■ Occupational supplies: – Trade unionsAdditional resources may be available for individuals under the age of 5 years and over the age of 62years. These programs include Meals on Wheels and Women, Infants and Children (WIC). Talk to yoursupervisor or chapter for more information.2- Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  28. 28. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................Documenting the Interview and Assistance ProvidedYou must establish a case record for every client you interview. This record contains all the informationyou receive about the client during the interview, such as personal data, emergency needs and contactinformation, as well as details of the assistance that is provided. The records are stored in a centralizedlocation where follow-up interviews and assistance can be documented. There are two types of caserecords: 1. Computer-based - The Client Assistance System (CAS) 2. Paper-based - The Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form 901)Whether you use the Client Assistance System or the Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form901), it is critical to document information about the client’s case accurately.Client Assistance System (CAS)The Client Assistance System (CAS) is a web-based application used to document a client’s informationand the assistance each receives using a method which allows the information to be entered andstored electronically in a single, centrally-located system of record. Using a computer, caseworkersand supervisors can enter and retrieve information about a client’s case using an assigned log in andpassword.Centrally-located client data provides the ability to generate reports that reveal important informationabout the status of a relief operation and the clients and cases related to that operation. It also enables theRed Cross to ensure accountability to our donors and the public.Because of these features, the Client Assistance System is now the standard method ofdocumenting, issuing and reporting Red Cross assistance for clients.The Client Assistance System is relatively easy to learn when you are familiar with the paper-basedDisaster Registration Case Record (Form 901) you will learn today. It requires only the most basiccomputer knowledge and skills. Participant Resource F on page F-1 of this workbook demonstrates therelationship between the Form 901 and the data entry points in the Client Assistance System. SpecificRed Cross training courses are offered to caseworkers and supervisors for learning how to use the CAS.DSCLS202A 2-August 2006
  29. 29. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................Staff assigned to the Client Casework Activity are required to take available training, preferably attheir chapter or online prior to deployment. A training database can be accessed online for learning andpractice as noted below. Self registration link: Replace the ##### with your chapter code (no spaces). https://learningctr.redcross.org/elms/pws/portal.do?siteID=#####%5fResponseYour chapter can assist you with obtaining access to this online site and with registration as well as withother resources.Completing a Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form 901)The Disaster Registration and Case Record (Form 901) is the paper-based case record. The Form 901has four parts, each of which are lettered A through D. Parts A through C (also known as “flimsies”)are the quarter-page portions at the top of the form. Each part (or flimsy) is a different color; blue (PartA), pink (Part B) and yellow (Part C). Part D—also known as the “hard copy” or “case file”—is the lastpage of the form and measures 11” x 17 3/4”.All client information is recorded on the front of the form. Use a ball-point pen when enteringinformation onto this form. Print one capital letter in each block on the flimsy. Be sure to press hard sothat the information is recorded on all the copies.Note: You can fold Part D just below the supervisors name block (with the printing on the outside) tocreate a folder where copies of other forms related to the case can be placed.Completing Parts A-CUse the following steps when completing Parts A-C and the top portion of Part D of Form 901. Referto Participant Resource A on page A-1 at the back of this workbook to view an example of a completedForm 901 flimsy.1. Check Client IdentificationThe most useful and common form of identification is a non-expired state driver’s license with a currentaddress. Record the following information from the license number in the block labeled “FamilyIdentified By:” ■ State of issue ■ Last four digits of the license number2- Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  30. 30. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. ■ Month and year of expiration.Verify whether the name and address on the license matches the name and address provided earlierby the client. If the name and address recorded on the Form 901 matches, note that the information isverified as follows: “VA 6789 / exp. 09/09 (name/address verified)”If the name on the license matches the Form 901 but the address is different record that the informationis different: “VA 6789 / exp. 09/09 (name verified/address different)”If the address does not match, the client must provide an alternate form of identification showing theclient resides at the address in the disaster-affected area. Record the form of additional identificationused to verify the address as described below.If a driver’s license is not available, the client may use a current utility bill or the testimony of aprofessional individual, such as a policeman, social worker, clergy or landlord to establish identity.Include the utility company’s name and the last four digits of the account number (“VEPCO utilitybill; 0002”) or the name and position of the individual who establishes their identification. Notify yoursupervisor if the client’s identity cannot be verified.Note: A Social Security Number is not normally required to complete this form. Check with yoursupervisor to find out when the use of a Social Security Number is appropriate.2. Record Client’s Name and AddressRecord the client’s name and pre-disaster address (including zip code) in the appropriate spaces. Be sureto include the name of the client’s spouse.Note: Always be culturally sensitive to the way in which people identify themselves. For example, inSpanish-speaking cultures individuals use the last name of both parents.3. Record Household DemographicsDemographic information is recorded in two separate areas on the form. On the left-hand side of theform are four spaces. The information required in this area includes:DSCLS202A 2-August 2006
  31. 31. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. ■ Number of people living in the household ■ Number of people age 62 years or older ■ Number of people under the age of 5 years ■ Number of household members unemployed as a result of the disasterThis information is important because it allows you to determine if there are any household memberswho are eligible for additional assistance.On the far right-hand side of the form you record the name, ages and sex of all the members in thehousehold.Print the first name of each person living in the home at the time of the disaster. Include the last name ifit is different from the head of the household. You must also indicate the current status of each householdmember in the block labeled “K/I/H/M/NA” (Killed, Injured, Hospitalized, Missing, Not Affected).Note: A household is defined as a group of individuals (adults and/or children) who live in the samehousing unit and prepare meals together. You must complete a separate Form 901 (case record) for eachhousehold.When two or more cases are related, such as two separate households residing within the same housingunit, they should be cross-referenced. When cross-referencing case records, each case record willcontain the case number of the other household so that the caseworker can refer to both cases whenproviding assistance. Talk to your supervisor when this situation occurs.4. Record Red Cross Disaster Relief InformationThis information includes the Disaster Relief Operation (DRO) number, type of event, the day the eventhappened, chapter code and service center codes. You can get this information from your supervisor.5. Record Property Damage InformationIn this area you record information about the property, the type of damage it sustained, insurancecoverage and personal income range.Income information is not used to provide Red Cross emergency assistance; rather, it is used to more2 - 10 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  32. 32. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................accurately plan the client’s recovery.Note: Asking about a person’s income is sometimes a sensitive question to answer. A good way toapproach this situation is to allow the client to check the appropriate box.6. Record Contact InformationInformation recorded in these blocks include: ■ Pre-disaster telephone number ■ Alternative telephone number ■ Contact at the alternative telephone number ■ Post-disaster address of clientAlways try to get at least two current and active phone numbers at which a client can be reached. Enterthe name and telephone number and relationship of the person who will most likely be answering thephone. Recording when the client can be reached at these numbers is helpful to anyone having to followup with the client at a later time.Note: Make sure that all contact information recorded is correct. It may be the only reliable way inwhich to contact the client.7. Name of InterviewerPrint your name and the date in the appropriate box legibly.Note: Refer to Participant Resource A on page A-2 at the back of this workbook to view an example of acompleted Form 901, Parts A-C.Completing Part DUse the procedures described below when completing the remaining portion of Part D of Form 901.1. Brief Statement of How the Family Was Affected in a DisasterThis section provides the road map to the client’s story. Only document the information that is needed toassist the disaster client with his or her recovery.DSCLS202A 2 - 11August 2006
  33. 33. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................Red Cross client case files are important documents. You are required to keep the client’s informationconfidential. Client information may not be shared unless a client signs a Release of ConfidentialInformation giving the Red Cross express written permission to do so. Both the Red Cross and otheragencies rely upon the information in the case files to make decisions about what, if any assistance, toprovide to the client. The case file should only contain information related to the needs of the individualor family, the nature of the request for assistance, and the assistance provided to meet the client’semergency disaster-related needs and to help the client begin the recovery process.If you have suspicions about the legitimacy of the client’s eligibility for assistance: ■ Tell your supervisor. ■ Do not make any notations in the narrative about your suspicions. ■ Do not investigate your suspicions–that is not your role as a caseworker . ■ If your supervisor tells you to make a notation in the narrative, write “Case being reviewed by Supervisor.”There are some specific “do’s” and “don’ts” that all Red Cross workers documenting information in thenarrative section of a case file are expected to follow: Do: Do NOT include: Write a narrative Include personal opinions or rumors. Be brief Make comments on the client’s character Be accurate; stick to the facts Make comments on possible legal issues Focus on information relevant to the case The narrative should start with the phrase “Client states...”. When completing this section ask the clientthe following questions: ■ What date did the damage occur? ■ What was the cause of the damage? ■ Where were you or other household members during the time the damage occurred? ■ What is the degree of damage to your residence? ■ What type of needs have been caused by this disaster? ■ What are your immediate needs?Record the client’s responses to these questions.2 - 12 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  34. 34. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................When assistance is provided, write in the type of assistance, the method in which it is given and theitems that are provided. Examples of the type of information to include are: ■ Client Assistance Card for food/groceries ■ Disbursing Order for rent ■ Referral to Salvation Army for additional clothingNote: Participant Resource B beginning on page B-1 in your workbook contains several samplenarratives.2. Medical InformationThe purpose of this section is to determine whether the client has any medical needs. Do notdocument any physical or mental medical conditions when completing this section. The HealthInsurance Portability and Accountability Act-Privacy Regulations (HIPAA) does not allow the releaseof confidential medical information. This includes statements regarding specific mental or healthconditions. Therefore, you should only record medical needs, such as “lost glasses,” “lost prescription,”“destroyed walker,” etc.; “needs replacement” and “1475 issued”.If a client or household member requires immediate medical attention or first aid, take him or her to anEmergency Medical Technician on the scene or a Health Services (HS) worker and finish the interviewat a later time. If the client or household member is being treated by HS, record on the Form 901 that aform “1475” was issued. Give the Form 901 to the HS worker.3. Client Casework Supervisor’s NameWrite in the name of your supervisor in the space provided. Do not fill out this section until the Form901 is complete and both you and the client have signed the form.4. Family Recovery Plans–Immediate and Long-RangeThe purpose of this section is to record the client’s immediate and long-range plans for recovery. Makesure you include the following information when completing this section: ■ Does the client intend to return to his or her previous living quarters? ■ Does the client need temporary housing until repairs are made or until another home is found?DSCLS202A 2 - 13August 2006
  35. 35. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. ■ Does the client have insurance coverage? If so, – What type of damages are covered? – What is the maximum amount of coverage for each category? – What is the name and contact information of the insurance company or local agent? – What is the status of the claim? ■ Does the client have any other financial resources in addition to the Red Cross (personal or government)?Note: If the status of an insurance claim is not known, complete and have the client sign a Release ofConfidential Information for the insurance company.5. Directions to the ResidenceThe purpose of this section is to record specific directions from the chapter or service center to thepre-disaster address. In urban areas you can use standardized map coordinates or major streetintersections to locate the residence. In rural areas, include distances and prominent landmarks.6. ReferralsReferrals to other relief agencies are a valuable service that the Red Cross can provide to clients. Thisis especially true when the client’s needs go beyond the scope of the standardized assistance and otherservices Red Cross provides.The agencies listed in this section of the Form 901 are only used on larger disasters when the Presidentof the United States issues a formal disaster declaration. Your supervisor will let you know when youcan make these referrals.7. SignaturesAsk the head of the household or another responsible adult member of the family to sign in thebox labeled “Signature of Family Representative.” Have him or her date the form as well. Placeyour signature in the box labeled “Signature of Interviewer” to the immediate right of the familyrepresentative’s signature. Date the form as well.2 - 14 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  36. 36. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................Note: If no one in the family can write, have one member mark an “X” and have it witnessed byanother adult besides the interviewer.8. Release of Confidential InformationBecause Red Cross shares client information with other agencies when they have the client’s consent todo so, it is especially important that all information in the file, including the narrative, be accurate andcontain only information that is relevant to the client’s case.Written permission from the client in this section of the Form 901 allows the Red Cross to obtain orexchange information with the agencies listed in the referral section. The decision to sign or not to signa release rests entirely with the client. On a declared disaster, check with your supervisor to determine ifyou need to obtain additional releases from the client, other than this one in the Client Case Record.Follow these steps when completing this section: 1. Read and explain the purpose of the release to any individual or family that is applying for Red Cross assistance, including those who do not receive financial assistance. 2. Ask the family representative if he or she would like to sign the release. a) If the client chooses to sign the release, instruct him or her to place his or her signature and the date in the appropriate area. b) If the client chooses not to sign the release– – Explain to the client that the Red Cross cannot exchange information with any of the agencies listed in the referral section if he or she applies for assistance. – Ask the client why he or she chooses not to sign and record the record that reason. – Write “CLIENT DECLINED TO SIGN” on the designated client signature line and sign your name on the designated interviewer signature line to the right. Place the date next to both entries. Print your name legibly below your signature.The American Red Cross is a member of the disaster relief network which shares the client’s casefiles with other member agencies utilizing the Client Assistance Network (CAN) when the clientprovides written consent to do so. When CAN is being used to share information during a disaster reliefoperation, your supervisor will provide specific guidance about how to obtain release of confidentialinformation from the client in order to do so.DSCLS202A 2 - 15August 2006
  37. 37. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................9. Information From Home Visits and Other ContactsThis section is used to record follow-up actions and communications regarding the case. Note anycorrespondence or documents exchanged between the Red Cross, the client and the organizations towhich referrals have been made. When recording information in this section— ■ Review previous entries to ensure that all disaster-caused needs are identified and addressed. Talk to your supervisor if you have any questions or concerns. ■ Document what type of assistance was provided. ■ Record the date and time of the entry. ■ Sign your full name at the end of the entry. Ensure it is written legibly.Notes:2 - 16 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  38. 38. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................Forms Used with the Form 901 Form Purpose CAC Authorization Is written to provide financial assistance to clients for the purchase Form 1030 of good and services. The blue copy goes to the client, the pink copy goes into the client’s case file and the yellow copy goes to Financial Statistical Information Management (FSI). Client Assistance A communication tool used by Health Services (HS), Client Memorandum Casework (CC) and Disaster Mental Health (DMH) to exchange and Form 1475 record information about the client. Disbursing Order (DO) Is written to provide financial assistance to clients for the purchase Form 140C of goods and services. The blue and green copy go to the client. The pink copy goes into the client’s case file and the yellow copy goes to Financial Statistical Information Management (FSI). Disaster Referral A communication tool used to inform disaster-affected individuals Form 5855 and families of other public and private agencies and organizations that provide disaster assistance. The original copy goes to the client and the second copy goes into the client’s case file. Landlord Verification (LLV) Is completed for all individuals and families who may request Red Form 6615 Cross assistance for rent or security deposits. The original copy goes to the client and the second copy goes into the client’s case file. Release of Confidential Written permission from client to release and/or acquire confidential Information information to/from an agency not listed on Form 901. The original is sent to the agency and the copy is put into the client’s case file (Form 901).DSCLS202A 2 - 17August 2006
  39. 39. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................Client Assistance CardsAs mentioned earlier, one method the Red Cross uses to provide financial assistance is the ClientAssistance Card (CAC).CAC FeaturesThe Client Assistance Card can be used to make purchases and to withdraw money from an ATM orreceive cash back when making a purchase by using a four-digit personal identification number (PIN).The pin number is provided along with the card.Just like a credit or debit card, there is a raised 16-digit number that is unique for each card. Cardsalso display an expiration date, the date after which a merchant will not accept the card. Cards expire120 days after activation. Unlike a credit or debit card, the client’s name is not on the front. There is,however, a signature space on the back.The back of the card has a signature space where the shopper signs. (The shopper is the client orsomeone the client designates to make purchases for him or her.) The card also has a warning on theback of the card stating that the funds cannot be used to purchase alcohol, tobacco, or weapons.Benefits of Using a Client Assistance CardUsing a Client Assistance Card benefits our clients, Red Cross caseworkers, merchants, and donors.Because a Client Assistance Card can be used like a debit card, a disaster-affected client can makepurchases less conspicuously and therefore, with more dignity. For the American Red Cross caseworker,using the card reduces the preparation of multiple disbursing orders, making the process of providingassistance quicker and more efficient. For merchants, accepting the Client Assistance Card facilitatesfaster receipt of payment by electronic funds transfer (EFT). Finally, a Client Assistance Card allows theRed Cross to track the use of donated dollars in a quick and efficient manner.2 - 18 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  40. 40. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................Issuing Client Assistance CardsIssuing Client Assistance Cards is a six-step process.1. Receive Client Assistance CardsWhen reporting for your shift, you will provide photo identification to the Financial and StatisticalInformation Management (FSI) worker. Preferred forms of identification are your driver’s license or RedCross ID.You will then receive the Client Assistance Cards from FSI in sealed, numbered envelopes. Theenvelopes protect the card number and provide security for the PIN.The FSI worker should also issue you the following forms: ■ Client Assistance Charge-Out Record (Form 1032) - Used to keep track of the CACs assigned to you. ■ Client Assistance Authorization (Form 1030) - Used to record the card number and a description of the type and amount of assistance provided to the client. ■ Client Assistance Card protective sleeves - Used to protect the card from becoming demagnetized, which can happen if the card is placed near a cell phone. ■ Register of Purchases forms - An envelope with spaces on the front for tracking card use. You will give it to the client who then uses it to keep a running balance of expenditures on the front and put purchase receipts inside.In addition, you should also receive the following items from the FSI worker or your supervisor: ■ Merchant Letter - Describes the card and lists the regulations that apply to all merchants accepting the card. You show this letter to the client when the merchant has a question regarding the use of the CAC. ■ Client Instructions - Provides a reference for the client when he or she starts using the card. The instructions include phone numbers and a web site the client can use for questions and more information.Before you accept responsibility for the cards you must— ■ Match the serial numbers on the card envelope with the serial numbers written on the Charge-Out Record (Form 1032).DSCLS202A 2 - 19August 2006
  41. 41. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. ■ Verify there are sufficient quantities of cards and supporting documentation and materials for your shift. ■ Verify with your supervisor how the Client Assistance Card is being activated. When the card is not being activated through the Client Assistance System, verify the activation phone number .This is the number you will call to activate the card after you issue the card to the client.Sign and date the Charge-Out Record and make sure the FSI worker does so as well.Note: When you sign the Charge-Out Record, you are accountable for the cards in your possession. Letthe Financial and Statistical Information Management worker know if there is a discrepancy betweenthe numbers on the envelopes and the numbers on the Charge-Out Record before you sign. You may beinformed that card activation will be completed by someone other than the caseworker.2. Interview ClientAs you recall, one of the primary purposes of the client interview is to determine immediate, emergency,disaster-caused financial needs. When Red Cross financial assistance will be provided, it could be aClient Assistance Card, a Disbursing Order or a combination of the two.3. Complete the Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030)The next step is to complete the Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030). This form is used todescribe the amount and type of assistance for which the CAC can be used.When completing the Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030)— ■ Determine whether the client and the shopper (the person making the purchases) are the same person. If someone other than the client is doing the shopping, provide that person’s name and contact phone number. The pre-disaster address should be the client’s. ■ Complete the appropriate fields. ■ Ask the shopper to choose a confidential, easy-to-remember 4-digit access code. This code created by the client/shopper is for identification purposes only. ■ Review the Client Instruction Letter in detail with the client.See Participant Resource C on page C-1 for a sample of a completed Client Assistance CardAuthorization (Form 1030).2 - 20 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  42. 42. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................4. Complete Card ActivationIn most cases, you will activate the card before you issue it to the client. In CAS this is done in the CACtab section. (See Participant Resource F beginning on page F-1.)When you are not using the CAS, follow these steps to activate the card— ■ Move a discreet distance away from the client to make the phone call. ■ Call the designated phone number. ■ Provide the activator with the following information from the Form 1030: – Client name and pre-disaster address – Card number – Case number – Chapter incidence or DR number – Contact number for shopper – Total amount of assistance – Access code – Name of person who authorized assistance – Name of activator – Chapter and county codes – DateTo insure the card was properly activated, ask the activator to read all the information back to you,including the spelling of the client or shopper’s name. It’s important to activate the card at the time youissue it rather than waiting until the end of your shift. Clients need to be able to use the card as soon aspossible.5. Issue Card and Obtain Client SignatureReview the following information with the client before giving him or her the activated CAC: ■ When using the card to make purchases, the client may select either credit or debit as the transaction type. If a client wants to receive cash back, he or she must select debit as the transaction type and enter the designated four-digit PIN. ■ Advise the client or shopper to check the card balance before making a purchase, inform the merchant of the tax-exempt status of the purchases and avoid returns and credits. A card without funds to fully cover a purchase will be declined. ■ Explain to the client that purchases are monitored. Cards can be suspended at anyDSCLS202A 2 - 21August 2006
  43. 43. 2 The InterviewSegment .................................................................................. time if misuse is suspected, so it is very important to use the card for only approved items. Approved items are the ones listed on the Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030).Note: If the client withdraws cash or gets a cash return on a purchase, they will lose the tax freeadvantage of using a CAC; pay a fee for the cash withdrawal; and the Red Cross will not be able toreplace any cash that is lost or stolen.Give the client a copy of the Merchant Letter and explain its purpose. Since clients only have one copyof the letter, they should not give it to the merchant. The merchant may see it, read it, and photocopy it,but they cannot keep it.Explain how the client can use the Register of Purchases envelope to document card transactions andkeep up with the funds remaining on the card. (It’s similar to the check register for a checking account.)Note: Emphasize to the client that using the Register of Purchases envelope can help them avoid theembarrassment of attempting to make purchases that exceed the remaining value on the card.Ask the client to sign the back of the card in front of you. If someone other than the client is shopping,the shopper’s signature must be on the back of the card. This is a MasterCard® requirement and is notnegotiable.Point out the Customer Service number on the back of the card and remind clients that this is the numberto call for card balances or to report a lost or stolen card. If they plan on using the cash-back option onthe card, they can change their PIN through Customer Service.Ask the client to sign and date the Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030) in front of you.Give the original (blue) copy of the Client Assistance Card Authorization (Form 1030) to the clientor shopper. The pink copy goes in the case file, and you will return the yellow copy to Financial andStatistical Information Management.2 - 22 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  44. 44. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................6. Account For and Return Unused Cards and DocumentationAt the end of your shift, you must account for all the cards on the Charge-Out Record. Return anyunused cards and submit the completed Client Assistance Card Authorization forms. Inform the FSIworker whether or not you will be returning for another shift. If so, any unused CACs will be reassignedto you at the beginning of your next shift. If you are out-processing from the disaster relief operation,you will sign the Client Assistance Card Charge-Out Record.Disbursing Orders (Form 140C)As mentioned earlier, a Disbursing Order (DO) works like a voucher. It can be used to purchase goodsand services from vendors. In addition, a Disbursing Order is the only method you can use whenproviding the client with assistance for housing.FeaturesA Disbursing Order has four copies; Original Copy (blue), a Merchant’s Copy (green), anAccountant’s Copy (yellow) and a Case File Copy (pink). Types of Disbursing OrdersDisbursing Orders are categorized by the type of transaction for which the DO is written. Two commoncategories are non-cash grants and cash grants.A non-cash grant is a DO that has been written directly to the vendor. The client gives the DO to themerchant in exchange for goods and services.A cash grant refers to a DO that is written by the interviewer but processed by Shared Servicesand issued to the client in the form of a check. The check is mailed directly to the client to cover orreimburse disaster-related expenditures. This type of DO is used rarely and requires authorization from aClient Casework Supervisor.Specific procedures for managing the different color copies of Disbursing Orders are determined by thescope of the disaster (chapter vs. national response) and the type of financial assistance provided(non-cash grant or cash grant).DSCLS202A 2 - 23August 2006
  45. 45. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................In most cases, the Original and Merchant’s copies (blue and green) are given to the client, the Case Filecopy (pink) is placed in the client’s case file and the Account’s copy (yellow) is sent to Financial Statistical Information Management (FSI) for processing.Talk to your chapter or supervisor to find out the specific procedures being used at your disaster reliefoperation (DRO).Issuing Disbursing OrdersThere are five steps you must take in order to issue a Disbursing Order to a client.1. Receive Disbursing Orders.As with the Client Assistance Card, you will provide photo identification to the Financial and StatisticalInformation Management (FSI) worker. Preferred forms of identification are your driver’s license or RedCross ID. You will then receive the Disbursing Orders from FSI. At this time you should also receive aDisbursing Order Charge-Out Record (Form 5740). This record is used to track the Disbursing Ordersassigned to you.Before you accept responsibility for the DOs you must match the serial numbers on the DOs with theserial numbers written on the Charge-Out Record (Form 5740). Let the FSI worker know if there is adiscrepancy between the numbers on the DOs and the numbers on the Charge-Out Record. Once you arecertain the serial numbers match, sign and date the Charge-Out Record and make sure the FSI workerdoes so as well.Note: You are accountable for all Disbursing Orders assigned to you. Do not share or exchangeDisbursing Orders with another caseworker!2. Interview the Client.Interview the client to determine immediate, emergency, disaster-caused financial needs. As you recall,one of the primary purposes of the client interview is to determine immediate, emergency, disaster-caused financial needs. When Red Cross financial assistance will be provided, it could be a ClientAssistance Card, a Disbursing Order or a combination of the two.2 - 24 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  46. 46. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................3. Complete the Disbursing Order (Form 140C). The next step is to complete the Disbursing Order(Form 140C). This form is used to describe the amount and items of assistance for which the DO can beused. See Participant Resource D on page D-1 of this workbook for a sample of a completed DisbursingOrder (Form 140C). Print the information legibly; no strike throughs or erasures are permitted.4. Give the Disbursing Order to the Client (Blue original and Green copies only).Review the following information with the client before giving him or her a Disbursing Order: ■ Disbursing Orders are nontransferable. Payment will only be made to the merchant to whom it is issued. ■ Clients should inform the merchant that the Red Cross is generally exempt from state and local taxes. ■ Clients may only purchase the items listed on the Disbursing Order; Payments will not be made for substitute items. ■ Clients are responsible for paying dollar amounts in excess of the DO.Note: More detailed directions on the use of a Disbursing Order are located on the back of the form(blue copy).Inform the client that the vendor instructions for how to process the DO are on the back of the blue form.5. Account For and Return Unused Disbursing Orders and Documentation.At the end of your shift, you must account for all the DOs on the Charge-Out Record. Return any unusedDisbursing Orders and submit the completed Disbursing Order Authorization forms. Inform the FSIworker whether or not you will be returning for another shift. If so, any unused Disbursing Orders willbe reassigned to you at the beginning of your next shift. If you are out-processing from the disaster reliefoperation, you will sign the Disbursing Order Charge-Out Record.Voiding and Canceling Disbursing OrdersUnder certain circumstances a Disbursing Order may be voided or cancelled. A Disbursing Order is“voided” when the Red Cross has all four copies. Cancelled Disbursing Orders are those invalidatedafter the yellow copy has been processed through Financial and Statistical Information Management.Voiding Disbursing Orders.DSCLS202A 2 - 25August 2006
  47. 47. 2 The InterviewSegment ..................................................................................Entries on a DO may not be erased, struck through, or written over. If a mistake is made, write “VOID”in large letters across the face of the orders making sure the letters go through all four copies.Record it as “VOID” on the Disbursing Order Charge-out Record (Form 5740), and return it to FSIwhen you return the documentation at the end of your shift or when you need more DOs. Never discardor destroy a voided DO.Canceling Disbursing Orders.Canceled Disbursing Orders are those invalidated after the yellow copy has been processed throughFinancial Statistical Information Management (FSI). To cancel a Disbursing Order you must— ■ Obtain the Original Copy (blue) and Merchant Copy (green) of the Disbursing Order from the client. ■ Pull the pink DO copy from the client’s case file. ■ Write one of the following two phrases, as applicable, across the face of all three copies: – “Canceled. Replaced by DO No.” when the canceled DO is replaced by a new one. – “Canceled. Not replaced” when the canceled order is not replaced. ■ Return the pink copy of the canceled DO to the client’s case file. ■ Send the Original Copy (blue) and Merchant Copy (green) to FSI.Note: If the canceled Disbursing Order has been replaced by another Disbursing Order, be sure toinclude the yellow copy of the replacement Disbursing Order when you send the green and blue copiesto FSI.2 - 26 Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  48. 48. 3 Assignment SettingsSegment .................................................................................. Objectives After completing this segment you will be able to— • Describe the various assignment settings in which Client Casework activities are conducted. Video Notes:DSCLS202A 3-August 2006
  49. 49. 3 Assignment SettingsSegment ..................................................................................There are three basic settings in which you are likely to conduct casework: office settings, field settingsand shelters.Office SettingsIn an office setting, you will most likely have access to electrical power, telephones, fax machines, formsand office supplies. You will also have direct access to your supervisor and members of other activitygroups that will make communications easier.Common tasks you may perform in an office setting are: ■ Conducting initial interviews with disaster-affected individuals that are referred to the Red Cross by other agencies, such as the local fire department. ■ Following up on cases initiated by Red Cross workers out in the field. ■ Making referrals. ■ Issuing Client Assistance Cards or Disbursing Orders to clients.Chapter SettingThe chapter setting is most common office setting when dealing with small events, such as a single-family house or apartment fire. In a chapter setting you may be asked to perform a variety of tasks suchas conducting an initial interview, issuing a Disbursing Order or Client Assistance Card or following upon cases that have been initiated in the field.Service Delivery SiteThe service delivery site setting is most common when dealing with larger events that affectcommunities, such as a flood or tornado. In a service delivery site setting, clients or disaster-affectedindividuals come to a central location to meet with Red Cross workers. Schools, community centers orshelters are used as service delivery sites.The tasks you perform in this type of setting are more specialized and the client may interact with morethan one worker. For example, a receptionist may greet the client and complete the first portion of theDisaster Case Registration and Record (Form 901) then send the client to you or another Red Crossworker who is responsible for completing the narrative portion of the form and who also providesassistance.3- Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook
  50. 50. 3 Assignment SettingsSegment ..................................................................................Call CenterWhen a disaster is too large or extensive to meet client needs adequately through normal means, a RedCross phone center will handle calls from individuals affected by a disaster. You may be assigned to aCall Center to conduct casework by phone.Field SettingsWhen you are assigned to work in a field setting, you travel within the disaster-affected area towork with clients. Field settings often present greater challenges because of limited direct access tooffice technology and other resources, such as your supervisor. It is important to be prepared whenyou are going into a field setting. Bring plenty of disaster forms and office supplies with you. Dressappropriately for the conditions and always wear your Red Cross identification.Disaster Action Team (DAT)The basic organizational unit in a field setting is the Disaster Action Team (DAT). As a member of theDAT team you are responsible for responding and meeting the immediate emergency needs of clients atthe local level. Like when working in a chapter setting, you may be asked to perform a variety of taskswhile responding to a disaster as part of a DAT, such as conducting client casework and meeting client’simmediate mass care needs.Outreach ActivitiesOutreach activities may be organized when there is no disaster assessment (DA) information anddisaster-affected individuals or clients cannot come to a centralized facility, such as a chapter or servicedelivery site. Outreach teams provide services and written information.Home VisitsHome visits are made to specific clients who already have a case open. American Red Cross caseworkershelp verify losses, evaluate living conditions and determine what assistance may be needed. You mayalso make a Home Visit to follow-up on a case or meet with people who cannot make it to the servicedelivery site for some reason, such as an injury.DSCLS202A 3-August 2006
  51. 51. 3 Assignment SettingsSegment ..................................................................................SheltersOpening and operating a shelter is one way the Red Cross takes care of the interim eating and sleepingneeds of people affected by a disaster while they make other living arrangements. Conducting clientcasework in a shelter is a convenience to clients, but more importantly, it hastens their recovery. Therecovery of shelter residents and the community is hindered the longer shelters remain open. Conductingclient casework in a shelter ensures timely and successful closing of shelters with the least stress toindividuals and families.Most often, client casework procedures are the same for interviewing shelter residents as they are forinterviewing clients in any service delivery site. One distinct difference is that casework is typicallyconducted during CLIENT convenient hours, often 4 – 9:30 PM. When it is necessary for sheltersto remain open for long periods of time, casework procedures may be modified to more efficientlyand effectively meet the remaining clients’ specific needs, enabling them to find alternative livingarrangements and facilitating the shelter closing.3- Client Casework: Providing Emergency Assistance Participant’s Workbook

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