Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsLesson OverviewLesson Overview7.4 Homeostasis and...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsTHINK ABOUT ITThe diversity of life is so great t...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsThe Cell as an OrganismHow do individual cells ma...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsThe Cell as an OrganismHow do individual cells ma...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsThe Cell as an OrganismA single-celled, or unicel...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsThe Cell as an OrganismIn terms of their numbers,...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsThe Cell as an OrganismMany eukaryotes also spend...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsThe Cell as an OrganismWhether a prokaryote or a ...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsMulticellular LifeHow do the cells of multicellul...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsMulticellular LifeHow do the cells of multicellul...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsMulticellular LifeThe cells of multicellular orga...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsCell SpecializationThe cells of multicellular org...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsSpecialized Animal CellsParticles of dust, smoke,...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsSpecialized Plant CellsPollen grains are highly s...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsLevels of OrganizationThe specialized cells of mu...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsLevels of OrganizationA tissue is a group of simi...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsLevels of OrganizationTo perform complicated task...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsA group of organs that work together to perform a...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsLevels of OrganizationThe organization of the bod...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsCellular CommunicationCells in a large organism c...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsCellular CommunicationSome cells form connections...
Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsCellular CommunicationOther junctions allow small...
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CVA Biology I - B10vrv3074

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CVA Biology I - B10vrv3074

  1. 1. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsLesson OverviewLesson Overview7.4 Homeostasis and Cells7.4 Homeostasis and Cells
  2. 2. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsTHINK ABOUT ITThe diversity of life is so great that you might have to remind yourselfthat all living things are composed of cells, use the same basicchemistry, and even contain the same kinds of organelles.This does not mean that all living things are the same. Differences arisefrom the ways in which cells are specialized and the ways in which cellsassociate with one another to form multicellular organisms.
  3. 3. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsThe Cell as an OrganismHow do individual cells maintain homeostasis?
  4. 4. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsThe Cell as an OrganismHow do individual cells maintain homeostasis?To maintain homeostasis, unicellular organisms grow, respond to theenvironment, transform energy, and reproduce.
  5. 5. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsThe Cell as an OrganismA single-celled, or unicellular, organism does everything you would expecta living thing to do.Just like other living things, unicellular organisms must achievehomeostasis, relatively constant internal physical and chemical conditions.To maintain homeostasis, unicellular organisms grow, respond to theenvironment, transform energy, and reproduce.
  6. 6. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsThe Cell as an OrganismIn terms of their numbers, unicellular organisms dominate life on Earth.Unicellular organisms include both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.Prokaryotes, especially bacteria, are remarkably adaptable and live almosteverywhere—in the soil, on leaves, in the ocean, in the air, and even withinthe human body.
  7. 7. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsThe Cell as an OrganismMany eukaryotes also spend their lives as single cells.Some types of algae, which contain chloroplasts and are found in oceans,lakes, and streams around the world, are single celled.Yeasts, or unicellular fungi, are also widespread. Yeasts play an importantrole in breaking down complex nutrients, which makes them available forother organisms.
  8. 8. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsThe Cell as an OrganismWhether a prokaryote or a eukaryote, homeostasis is an issue for eachunicellular organism.Every unicellular organism needs to find sources of energy or food, to keepconcentrations of water and minerals within certain levels, and to respondquickly to changes in its environment.
  9. 9. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsMulticellular LifeHow do the cells of multicellular organisms work together to maintainhomeostasis?
  10. 10. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsMulticellular LifeHow do the cells of multicellular organisms work together to maintainhomeostasis?The cells of multicellular organisms become specialized for particular tasksand communicate with one another to maintain homeostasis.
  11. 11. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsMulticellular LifeThe cells of multicellular organisms are interdependent, and like themembers of a successful baseball team, they work together.In baseball, players take on a particular role, such as pitcher, catcher,infielder, or outfielder. Messages and signals are sent and understood byteammates and coaches to play the game effectively.Cells in a multicellular organism work the same way. The cells ofmulticellular organisms become specialized for particular tasks andcommunicate with one another in order to maintain homeostasis.
  12. 12. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsCell SpecializationThe cells of multicellular organisms are specialized, with different celltypes playing different roles.Some cells are specialized to move, others to react to the environment,and still others to produce substances that the organism needs.No matter what the role, each specialized cell contributes to the overallhomeostasis of the organism.
  13. 13. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsSpecialized Animal CellsParticles of dust, smoke, and bacteria are part of even the cleanest air.Specialized animal cells act like street sweepers to keep the particlesout of the lungs.These cells are full of mitochondria, which provide a steady supply ofthe ATP that powers the cilia on their upper surfaces.
  14. 14. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsSpecialized Plant CellsPollen grains are highly specialized cells that are tiny and light, withthick cell walls to protect the cell’s contents.Pine pollen grains have two tiny wings that enable the slightest breezeto carry them great distances.
  15. 15. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsLevels of OrganizationThe specialized cells of multicellular organisms are organized intotissues, then into organs, and finally into organ systems.
  16. 16. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsLevels of OrganizationA tissue is a group of similar cells that performs a particular function.
  17. 17. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsLevels of OrganizationTo perform complicated tasks, many groups of tissues work together asan organ.Each type of tissue performs an essential task to help the organfunction.In most cases, an organ completes a series of specialized tasks.
  18. 18. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsA group of organs that work together to perform a specific function iscalled an organ system.For example, the stomach, pancreas, and intestines work together asthe digestive system.Levels of Organization
  19. 19. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsLevels of OrganizationThe organization of the body’s cells into tissues, organs, and organsystems creates a division of labor among those cells that allows theorganism to maintain homeostasis.
  20. 20. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsCellular CommunicationCells in a large organism communicate by means of chemical signalsthat are passed from one cell to another.These cellular signals can speed up or slow down the activities of thecells that receive them, and can cause a cell to change what it is doing.
  21. 21. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsCellular CommunicationSome cells form connections, or cellular junctions, to neighboring cells.Some junctions hold cells firmly together.
  22. 22. Lesson OverviewLesson Overview Homeostasis and CellsHomeostasis and CellsCellular CommunicationOther junctions allow small molecules carrying chemical messages topass directly from one cell to the next.To respond to one of these chemical signals, a cell must have areceptor to which the signaling molecule can bind. Sometimes thesereceptors are on the cell membrane, although the receptors for certaintypes of signals are inside the cytoplasm.The chemical signals sent by various types of cells can cause importantchanges in cellular activity. For example, such junctions enable the cellsof the heart muscle to contract in a coordinated fashion.

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