CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp     8/12/10     3:57 PM   Page 1                   1                               The Birth of    ...
CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp    8/12/10    3:57 PM    Page 2                            Global Perspective          Civilization...
CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp     8/12/10     3:57 PM     Page 3           the Mauryan along the Ganges, the Han in China—during ...
CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp   8/12/10        3:57 PM        Page 4                                                             ...
CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp                                                                                              8/12/1...
CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp      8/12/10       3:57 PM      Page 6          6            Part 1 Human Origins and Early Civiliz...
CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp        8/12/10       3:57 PM       Page 7                                                          ...
CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp            8/12/10      3:57 PM      Page 8          8                 Part 1 Human Origins and Ear...
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
The birth of civilizations
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

The birth of civilizations

3,488 views

Published on

Published in: Education
1 Comment
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • words are just too small to see...
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,488
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
90
Comments
1
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The birth of civilizations

  1. 1. CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp 8/12/10 3:57 PM Page 1 1 The Birth of Civilization ■ Early Humans and Their Culture ■ Early Civilizations in the Middle East to about 1000 B.C.E. ■ Ancient Near Eastern Empires ■ Early Indian Civilization ■ Early Chinese Civilization ■ The Rise of Civilization in the Americas S CIENTISTS ESTIMATE THAT THE EARTH MAY BE AS many as 6 billion years old and that the first humanlike creatures ap- peared in Africa perhaps 3 to 5 million years ago. Some 1 to 2 million years ago, erect and tool-using early humans spread over much of Africa, Europe, and Asia (see Map 1–1 on page 4). Our own species, Homo sapiens, probably emerged some 200,000 years ago, and the earliest remains of fully modern humans date to about 100,000 years ago. The earliest humans lived by hunting, fishing, and collecting wild plants. Only some 10,000 years ago did they learn to cultivate plants, herd animals, and make A carved or etched limestone statue, from about 2500 B.C.E., believed by scholars to be a airtight pottery for storage. These discov- king or a priest from Mohenjo-Daro in the Indus valley in present-day Pakistan. eries transformed them from gatherers to producers and allowed them to grow in number and to lead a settled life. Begin- ning about 5,000 years ago a far more 1
  2. 2. CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp 8/12/10 3:57 PM Page 2 Global Perspective Civilizations The way of life of prehistoric cave dwellers Then, from about 7000 B.C.E., innovations began. Hu- differed immensely from that of today’s mans learned to till the soil, domesticate animals, and civilized world. Yet the few millennia in make pots for the storage of food. A few millennia later, which we have been civilized are but a tiny bronze was discovered, and the so-called river valley civi- fraction of the long span of human exis- lizations formed along the Nile, the Tigris-Euphrates, the The World tence. Especially during the recent millen- Indus, and the Yellow rivers. Cities arose. Writing was in- nia, changes in our culture/way of life have vented. Societies divided into classes or castes: Most far outpaced changes in our bodies. We retain the emotional members engaged in farming, a few traded, and others as- makeup and motor reflexes of prehistoric men and women sumed military, priestly, or governmental roles. As these civ- while living highly organized and often sedentary lives. ilizations expanded, they became richer, more populous, and We might best view the early civilizations by asking how more powerful. they fit into the sweep of history. One notable feature of The last millennium B.C.E. witnessed two major develop- human history is the acceleration in the pace of change. From ments. One was the emergence, between roughly 600–300 the time that modern humans first appeared 100,000 years B.C.E., of the religious and philosophical revolutions that would ago until 7000 B.C.E., few changes occurred. Humans migrated indelibly mark their respective civilizations: monotheistic Ju- from Africa to other parts of the world and adapted to new daism from which would later develop the world religions of climes. All lived by hunting, fishing, and gathering. The chief Christianity and Islam; Hinduism and Buddhism in southern advance in technology during this longest span of human exis- Asia; the philosophies of Greece and China. The second de- tence was from rough to smooth stone weapons and tools. velopment was the rise of the Iron Age empires—the Roman, complex way of life began to appear in some parts of from one generation to another. Our flexible and dexterous the world. In these places humans learned how to hands enable us to hold and make tools and so to create increase harvests through irrigation and other meth- the material artifacts of culture. Because culture is learned ods, making possible much larger populations. They and not inherited, it permits rapid adaptation to changing came together in towns, cities, and other centers, conditions, making possible the spread of humanity to al- most all the lands of the globe. where they erected impressive structures and where industry and commerce flourished. They developed writing, enabling them to keep inventories of food The Paleolithic Age and other resources. Specialized occupations Anthropologists designate early human cultures by their emerged, complex religions took form, and social di- tools. The earliest period—the Paleolithic Age (from the visions increased. These changes marked the birth Greek, “old stone”)—dates from Read the Document of civilization. ■ From Hunter-gatherers to Food- the earliest use of stone tools some producers–Overcoming Obstacles 1 million years ago to about 10,000 at MyHistoryLab.com B.C.E. During this immensely long Early Humans and Their Culture period, people were hunters, fishers, and gatherers, but not producers, of food. They learned to make and use increas- Humans, unlike other animals, are cultural beings. ingly sophisticated tools of stone and perishable materials Culture is the sum total of the ways of living built up by like wood; they learned to make and control fire; and they ac- a group and passed on from one generation to another. quired language and the ability to use it to pass on what they Culture includes behavior such as courtship or child- had learned. rearing practices; material things such as tools, clothing, These early humans, dependent on nature for food and and shelter; and ideas, institutions, and beliefs. Language, vulnerable to wild beasts and natural disasters, may have de- apparently a uniquely human trait, lies behind our ability veloped responses to the world rooted in fear of the un- to create ideas and institutions and to transmit culture known—of the uncertainties of human life or the overpowering 2
  3. 3. CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp 8/12/10 3:57 PM Page 3 the Mauryan along the Ganges, the Han in China—during the in alluvial valleys favorable to cultivation? Was it inevitable centuries straddling the end of the millennium. that the firing of clay to produce pots would produce metals After the fall of these early empires, swift changes oc- from metallic oxides and lead to the discovery of smelting? curred. For a millennium, Europe and Byzantium fell behind, Did the formation of aristocratic and priestly classes auto- while China and the Middle East led in technology and the matically lead to record keeping and writing? If so, it is not at arts of government. But by 1500 Europe had caught up, and all surprising that parallel and independent developments after 1700, it led. India had developed the numerals that later should have occurred in regions as widely separated as came to Europe as “Arabic numbers” and Arab thinkers in- , China and the Middle East. spired the Renaissance, but it was Europe that produced Or was the almost simultaneous rise of the ancient Copernicus and Newton. Eurasian civilizations the result of diffusion? Did migrating The nineteenth century saw the invention of the steam peoples carry seeds, new tools, and metals over long dis- engine, the steamship, the locomotive, the telegraph and tele- tances? The available evidence provides no definitive an- phone, and the automobile. After that came electric lights, the swer. Understanding the origins of the early civilizations and radio, and, in the century that followed, the airplane. the lives of the men and women who lived in them from In the twentieth century, invention and scientific discov- what is left of their material culture is like reconstructing a ery became institutionalized in university, corporate, and gov- dinosaur from a broken tooth and a fragment of jawbone. ernment laboratories. Ever larger amounts of resources were committed to research. By the beginning of the twenty-first century man had walked on the moon, deciphered the human genome, and unlocked the power of the atom. Today, Focus Questions as discoveries occur ever more rapidly, we cannot imagine ■ What were the processes behind the creation of early the science of a hundred years into the future. civilizations? If this process of accelerating change had its origins in ■ What are the similarities and differences among the 7000 B.C.E., what was the original impetus? Does the logic of world’s earliest civilizations? nature dictate that once agriculture develops, cities will rise ■ Why has the pace of change accelerated with time? forces of nature. Religious and magical beliefs and practices hunters were too numerous, game would not suffice. In Pa- may have emerged in an effort to propitiate or coerce the su- leolithic times people were subject to the same natural and perhuman forces thought to animate ecological constraints that today mantain a balance between Read the Document The Development of Religion in or direct the natural world. Evidence wolves and deer in Alaska. Primitive Cultures of religious faith and practice, as Paleolithic society was probably characterized by a divi- at MyHistoryLab.com well as of magic, goes as far back as sion of labor by sex. Men most likely hunted, fished, and archaeology can take us. Fear or awe, exultation, gratitude, fought other families, clans, and tribes. Women, less mobile and empathy with the natural world must all have figured in because of childbearing, most likely gathered nuts, berries, the cave art and in the ritual practices, such as burial, that we and wild grains, wove baskets, and made clothing. Women find evidenced at Paleolithic sites around the globe. The gathering food probably discovered how to plant and care for sense that there is more to the world than meets the eye—in seeds, knowledge that eventually led to agriculture and the other words, the religious response to the world—seems to be Neolithic Revolution. as old as humankind. During the Paleolithic Age, most likely relatively near its The Neolithic Age close, humans, probably pursuing game, crossed from Asia See the Map through the region of the Bering Sea, Only a few Paleolithic societies made the initial shift from Prehistoric Human which was then dry land, into the Ameri- hunting and gathering to agriculture. Anthropologists and ar- Migration Patterns: From 1 million to can continent (see Map 1–1). This migra- chaeologists disagree as to why, but however it happened, some 15,000 years ago tion would ultimately separate their de- See the Map 10,000 years ago parts of what we now call at MyHistoryLab.com scendants from other human groups for The Beginnings of Food the Middle East began to change from a no- many thousands of years. In their isolation, however, the Production madic hunter-gatherer culture to a more at MyHistoryLab.com inhabitants of the Americas experienced cultural changes settled agricultural one. Because the shift to parallel to those of Eurasia and Africa. agriculture coincided with advances in stone tool technology— The style of life and the level of technology of the Pale- the development of greater precision, for example, in chipping olithic period could support only a sparsely settled society. If and grinding—this period is called the Neolithic Age (from the 3
  4. 4. CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp 8/12/10 3:57 PM Page 4 Old Crow Mackenzie Bluefish Cave G reenl and Dry Creek Co Ice rdil S le eet Laurentide ra h n n s Ice corridor opened Ice Sheet Settled by 35,000 BCE from 11,300 BCE a i Lake Aggassiz n t Lake N O RT H Gough’s Cave Engis o u Missoula Lake Minong AMERICA Great e EUROPE renc M Wilson Butte Lake Lakes aw Lascaux L La Madeleine Chippewa St. s Cave Mi n ai Cro-Magnon y nt ssouri Lake Lake Meadowcroft Altamira Grimaldi k Lahontan Bonneville Shriver ou Last Neanderthals c M die out at c.27,000 BCE Mazouro Chauvet n o Lamb Kimmswoci a hi R ac Strait of Gibraltar: Spring Nerja pi al First hominids arrive in Europe from s Calico p lain p Ap Africa nearly 1 million years ago ssi Hills Clovis si Las Palomas Afalou Bou P Mis San Diego eat Thomas Rhummel Gr Rio Early human settlers Quarries P A Gr hunted North America ande megafauna (mastodons, mammoths, and many other species) as climate change C I made such animals extinct. S a Arid Sahara enters h F moister phase c.9000 BCE AT L A N T I C I C Valsequillo West In dies OCEAN Nig er El Bosque S a h e l O Taimataima C o noc E Ori A Gui ana Hig N s hla nd El Inga s e d A m a z o n Amazon n B a s i n A Guitarrero Pedra Furada Cave SOUTH early classical settlement Francisco AMERICA Pikimachay São A n Alice Böer d Paraná es Querero Monte Pa Patagonia settled The spread of modern humans Verde by 11,000 BCE tag possible colonization route on major site 50,000–12,000 BCE ia extent of ice sheet 18,000 BCE extent of ice sheet 10,000 BCE Fell’s Cave coastline 18,000 BCE ancient river ancient lake Map 1–1. Early Human Migrations. 4
  5. 5. CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp 8/12/10 3:57 PM Page 5 Last dwarf mammoths become extinct c.3000 BCE Wrangel I s l and Lena Yenis ey Settled by c.45,000 BCE Ob ’ e r i a Volga S i b Sunghir Am Pushkari Mal’ta ur Kostienki MladecE Predmostí Mezhirich G o b i C Dolní Aral as Vçstonice Sea A S I A pia Black Sea Yellow Ri ve r Zhoukoudian nS Japan Hons Lake ea hu Romanelli Tig Hoshino Lake Konya ris Shanidar Fukuiu up E hra Earliest settlers H tes Yangtz Haua i e c.40,000 BCE m Fleah a l Ga a y a Yuanmou us First evidence of ng s Ind human burials se P A C I F Mabah a r a Bhimbetka East Asia: Arabian India Nazlet Khatir Earliest evidence for Peninsula Patne hominid colonization Nile dates to c.1.7 million years ago M eko ng I C Mega Ph ilippin e Chad First settled Islands c.60,000 BCE Tabon Cave O A F R I C A Lake Galla Sunda C Niah Cave E A Olduvai Gorge: Congo Site of first discoveries of Lake Victoria Australopithecus boisei and INDIAN B orneo N Homo habilis, dating from Su G r e a t R i f t Va l l e y G r e a t R i f t Va l l e y c.2.5 million years ago Pamwak ma OCEAN tra Olduvai Gorge New Nombe Kisese Earliest evidence Guinea Solomon Java of use of boats Islands Kosipe Migration of early Sahul modern humans begins c.150,000 years ago Australia: Fully modern humans colonize Australia Zambezi Lake from Southeast Asia, from c.60,000 years Cur peutaria ago; they utilize land bridges created by Koolan lowered sea levels during last Ice Age r Southern Africa: asca Lake From c.120,000 years ago, Makgadikgadi early hominids colonize Cuckadoo dag more marginal areas Earliest African of Africa Ma rock art Puritjarra Kenniff Cave Kalahari Lion Cave Desert Border Cave A u s t r a l i a Apollo 11 Cave Orange R r ive Boomplaas Koonalda Cave g rlin Klasies River Da Mouth Panaramitee Lake Mungo Arumvale Lake Earliest evidence of human cremation Nawait Kow Swamp c.26,000 BCE Keilor New Zealand Tasmania Beginner’s Luck Cave Bone Cave 5
  6. 6. CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp 8/12/10 3:57 PM Page 6 6 Part 1 Human Origins and Early Civilizations to 500 B.C.E. Once they had domesticated these plants and animals, people could move to areas where these plants and ani- mals did not occur naturally, such as the river valleys of the region. The in- vention of pottery during the Neolithic Age enabled people to store surplus foods and liquids Hear the Audio and to transport at MyHistoryLab.com them, as well as to cook agricul- tural products that were difficult to eat or digest raw. They made cloth from flax and wool. Because crops required constant care from planting to harvest, Ne- olithic farmers built permanent dwellings. The earliest of these dwellings tended to be circular huts, large enough to house only one or two people and clustered in groups around a central storage place. Later people built square and rectangular family-sized houses with individual storage places and enclosures to house livestock. Houses in a Ne- olithic village were normally all the same size and were built on the same plan, suggesting that most Neolithic villagers had about the same level of wealth and social status. A few items, Read the Document such as stones The Neolithic Village and shells, at MyHistoryLab.com were traded long distance, but Neolithic villages tended to be self-sufficient. Two larger Neolithic settlements do not fit this village pattern. One was found at Çatal Hüyük, in a fertile agricultural region about 150 miles south of Ankara, the capi- tal of present-day Turkey. This was a large town covering over 15 acres, Wondjina. An image depicting cloud and rain spirits from Chamberlain with a population probably well over Gorge in western Australia, painted perhaps 12,000 years ago. 6,000 people. The houses were clus- Read the Document tered so closely that they had no Redefining Self—From Tribe to Village to City 1500 B.C.E. doors but were entered by ladders Greek, “new stone”). Productive animals, such as sheep and at MyHistoryLab.com from the roofs. goats, and food crops, such as wheat and barley, were first do- Many of these houses were decorated inside with sculp- mesticated in the mountain foothills tures of animal heads and horns, as well as paintings that Read the Document where they already lived or grew in the were apparently redone regularly. Some appear to depict rit- The Toolmaker (3300 B.C.E.) at MyHistoryLab.com wild. ual or festive occasions involving men and women. One is the
  7. 7. CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp 8/12/10 3:57 PM Page 7 Chapter 1 The Birth of Civilization 7 When animals and plants were do- mesticated and brought to the river valleys, the relationship between human beings and nature was changed forever. People had learned to control nature, a vital prerequisite for the emergence of civilization. But farmers had to work harder and longer than hunters did, and they had to stay in one place. Herders, on the other hand, often moved from place to place in search of pasture and water, returning to their villages in the spring. Some scholars refer to the dramatic changes in subsis- tence, settlement, technology, and population of this time as the Neolithic Revolution. The earli- est Neolithic societies appeared in the Middle East about 8000 B.C.E., in China about 4000 B.C.E., and in Çatal Hüyük. The diagram reconstructs part of Çatal Hüyük on the basis of India about 3600 B.C.E. Neolithic archaeological findings. Reprinted by permission of the Catalhoyuk Research Project. agriculture was based on wheat and barley in the Middle East, on millet and rice in China, and on corn in Mesoamer- ica, several millennia later. world’s oldest landscape picture, showing a nearby volcano ex- ploding. The agriculture, arts, and crafts of this town were as- tonishingly diversified and at a much higher level of attain- The Bronze Age and the Birth of Civilization ment than in other, smaller settlements of the period. The site Neolithic agricultural villages and herding cultures gradually of Jericho, an oasis around a spring near the Dead Sea, was replaced Paleolithic culture in much of the world. Then an- occupied as early as 12,000 B.C.E. Around 8000 B.C.E. a town other major shift occurred, first in the plains along the Tigris of 8 to 10 acres grew up, surrounded by a massive stone wall and Euphrates rivers in the region the Greeks and Romans with at least one tower against the inner face. Although this called Mesopotamia (modern Iraq), later in the valley of wall may have been for defense, scholars dispute its use be- the Nile River in Egypt, and somewhat later in India and the cause no other Neolithic settlement has been found with Yellow River basin in China. This shift was initially associ- fortifications. The inhabitants of Neolithic Jericho had a ated with the growth of towns alongside villages, creating a mixed agricultural, herding, and hunting economy and may hierarchy of larger and smaller settlements in the same re- have traded salt. They had no pottery but plastered the skulls gion. Some towns then grew into much larger urban centers of their dead to make realistic memorial portraits of them. and often drew populations into them, so that nearby vil- These two sites show that the economy and the settlement lages and towns declined. The urban centers, or cities, usually patterns of the Neolithic period may be more complicated had monumental buildings, such as temples and fortifica- than many scholars have thought. tions. These were vastly larger than individual houses and Throughout the Paleolithic Age, the human population could be built only by the sustained effort of hundreds and had been small and relatively stable. The shift from food even thousands of people over many years. Elaborate repre- gathering to food production may not have been associated sentational artwork appeared, sometimes made of rare and with an immediate change in population, but over time in imported materials. New technologies, such as smelting and the regions where agriculture and animal husbandry ap- the manufacture of metal tools and weapons, were charac- peared, the number of human beings grew at an unprece- teristic of urban life. Commodities like pottery and textiles dented rate. One reason for this is that farmers usually had that had been made in individual houses in villages were larger families than hunters. Their children began to work mass produced in cities, which also were characterized by and matured at a younger age than the children of hunters. social stratification—that is, different classes of people
  8. 8. CRAIMC01_001-039hr.qxp 8/12/10 3:57 PM Page 8 8 Part 1 Human Origins and Early Civilizations to 500 B.C.E. based on factors such as control of resources, family, reli- eventually, man-made canal systems. Thus, control of water gious or political authority, and personal wealth. The earliest could be important in warfare; an enemy could cut off water writing is also associated with the growth of cities. Writing, upstream of a city to force it to submit. Because the like representational art, was a powerful means of commu- Mesopotamian plain was flat, branches of the rivers often nicating over space and time and was probably invented to changed their courses, and people would have to abandon deal with urban problems of management and record keep- their cities and move to new locations. Archaeologists once ing. These attributes—urbanism; technological, industrial, believed that urban life and centralized government arose in and social change; long-distance trade; and new methods of response to the need to regulate irrigation. This theory sup- symbolic communication—are defining characteristics of posed that only a strong central authority could construct the form of human culture called civilization. At about the and maintain the necessary waterworks. More recently, ar- time the earliest civilizations were emerging, someone dis- chaeologists have shown that large-scale irrigation appeared covered how to combine tin and copper to make a stronger only long after urban civilization had already developed, so and more useful material—bronze. Archaeologists coined major waterworks were a consequence of urbanism, not a the term Bronze Age to refer to the period 3100–1200 cause of it. B.C.E. in the Near East and eastern Mediterranean. Mesopotamian Civilization Early Civilizations in the Middle East to The first civilization appears to have arisen in About 1000 B.C.E. Mesopotamia. The region is divided into two ecological zones, roughly north and south of modern Baghdad. In the Watch the Video By 4000 B.C.E., people had settled in south (Babylonia), as noted, irrigation is vital; in the north large numbers in the river-watered Geography and Civilization: Egypt (Assyria), agriculture is possible with rainfall and wells. and Mesopotamia–Impact of Agriculture? lowlands of Mesopotamia and Egypt. The south has high yields from irrigated lands, while the at MyHistoryLab.com By about 3000 B.C.E., when the inven- north has lower yields, but much more land under cultiva- tion of writing gave birth to history, tion, so it can produce more than the south. The oldest urban life and the organization of society into centralized Mesopotamian cities seem to have been founded by a peo- states were well established in the valleys of the Tigris and Eu- ple called the Sumerians during the fourth millennium phrates rivers in Mesopotamia and the Nile River in Egypt. B.C.E. in the land of Sumer, which is the southern half of Much of the urban population consists of people who Babylonia. By 3000 B.C.E., the Sumerian city of Uruk was do not grow their own food, so urban life is possible only the largest city in the world (see Map 1–2). From about where farmers and stockbreeders can be made to produce 2800 to 2370 B.C.E., in what is called the Early Dynastic a substantial surplus beyond their own needs. Also, some period, several Sumerian city-states existed in southern process has to be in place so that this surplus can be col- Mesopotamia, arranged in north–south lines along the lected and redeployed to sustain city dwellers. Moreover, major watercourses. Among these cities were Uruk, Ur, efficient farming of plains alongside rivers requires intel- Nippur, Shuruppak, and Lagash. Some of the city-states ligent management of water resources for irrigation. In formed leagues among themselves that apparently had Mesopotamia, irrigation was essential because in the both political and religious significance. Quarrels over south (Babylonia), rainfall was insufficient to sustain water and agricultural land led to incessant warfare, and in crops. Furthermore, the rivers, fed by melting snows in time, stronger towns and leagues conquered weaker ones Armenia, rose to flood the fields in the spring, about the and expanded to form kingdoms ruling several city-states. time for harvest, when water was not needed. When water Unlike the Sumerians, the people who occupied was needed for the autumn planting, less was available. northern Mesopotamia and Syria spoke mostly Semitic This meant that people had to build dikes to keep the languages (that is, languages in the same family as Arabic rivers from flooding the fields in the spring and had to de- and Hebrew). The Sumerian language is not related to any vise means to store water for use in the autumn. The language known today. Many of these Semitic peoples ab- Mesopotamians became skilled at that activity early on. In sorbed aspects of Sumerian culture, especially writing. In Egypt, on the other hand, the Nile River flooded at the northern Babylonia, the Mesopotamians believed that the right moment for cultivation, so irrigation was simply a large city of Kish had history’s first kings. In the far east of matter of directing the water to the this territory, not far from modern Baghdad, a people Read the Document fields. In Mesopotamia, villages, known as the Akkadians established their own kingdom at Two Accounts of an Egyptian towns, and cities tended to be strung a capital city called Akkade, under their first king, Sargon, Famine 2600s B.C.E. at MyHistoryLab.com along natural watercourses and, who had been a servant of the king of Kish.

×