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  • You know the content.But how do you communicate it? Successful communication is not just saying the right things, but making sure the right things are heard.Not just showing the right things, but making sure the right things are seen. And remembered.General reminders:Know your audienceBe conscious of timeGet to the pointSimple and clear slidesBe ready to jump around a lot
  • And that means you need to know your audience.Hint: He’s not this guy.
  • He’s this guy.
  • Or worse, this guy.
  • So we are here to help you help your audience see and hear and remember the right things – the things that will make them want to learn more about the opportunity your business presents…
  • So what IS the difference between content and communication? In the context of a business pitch, we think there are three essential elements of successful presenter-to-audience communication: A strategic position A limited number of key messages A distinctive point of viewBottom line: you are telling a story. So tell us where you are (position), who you are (POV), and what we need to know about you (message).
  • That’s a lot of advice, and much of it may be familiar to you. But we think it all comes down to three rules.
  • Source: energynow.com
  • 13 0827 session 2

    1. 1. Cleantech Open 2013 Webinar Series Tuesday, August 27, 2013
    2. 2. 2 Cleantech Open Confidential Information – All Rights Reserved Session 2: Tell Your Story, Sell Your Story (Communicating Value to Stakeholders) 2:45pm – 4:00pm, PDT Speaker: Hollie Rogin Partner Posit Partners Speaker: Maia Nilsson Partner Posit Partners
    3. 3. 2013 Cleantech Open | 3 Tell Your Story, Sell Your Story Presenting Your Business with Impact Maia Nilsson & Hollie Rogin Posit Partners 8/27/13
    4. 4. 2013 Cleantech Open | 4 Agenda • Introductions and objectives • Communication vs. content • What makes a strong story • Three rules to remember • Examples and tips • How PowerPoint differs from print • What makes a great slide presentation • Applying the three rules to your slides • Q & A 2013 Cleantech Open | 4
    5. 5. 2013 Cleantech Open | 5 Who We Are • Hollie Rogin and Maia Nilsson • Posit Partners: positioning strategy and messaging • Backgrounds in business-to-business technology marketing (IBM, SAP, Cisco, CDW, Covidien, Agilent Technologies) • Cleantech clients include Silver Spring Networks, PARC, Advanced Energy Industries, Firefly Power, Next Hydrogen and Colorado Cleantech 2013 Cleantech Open | 5
    6. 6. 2013 Cleantech Open | 6 Your Job Use your 10 minutes to get: • Interest from the judges • Opportunity to answer questions • Feedback to improve next time 2013 Cleantech Open | 6
    7. 7. 2013 Cleantech Open | 7 You Know the Content • Product/Market Fit • Technology/Product Validation • Business Model • Market(s) and Getting to them • Finances and Funding • Legal • Management Team • Sustainability 2013 Cleantech Open | 7
    8. 8. 2013 Cleantech Open | 8 Know Your Audience 2013 Cleantech Open | 8 CONTENT + CONNECTION (with your audience) = COMMUNICATION
    9. 9. 2013 Cleantech Open | 9 Know Your Audience 2013 Cleantech Open | 9
    10. 10. 2013 Cleantech Open | 10 Know Your Audience 2013 Cleantech Open | 10
    11. 11. 2013 Cleantech Open | 11 Why We’re Here This session is not about:  Public speaking or podium skills  Graphic design  PowerPoint wizardry 2013 Cleantech Open | 11
    12. 12. 2013 Cleantech Open | 12 Why We’re Here This session is not about:  Public speaking or podium skills  Graphic design  PowerPoint wizardry This session is about:  What you present  How you present it  Why it matters 2013 Cleantech Open | 12
    13. 13. 2013 Cleantech Open | 13 Communication vs. Content • Three hallmarks of an effective presentation: 1. Effectively establishes a competitive position – how you situate your business in the reader’s mind 2. Effectively communicate your key messages – the point(s) you want people to walk away with 3. Effectively convey a distinctive point of view – what you choose to emphasize, how and why • Bottom line: pitching your business is storytelling. • A positive response has as much to do with the way you present your business as it does with the business itself. 1 2 3 2013 Cleantech Open | 13
    14. 14. 2013 Cleantech Open | 14 The Elements of a Strong Business Story WHERE you stand in the marketplace relative to competitors “For upscale American families, Volvo is the family automobile that offers maximum safety.” POSITION (context, intention) 1 2013 Cleantech Open | 14
    15. 15. 2013 Cleantech Open | 15 The Elements of a Strong Business Story WHAT you say about your company and your offering(s) “Preventive Safety” … “Protective Safety” … “Child Safety” … “Security” POSITION (context, intention) MESSAGES (content, inflection) 2 2013 Cleantech Open | 15
    16. 16. 2013 Cleantech Open | 16 The Elements of a Strong Business Story POSITION (context, intention) 3 MESSAGES (content, inflection) HOW you say it — and from what perspective “There’s more to life than a Volvo. That’s why you drive one.” POV (point of view) 2013 Cleantech Open | 16
    17. 17. 2013 Cleantech Open | 17 From the Horse’s Mouth “Challenge yourself to deliver an 'easy-to-understand' story. Could I, your listener, replay to another person the very basics of your venture and how your target customers will benefit from using your product?” “Infuse passion throughout your delivery. Engage me with your story.” “Focus on the benefits to customers of acquiring/using your product. Does it simplify? Make money? Save money? Open new markets?” “Differentiate your business in some way from the competition - market channel, service, technical features, etc.” “Don't give me unclear, irrelevant, or unnecessary information. It is extremely important to your success that you winnow the full amount of information into the particular subset that is required for this presentation.” “Don't try to impress me with a lot of jargon.” —Angel Investors 2013 Cleantech Open | 17
    18. 18. 2013 Cleantech Open | 18 From the Horse’s Mouth “Challenge yourself to deliver an 'easy-to-understand' story. Could I, your listener, replay to another person the very basics of your venture and how your target customers will benefit from using your product?” “Infuse passion throughout your delivery. Engage me with your story.” “Focus on the benefits to customers of acquiring/using your product. Does it simplify? Make money? Save money? Open new markets?” “Differentiate your business in some way from the competition - market channel, service, technical features, etc.” “Don't give me unclear, irrelevant, or unnecessary information. It is extremely important to your success that you winnow the full amount of information into the particular subset that is required for this presentation.” “Don't try to impress me with a lot of jargon.” —Angel Investors 2013 Cleantech Open | 18
    19. 19. 2013 Cleantech Open | 19 From the Horse’s Mouth “Challenge yourself to deliver an 'easy-to-understand' story. Could I, your listener, replay to another person the very basics of your venture and how your target customers will benefit from using your product?” “Infuse passion throughout your delivery. Engage me with your story.” “Focus on the benefits to customers of acquiring/using your product. Does it simplify? Make money? Save money? Open new markets?” “Differentiate your business in some way from the competition - market channel, service, technical features, etc.” “Don't give me unclear, irrelevant, or unnecessary information. It is extremely important to your success that you winnow the full amount of information into the particular subset that is required for this presentation.” “Don't try to impress me with a lot of jargon.” —Angel Investors 2013 Cleantech Open | 19
    20. 20. 2013 Cleantech Open | 20 From the Horse’s Mouth “Challenge yourself to deliver an 'easy-to-understand' story. Could I, your listener, replay to another person the very basics of your venture and how your target customers will benefit from using your product?” “Infuse passion throughout your delivery. Engage me with your story.” “Focus on the benefits to customers of acquiring/using your product. Does it simplify? Make money? Save money? Open new markets?” “Differentiate your business in some way from the competition - market channel, service, technical features, etc.” “Don't give me unclear, irrelevant, or unnecessary information. It is extremely important to your success that you winnow the full amount of information into the particular subset that is required for this presentation.” “Don't try to impress me with a lot of jargon.” —Angel Investors 2013 Cleantech Open | 20
    21. 21. 2013 Cleantech Open | 21 From the Horse’s Mouth “Challenge yourself to deliver an 'easy-to-understand' story. Could I, your listener, replay to another person the very basics of your venture and how your target customers will benefit from using your product?” “Infuse passion throughout your delivery. Engage me with your story.” “Focus on the benefits to customers of acquiring/using your product. Does it simplify? Make money? Save money? Open new markets?” “Differentiate your business in some way from the competition - market channel, service, technical features, etc.” “Don't give me unclear, irrelevant, or unnecessary information. It is extremely important to your success that you winnow the full amount of information into the particular subset that is required for this presentation.” “Don't try to impress me with a lot of jargon.” —Angel Investors 2013 Cleantech Open | 21
    22. 22. 2013 Cleantech Open | 22 From the Horse’s Mouth “Challenge yourself to deliver an 'easy-to-understand' story. Could I, your listener, replay to another person the very basics of your venture and how your target customers will benefit from using your product?” “Infuse passion throughout your delivery. Engage me with your story.” “Focus on the benefits to customers of acquiring/using your product. Does it simplify? Make money? Save money? Open new markets?” “Differentiate your business in some way from the competition - market channel, service, technical features, etc.” “Don't give me unclear, irrelevant, or unnecessary information. It is extremely important to your success that you winnow the full amount of information into the particular subset that is required for this presentation.” “Don't try to impress me with a lot of jargon.” —Angel Investors 2013 Cleantech Open | 22
    23. 23. 2013 Cleantech Open | 23 What You Say: Three Rules About Using Words 2013 Cleantech Open | 23
    24. 24. 2013 Cleantech Open | 24 Rule #1 You’re selling a business, not a technology. 2013 Cleantech Open | 24
    25. 25. 2013 Cleantech Open | 25 You’re selling a business, not a technology. What We Mean by This • Don’t get so caught up in the technical innovation that you fail to make the business case. • Focus on building confidence in the viability of your business plan in addition to the feasibility of your technology. • Always establish context — using reference points valued by investors, as well as technologists. 2013 Cleantech Open | 25
    26. 26. 2013 Cleantech Open | 26 You’re selling a business, not a technology. DON’T “Reverse osmosis (RO) involves the reversal of flow through a membrane from a high salinity, or concentrated, solution to the high purity, or ‘permeate,’ stream on the opposite side of the membrane. Pressure is used as the driving force for the separation. The applied pressure (P) must be in excess of the osmotic pressure of the dissolved contaminants to allow flow across the membrane. “Our technologies use spiral-wound membranes to desalt and demineral- ize process water. The membrane's operating conditions are fine-tuned to balance the flux with the specific rejection rates of contaminants to achieve up to 99.8% salt rejection at low pressures and high flux rates.” 2013 Cleantech Open | 26
    27. 27. 2013 Cleantech Open | 27 You’re selling a business, not a technology. DO “Reverse osmosis separation technology is used to remove impurities from water through the use of a semi-permeable membrane. It is effective in the removal of dissolved solids, bacteria, pyrogens and organic contaminants. “Our technology is used by municipalities and industrial facilities to ensure a consistently pure drinking water supply and to transform drinking water to high purity water for industrial use in the production of microelectronics, food and beverage, power, and pharmaceuticals.” 2013 Cleantech Open | 27
    28. 28. 2013 Cleantech Open | 28 You’re selling a business, not a technology. The Cheat Sheet  Would someone without a Ph.D. understand it?  Would someone without an MBA understand it?  Have you used colorful language? What color? • Go through your talking points and circle every feature of your company’s core offering in purple. • Now go through the same text and circle every business benefit you mention in green.  Are you talking “how” or “why”? • Have you explained how your technical advantage (how your innovation works) translates into business value (why it’s worth investing in)? • Is it credible? 2013 Cleantech Open | 28
    29. 29. 2013 Cleantech Open | 29 Rule #2 Net it down. Net. It. Down. 2013 Cleantech Open | 29
    30. 30. 2013 Cleantech Open | 30 Net it down. Net. It. Down. What We Mean by This • Use as few words as possible to say exactly what you mean. • Define your main points, and make them clearly and concisely. Remember: no one remembers everything. • Stick to the facts; judges will form their own opinions. 2013 Cleantech Open | 30
    31. 31. 2013 Cleantech Open | 31 Net it down. Net. It. Down. DON’T “Company X’s charging stations provide unique benefits when compared to non- networked charging stations. Those benefits include: • A charging infrastructure open to all drivers without requiring subscriptions • A revenue stream to pay for electricity, capital equipment and maintenance • Ability for drivers to find unoccupied charging stations via web-enabled cell phones • Notification by SMS text or email when charging is complete • Authenticated access to eliminate energy theft • Authorized energizing for safety • Remote monitoring and diagnostics for superior quality of service • Smart Grid integration for utility load management with future V2G capabilities • Green House Gas savings calculation per driver and per fleet • Fleet vehicle management” 2013 Cleantech Open | 31
    32. 32. 2013 Cleantech Open | 32 Net it down. Net. It. Down. DO “Company X’s charging stations provide many advantages over non- networked charging stations, including: Convenience for drivers, thanks to an existing infrastructure that lets drivers use their cell phones to find unoccupied charging stations and find out when charging is complete—all without requiring a subscription; Easy operation for station managers thanks to remote monitoring and diagnostics, smart grid integration and greenhouse gas calculators and fleet vehicle management capabilities; and Low cost of ownership, given a revenue stream that pays for electricity, capital equipment and maintenance.” 2013 Cleantech Open | 32
    33. 33. 2013 Cleantech Open | 33 Net it down. Net. It. Down. The Cheat Sheet  What’s the big takeaway? • Ask five people to read through your deck and tell you in a single sentence what your greatest strength is as a business. • If you get five answers, you’re in trouble.  Are your ideas snugly nested? • Are your thoughts organized in a coherent hierarchy? • Are main points clearly supported by secondary information?  Could you cut your word count by 10%? 20%? 50%? • If so, do. 2013 Cleantech Open | 33
    34. 34. 2013 Cleantech Open | 34 Rule #3 Tell them a story. 2013 Cleantech Open | 34
    35. 35. 2013 Cleantech Open | 35 Tell them a story. What We Mean by This • Open with a “grabber” – a statement or scenario that is provocative, surprising or both. • Keep it moving; don’t belabor your point. Keep the energy up and the momentum going. • Remember: It’s a story, but it’s still nonfiction. Make sure your story can stand up to scrutiny. • Leave them with a memorable touchstone. The goal is to introduce the audience to an idea that sticks in their minds long after you’re done talking. 2013 Cleantech Open | 35
    36. 36. 2013 Cleantech Open | 36 Tell them a story. DON’T “Quantitatively, spending on security-related systems and services to which the Company's products will be applied exceeded $22 billion in 2007. This spending was entirely on legacy systems, which did not offer the new solution elements being introduced by Company X. It is the Company's belief, that as considerable as the market for legacy, security- only systems is, an entirely new, even larger, supply-side driven set of market metrics will come to bear when Company X’s emergency response solutions are introduced into the marketplace. The Company's products and technologies will allow it to expand the market with its new paradigm of true emergency response technologies. The Company measures the markets for its vertically integrated markets to be in excess of $1.5 billion per year annually. The Company estimates…” 2013 Cleantech Open | 36
    37. 37. 2013 Cleantech Open | 37 Tell them a story. DO “A hiker heads back to the trailhead after a five-mile trek on a remote path ten miles from her suburban home. As the sun begins to set, she sees a man she doesn’t recognize sitting on the trunk of her car. She pushes a button on the cell phone in her pocket. A signal is sent to the closest cell tower and to a GPS satellite, activating the local authorities’ emergency response protocols. Within minutes, squad cars and an EMT unit are closing in on her location, which they can track live thanks to her System X mobile security subscription.” 2013 Cleantech Open | 37
    38. 38. 2013 Cleantech Open | 38 Tell them a story. The Cheat Sheet  Does your introduction have stopping power? • Circle every statement in your talking points that could start a water cooler discussion. If there are more than two or three, rethink your approach. If there are none, rethink your approach.  Can we connect the dots? • Could we scan the slides in your deck chronologically and get the gist of your story? • Would we want to? I.e., are they interesting?  Are you conveying facts or opinions? • Go through your pitch with a red pen. Circle every statement that expresses an opinion. • Either delete the sentence, or revise it to state a fact. 2013 Cleantech Open | 38
    39. 39. 2013 Cleantech Open | 39 It’s As Difficult As… Sell the business, not the technology. Net it down. Tell a story. 1 2 3 2013 Cleantech Open | 39
    40. 40. 2013 Cleantech Open | 40 Your Presentation = Words + Pictures (And that probably means PowerPoint) 2013 Cleantech Open | 40
    41. 41. 2013 Cleantech Open | 41 PowerPoint doesn’t kill presentations. People do. 2013 Cleantech Open | 41
    42. 42. 2013 Cleantech Open | 42 How PowerPoint Differs From Print REAL ESTATE There is limited space in which to convey ideas and information 2013 Cleantech Open | 42
    43. 43. 2013 Cleantech Open | 43 How PowerPoint Differs From Print FONT SIZE Text must be visible from a distance REAL ESTATE There is limited space in which to convey ideas and information 2013 Cleantech Open | 43
    44. 44. 2013 Cleantech Open | 44 How PowerPoint Differs From Print TIME People have about a minute to absorb what’s on screen FONT SIZE Text must be visible from a distance REAL ESTATE There is limited space in which to convey ideas and information 2013 Cleantech Open | 44
    45. 45. 2013 Cleantech Open | 45 What Annoys People About PowerPoint Speakers who just recite the text on the slide 2013 Cleantech Open | 45
    46. 46. 2013 Cleantech Open | 46 What Annoys People About PowerPoint Text too small to read from the back of a room 2013 Cleantech Open | 46
    47. 47. 2013 Cleantech Open | 47 What Annoys People About PowerPoint Long sentences rather than bullet points (i.e., people who feel compelled to type out their thoughts in granular detail (in complete sentences, punctuated perfectly) when a short phrase would actually be easier to absorb and comprehend while the presenter is speaking) 2013 Cleantech Open | 47
    48. 48. 2013 Cleantech Open | 48 What Annoys People About PowerPoint Text superimposed over imagery 2013 Cleantech Open | 48
    49. 49. 2013 Cleantech Open | 49 What Annoys People About PowerPoint Slides that are hard to see due to color choice 2013 Cleantech Open | 49
    50. 50. 2013 Cleantech Open | 50 What Annoys People About PowerPoint Overly complex diagrams or charts (“I know you can’t read this, but…”) 2013 Cleantech Open | 50
    51. 51. 2013 Cleantech Open | 51 What Makes a Great Slide Presentation It’s “show and tell,” not “write and read” 2013 Cleantech Open | 51
    52. 52. 2013 Cleantech Open | 52 Before 151 words 2013 Cleantech Open | 52
    53. 53. 2013 Cleantech Open | 53 After A picture 2013 Cleantech Open | 53
    54. 54. 2013 Cleantech Open | 54 What Makes a Great Slide Presentation Conveys lots of information in a short time 2013 Cleantech Open | 54
    55. 55. 2013 Cleantech Open | 55 What Makes a Great Slide Presentation Makes concepts, trends and patterns visual, so they’re more memorable Infrastructure Spending by State and Sector 2013 Cleantech Open | 55
    56. 56. 2013 Cleantech Open | 56 What You Show: Three Rules About Using Pictures 2013 Cleantech Open | 56
    57. 57. 2013 Cleantech Open | 57 Rule #1 You’re selling a business, not a technology. How graphics vs. why graphics Deciding what kind of data to show Making your case—not someone else’s 2013 Cleantech Open | 57
    58. 58. 2013 Cleantech Open | 58 You’re selling a business, not a technology. How Graphics This diagram shows us how energy is lost as power goes from generation to consumption. 2013 Cleantech Open | 58
    59. 59. 2013 Cleantech Open | 59 You’re selling a business, not a technology. How Graphics vs. Why Graphics This graphic shows why energy efficiency matters. 2013 Cleantech Open | 59
    60. 60. 2013 Cleantech Open | 60 You’re selling a business, not a technology. Deciding What Kind of Data to Show This table shows the growth in the number of solar towers over the course of 30 years. 2013 Cleantech Open | 60
    61. 61. 2013 Cleantech Open | 61 You’re selling a business, not a technology. Deciding What Kind of Data to Show This line graph uses the same data to show us the financial implications of this trend. 2013 Cleantech Open | 61
    62. 62. 2013 Cleantech Open | 62 You’re selling a business, not a technology. Making Your Case — Not Someone Else’s This slide makes the case for an industry category. Solar Hot Water: 20 Panels 2013 Cleantech Open | 62
    63. 63. 2013 Cleantech Open | 63 You’re selling a business, not a technology. Making Your Case — Not Someone Else’s This slide makes the case for the presenter’s particular business. Aquasola™ Solution: 20 Panels 2013 Cleantech Open | 63
    64. 64. 2013 Cleantech Open | 64 Rule #2 Net it down. Net. It. Down. Too many key messages = no key messages Visual hierarchy and organization Saying more with less 2013 Cleantech Open | 64
    65. 65. 2013 Cleantech Open | 65 Net it down. Net. It. Down. Too Many Messages = No Message Follow the 7/7 rule, or you’ll wind up with too much text on a slide. 2013 Cleantech Open | 65
    66. 66. 2013 Cleantech Open | 66 Net it down. Net. It. Down. Too Many Messages = No Message Here’s a slide about being succinct. It is succinct. Identify your core message1 Structure your presentation2 Use fewer, shorter bullets3 Use simple, relevant visuals4 Successful slides are succinct. 2013 Cleantech Open | 66
    67. 67. 2013 Cleantech Open | 67 Net it down. Net. It. Down. Visual Hierarchy and Organization This graphic does not tell us what is most important. There is no Big Idea because there are 3 big ideas, 2 medium- sized ideas and 2 smallish ideas. 2013 Cleantech Open | 67
    68. 68. 2013 Cleantech Open | 68 Net it down. Net. It. Down. Visual Hierarchy and Organization This graphic makes it very clear what the big idea is, and how the other points support that idea. 2013 Cleantech Open | 68
    69. 69. 2013 Cleantech Open | 69 Net it down. Net. It. Down. Saying More With Less Two graphs, lots of data. Total World Energy Consumption by Source (2010) 2013 Cleantech Open | 69
    70. 70. 2013 Cleantech Open | 70 Net it down. Net. It. Down. Saying More With Less Same data, one graph. Total World Energy Consumption by Source (2010) 2013 Cleantech Open | 70
    71. 71. 2013 Cleantech Open | 71 Rule #3 Tell them a story. Identifying the star of the drama (Hint: It’s not you.) Signaling a turning point From vision to conclusion 2013 Cleantech Open | 71
    72. 72. 2013 Cleantech Open | 72 Tell them a story. Identifying the Star of the Drama This slide talks about an impending humanitarian crisis. 2013 Cleantech Open | 72
    73. 73. 2013 Cleantech Open | 73 Tell them a story. Identifying the Star of the Drama Same information, different impact. 2013 Cleantech Open | 73
    74. 74. 2013 Cleantech Open | 74 Tell them a story. Signaling a Turning Point If the problem looks like this,… 97%= landfill 2013 Cleantech Open | 74
    75. 75. 2013 Cleantech Open | 75 Tell them a story. Signaling a Turning Point …then the solution looks like this. 90 days biodegrades completely in 2013 Cleantech Open | 75
    76. 76. 2013 Cleantech Open | 76 Tell them a story. From Vision… Recap the big picture to remind them of your credibility… 2013 Cleantech Open | 76 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    77. 77. 2013 Cleantech Open | 77 Tell them a story. From Vision to Conclusion …and to provide both confidence and context. Close strong. 2013 Cleantech Open | 77 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 $2M will enable us to scale production in 2016 and double margins in 2.5 years.
    78. 78. 2013 Cleantech Open | 78 It’s As Difficult As… Sell the business, not the technology. Net it down. Tell a story. 1 2 3 2013 Cleantech Open | 78
    79. 79. 2013 Cleantech Open | 79 Q & A Anybody? 2013 Cleantech Open | 79
    80. 80. 2013 Cleantech Open | 80 Resources • Tips the Space Telescope Science Institute’s put together to help scientists prepare PowerPoint presentations for colloquia and webcasts: www.stsci.edu/ts/webcasting/ppt/PowerPointCalibration2.ppt • Slide:ology: The Art & Science of Creating Great Presentations by Nancy Duarte: http://www.amazon.com/slide-ology-Science-Creating- Presentations/dp/0596522347/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=12524718 58&sr=8-1 • Presentation Zen: Simple Ideas for Presentation Design & Delivery by Garr Reynolds: http://www.amazon.com/Presentation-Zen-Simple-Design- Delivery/dp/0321525655/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1252471934&sr =1-1 2013 Cleantech Open | 80
    81. 81. 2013 Cleantech Open | 81 positpartners.com What do you say?™ hollie@positpartners.com maia@positpartners.com
    82. 82. Reminders
    83. 83. 83 Cleantech Open Confidential Information – All Rights Reserved September 10th Deliverables Tuesday, September 10, 11:59pm, Pacific Daylight Time • Deadline for submitting your completed worksheets and required additional documents – Eight (8) worksheets in your dashboard, plus • Business Model Canvas - If you are using LaunchPad Central, export your Business Model Canvas from the system then convert to pdf before uploading. • Financial Projections – Executive Summary – Investor Presentation – but you can fine tune until October Go to “September 10th Deliverables” on Accelerator wiki homepage for templates & list
    84. 84. 84 Cleantech Open Confidential Information – All Rights Reserved Reminders • Be posting your answers to the online worksheets – accessed through your Dashboard • Complete the webinar surveys • No webinar Tuesday, September 2nd • September 10th – “Last Chance for Questions” Webinar – 1:30pm to 2:30pm, PDT • September 11th – Session 1: Investor Presentation Review & Mentor Evaluation - 1:30pm to 2:30pm, PDT – Session 2: Overview of the Next 3 Months - 2:45pm-4:00pm, PDT

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