Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Classroom-Based
Research EVO 2016
Asli Lidice Gokturk
Saglam &
Kenan Dikilitas
DATA COLLECTION TOOLS FOR
RESEARCH
Data entails the
kinds of
information
researchers obtain
on the subjects of
their research
WHAT COUNTS AS DATA?
Can the f...
Learners’ scores from a test?
Essays written by students?
Anecdodal records?
Teacher diaries?
Jokes and laughter?
WHA...
CAN PHOTOGRAPHS BE USED AS DATA?
HOW ABOUT PARTICIPANTS’ POSTS (TWITTER,
FACEBOOK, GOOGLE+, BLOGS...ETC)?
What are data?
Key questions to consider for data collection
Examples of data collection tools
Further considerations ...
 1. Where will the data be collected? In a classroom? Online?
 2. When will it be collected?
 3. How often are the data...
How much data should be collected?
EXAMPLES OF DATA COLECTION INSTRUMENTS
Photo credit: http://www.wikihow.com/Do-Qualitative-Research
 Likert scale questionnaires
 choosing a response on a continuum
 easy to use with large numbers of participants
 offe...
Numbers may not help you understand the whole picture of your research
focus, so there is need for collecting data that wi...
 Check if they are really testing what you want‚ and then revise items in the
questionnaire through trialing
 Provide co...
a Likert-scale
I believe reading outside the
classroom
1 2 3 4 5
improves my vocabulary knowledge
Develops my reading pace...
Open-ended Both closed-ended and open-ended
OPEN-ENDED& MIX-MATCH 
How do you feel about reading outside the
classroom?
D...
DEMOGRAPHIC DATA
Direct Observation
every aspect of a specific
practice/activity
 students’ reactions in a particular
lesson
 teachers’ ...
LIMITATIONS OF OBSERVATION
•Very time consuming
•feeling obliged to teach in the way
expected by the observer rather than
...
DOCUMENTATION
Documents and artifacts from
teaching
lesson plans
teaching materials
student work
REPORTS AND INTROSPECT...
 “insider” perspective on what is being done and why.
 access to information generated over a long period
 possibility ...
Investigating students’
insider perspectives on what
they do and especially why
they do the things they do
Individuals o...
Please check the potential
interview questions as to
whether they are leading the
interviewee or not?
1. How did the less...
Journals or diaries kept by
students may yield a deep
and quality data set on their
personal perspectives
toward the issu...
 an effective way of accessing students’ beliefs and learning practices
 these can be helpful for your instructional dec...
 This type of data collection allows us to have a set of data about the actual process of doing
something, what students ...
 The risk of abusing students for taking their time and energy for something they do
not want to contribute
 They may no...
 EP encourages classroom researchers to colelct data in such a way that they are co -
working with the people from whom t...
POTENTIALLY EXPLOITABLE PEDAGOGIC ACTIVITIES
(PEPAS)
Verbal data Written data Data from Task Data from Activity & Exercise...
• Do data collection tools allow inference of valid
conclusions?Validity
• Do they give consistent results?Reliability
• H...
RESEARCH ETHICS
  Classroom-Based Research EVO 2016 Week 3: "Data collection tools for research" by Kenan Dikilitas & Asli Lidice Gokturk ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Classroom-Based Research EVO 2016 Week 3: "Data collection tools for research" by Kenan Dikilitas & Asli Lidice Gokturk Saglam

1,063 views

Published on


This is WEEk 3 Live event of Classroom-Based Research EVO 2016. "Data collection tools for research" were explored by Kenan Dikilitas & Asli Lidice Gokturk Saglam

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Classroom-Based Research EVO 2016 Week 3: "Data collection tools for research" by Kenan Dikilitas & Asli Lidice Gokturk Saglam

  1. 1. Classroom-Based Research EVO 2016 Asli Lidice Gokturk Saglam & Kenan Dikilitas DATA COLLECTION TOOLS FOR RESEARCH
  2. 2. Data entails the kinds of information researchers obtain on the subjects of their research WHAT COUNTS AS DATA? Can the following be used as «data»? Please type your response in the chat box
  3. 3. Learners’ scores from a test? Essays written by students? Anecdodal records? Teacher diaries? Jokes and laughter? WHAT COUNTS AS DATA?
  4. 4. CAN PHOTOGRAPHS BE USED AS DATA?
  5. 5. HOW ABOUT PARTICIPANTS’ POSTS (TWITTER, FACEBOOK, GOOGLE+, BLOGS...ETC)?
  6. 6. What are data? Key questions to consider for data collection Examples of data collection tools Further considerations for the researcher Research Ethics FLOW OF THE SESSION
  7. 7.  1. Where will the data be collected? In a classroom? Online?  2. When will it be collected?  3. How often are the data to be collected?  4. Who will collect the data? KEY QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER FOR DATA COLLECTION Selection or design of research tools The conditions under which they will be adminstered instrumentation
  8. 8. How much data should be collected?
  9. 9. EXAMPLES OF DATA COLECTION INSTRUMENTS Photo credit: http://www.wikihow.com/Do-Qualitative-Research
  10. 10.  Likert scale questionnaires  choosing a response on a continuum  easy to use with large numbers of participants  offer clear‚ numerical data which is easy to analyze  checklist questionnaires  checking their actions they do  open-ended questionnaires  writing answers to specific open-ended questions QUESTIONNAIRES Questionnaires should be complemented with data from other sources through different tools through triangulation to increase the integrity of the conclusions drawn
  11. 11. Numbers may not help you understand the whole picture of your research focus, so there is need for collecting data that will help you look into the issue from a qualitative perspective as well.  uses multiple sources of data to increase research credibility (Davis‚ 1995; Denzin & Lincoln‚ 1994)  chooses data collection instruments from a variety of these four categories  provides different aspects of the research focus  gives a more comprehensive picture of the issue under investigation  single or similar sets of data can lead research to misrepresentative conclusions WHY TRIANGULATE DATA?
  12. 12.  Check if they are really testing what you want‚ and then revise items in the questionnaire through trialing  Provide consistency in the questionnaire statements in terms of the coherence  All questions should be eliciting information in the same directions such positive, or negative. However, some questions can be asked negatively and reverse coded when analyzed SELECTION OR CONSTRUCTION OF A QUESTIONNAIRE
  13. 13. a Likert-scale I believe reading outside the classroom 1 2 3 4 5 improves my vocabulary knowledge Develops my reading pace Fosters my comprehension Helps me learn about English texts Checklist DIFFERENT TYPES OF ITEMS ON A QUESTIONNAIRE
  14. 14. Open-ended Both closed-ended and open-ended OPEN-ENDED& MIX-MATCH  How do you feel about reading outside the classroom? Do you think it can develop your reading skills? In what ways? Learning vocabulary in context is easy/challenging 1.2.3.4.5 because _____________________________________
  15. 15. DEMOGRAPHIC DATA
  16. 16. Direct Observation every aspect of a specific practice/activity  students’ reactions in a particular lesson  teachers’ classroom management etc. Observing can be supported by  informal talk with colleagues on ______________________________  informal talk with students on ______________________________  structured follow up interview on ______________________________ Indirect observation  tape classes and then analyze the transcripts  having the lesson observed by a co-researcher who has not been their teacher  ______________________________ OBSERVATION Activity: If you use observation as a data collection tool, please choose and complete the following:
  17. 17. LIMITATIONS OF OBSERVATION •Very time consuming •feeling obliged to teach in the way expected by the observer rather than teach the way they would normally do •There are unobservable things such as how students or teachers feel about an issue
  18. 18. DOCUMENTATION Documents and artifacts from teaching lesson plans teaching materials student work REPORTS AND INTROSPECTION Students’ report on what they do why they do it what they believe what they are or were thinking DOCUMENTATION, REPORTS AND INTROSPECTION
  19. 19.  “insider” perspective on what is being done and why.  access to information generated over a long period  possibility to undertand personal perspectives KEY CHARACTERISTICS OF REPORTS AND INTROSPECTION Bear in mind: the participants’ verbal reports highlight estimation of their thoughts, not what they exactly think
  20. 20. Investigating students’ insider perspectives on what they do and especially why they do the things they do Individuals or focus groups Focus on specific questions DISADVANTAGES: takes a lot of time to conduct‚ transcribe and analyze limits the number of participants who can be interviewed INTERVIEWS Questions should be clear and unambiguous, concise and to the point & should not lead the interviewee to convey a particular thought
  21. 21. Please check the potential interview questions as to whether they are leading the interviewee or not? 1. How did the lesson improve your reding skills? 2. Did you like the activity? 3. How do you feel about the task you did? 4. What made the task difficult? INTERVIEWS
  22. 22. Journals or diaries kept by students may yield a deep and quality data set on their personal perspectives toward the issue being researched They provide researchers a detailed set of data, but hard to find such students to systematically write Need for follow-up interviews to clarify unclear points JOURNALS
  23. 23.  an effective way of accessing students’ beliefs and learning practices  these can be helpful for your instructional decisions; knowing about why they learn in a particular way  stories of experiences  Can you share with me how you feel when you speak in the classroom?  general stories  Can you tell us how you learnt grammar in secondary school?  specific aspects of teaching  Can you share with me what you do to learn your vocabulary knowledge? NARRATIVE AND BIOGRAPHIC METHODS
  24. 24.  This type of data collection allows us to have a set of data about the actual process of doing something, what students or teachers do it in particular way and why.  Teachers or students need to talk about what they are doing at the time of the engagement. For example,  Videotape while you  perform a task  teach a lesson  mark a paper  consult with a student  do homework  write an essay  do listening  Then watch the video with your students and ask what they think, why they behave in a particular way STIMULATED RECALL
  25. 25.  The risk of abusing students for taking their time and energy for something they do not want to contribute  They may not be gaining any benefits while contributing to your research  The data they will provide may be lacking reliability on account of this  Your students should be part of the data collection as co-researchers  Therefore, we need to develop an alternative way AN ALTERNATIVE WAY FOR COLLECTING QUALITATIVE DATA
  26. 26.  EP encourages classroom researchers to colelct data in such a way that they are co - working with the people from whom the data is collected.  Therefore, it encourages to generate Potentially Exploitable Pedagogic Activities (PEPAs)  integrated into the normal pedagogic activities that a teacher normally do.  aims to benefit students rather than only absuing them as a source of information  students develop their language skills while they are providing you with data  students become integral part of your research, which creates a classroom where teachers and students work together to understand an issue (See Alwright and Hanks, 2009) EXPLORATORY PRACTICE (EP)
  27. 27. POTENTIALLY EXPLOITABLE PEDAGOGIC ACTIVITIES (PEPAS) Verbal data Written data Data from Task Data from Activity & Exercise Pair-work Diaries Games Tests Group-work Self-evaluation Projects True & False exercises Role-play Suggestion box Field trips Jigsaw reading Consultancy Problem box Vlogs Sentence completion Discussion Dialogue journal writing Blogging Gap-filling sentences Interviews Learner-to-learner correspondence Self-recording Reading texts about the puzzle Storytelling Story completion Video-taping Brainstorming Writing critical incidents Drawing Self-evaluation Peer feedback
  28. 28. • Do data collection tools allow inference of valid conclusions?Validity • Do they give consistent results?Reliability • How easy to use data collection tools? How long? • Instructions clear? How easy to score? How to interpret?Usability Objectivity FURTHER CONSIDERATIONS FOR A RESEARCHER
  29. 29. RESEARCH ETHICS

×