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by Clara Ariski Paramitha
Abstract
In this paper the author would like to analyze “Overtones” by Alice
Gerstenberg. The purpose is to analyze the ch...
Introduction
The writer uses Alice Gerstenberg
Overtones to be analyzed because the
character gives us an insight of the J...
Theory and Methodology
Character
(1970:84) “It is a brief descripive sketch of a Personage who typifies
some definite qual...
Theory and Methodology
Anima/animus
(1970:135) “...the anima is fickle, capricious, moody,
uncontrolled and emotional, som...
Theory and Methodology
We will find out the playwright’s objective in writing
the play from intrinsics and extrinsics elem...
Reseach Object
The objects of research are sorted into a
material and formal object. Material object
in this study is shor...
Biography of Alice Gerstenberg
Alice Gerstenberg (1885-1972) was
educated at Kirkland School and then spent her
college ye...
Play’s Summary
Harriet is preparing for Mrs. Margaret Caldwell, whom she has invited to
tea. She have her primitive "inner...
Overtones
Discussion
Shadow
Based on Jungian archetypes, shadow is the negative side that is repressed. In this play,
Hetty’s opinio...
Discussion
Persona
Harriet and Hetty as one character shows that Harriet taking the place for the
persona or the conscious...
Discussion
Animus
The male impulses are shared between Harriet and Hetty.
Harried has the logical thinking and Hetty has t...
Discussion
Animus
HARRIET: [beginning to feel the strength of HETTY'S emotion surge through her and
trying to conquer it] ...
Conclusion
“Overtones” a play by Alice Gerstenberg depicts
Jungian major archetypes which are shadow, persona,
animus and ...
References
http://www.bookrags.com/studyguide-
overtones/bio.html#gsc.tab=0 (15 May 2016)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=...
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The archetypes of characters in alice gerstenberg

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The purpose is to analyze the characters in the play. Theories that used are textual, contextual, and hypertextual by close viewing method. The writer contends that the characters in this play have archetypes which are shadow, persona, anima/animus, and self. In conclusion, there are different archetypes that can be found in the characters of this play.

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The archetypes of characters in alice gerstenberg

  1. 1. by Clara Ariski Paramitha
  2. 2. Abstract In this paper the author would like to analyze “Overtones” by Alice Gerstenberg. The purpose is to analyze the characters in the play. Theories that used are textual, contextual, and hypertextual by close viewing method. The writer contends that the characters in this play have archetypes which are shadow, persona, anima/animus, and self. In conclusion, there are different archetypes that can be found in the characters of this play. Keywords: Shadow, Persona, Anima/Animus, Self
  3. 3. Introduction The writer uses Alice Gerstenberg Overtones to be analyzed because the character gives us an insight of the Jungian theory influence that began to grow in that era. Alice Gerstenberg's Overtones is the earliest play that implement the unconscious theory. She uses two person, one as the conscious and the other is unconscious to represents single character. The unconscious become primitive side and the conscious become refined side.
  4. 4. Theory and Methodology Character (1970:84) “It is a brief descripive sketch of a Personage who typifies some definite quality. The person is described not as an individualized personality but as an example of some vice or virtue or type”. Shadow (1970:184) “The symbols of the self arise in the depths of the body and they express its materiality every bit as much as the structure of the perceiving consciousness”. Persona (1970:31) “... the face we never show to the world because we cover it with the persona, the mask of the actor. But the mirror lies behind the mask and shows the true face.”
  5. 5. Theory and Methodology Anima/animus (1970:135) “...the anima is fickle, capricious, moody, uncontrolled and emotional, sometimes gifted with daemonic intuitions, ruthless, malicious, untruthful, bitchy, double-faced, and mystical. The animus is obstinate, harping on principles, laying down the law, dogmatic, world-reforming, theoretic, word-mongering, argumentative, and domineering”. Self (1970:182) “The self, regarded as the counter-pole of the world, its "absolutely other," is the sine qua non of all empirical knowledge and consciousness of subject and object”.
  6. 6. Theory and Methodology We will find out the playwright’s objective in writing the play from intrinsics and extrinsics elements that used with steps that are undertaken methodically. 1. Analyzing the short film by close viewing the play Overtones. 2. Analyzing the character in the play. 3. Analyzing archetypes of characters.
  7. 7. Reseach Object The objects of research are sorted into a material and formal object. Material object in this study is short film Overtones by Alice Gerstenberg. Formal object of this research is the archetypes of characters.
  8. 8. Biography of Alice Gerstenberg Alice Gerstenberg (1885-1972) was educated at Kirkland School and then spent her college years in Bryn Mawr, while she began writing plays and performing in college theatrical productions. Her teacher, Morgan, encouraged Gerstenberg to write some one-act plays and the four resulting plays were published later that year in a volume entitled A Little World. Gerstenberg continued her writing career and had some moderate success in 1912. In 1921 she co-founded the Chicago Junior League Theater, a group that sponsored plays for children, and in 1922 she founded the Playwright's Theater, a group dedicated to providing opportunities for local artists to develop and present their work. She ran the Playwright's Theater until 1945. In 1938 she received the Chicago Foundation for Literature Award.
  9. 9. Play’s Summary Harriet is preparing for Mrs. Margaret Caldwell, whom she has invited to tea. She have her primitive "inner self," Hetty, to converse with. Harriet and Hetty acknowledge that they are very different parts of the same person, though Harriet refuses to admit that Hetty is also the wife of Charles Goodrich. Harriet insist that she alone is Charles's wife because it is she who manipulates him through her personality. The conversation turns to the past’s dilema, Hetty's upset because she had not having married John Caldwell when she had the opportunity. Harriet reminds her that John has an uncertain future because of his desire to be a painter. Hetty then begins to coach Harriet on what she must say and do when John's wife Margaret arrives.
  10. 10. Overtones
  11. 11. Discussion Shadow Based on Jungian archetypes, shadow is the negative side that is repressed. In this play, Hetty’s opinion and need have never been materialized into life. HETTY: I hate her. Hetty stated that she hates Margaret, yet Harriet never expressed that feeling verbally. HETTY: [in anguish]. Don't call me happy. I've never been happy since I gave up John. All these years without him -- a future without him -- no -- no -- I shall win him back -- away from you -- away from you – Hetty clearly admits that she have never been happy since her failure in marrying John, this dissapoinment never been acknowledged by Harriet and deflected with her logical reason that John is economically unstable as a painter and she is well off with her current husband.
  12. 12. Discussion Persona Harriet and Hetty as one character shows that Harriet taking the place for the persona or the conscious self, image of them that depicted into the world after filtered by Harriet. HARRIET: I can't let her see that. After Hetty stated that she hates Maggie, Harriet decides that she can not show that feeling, this means she tries to maintain her image, in consideration that she will be seen as spiteful person if she relayed what Hetty said. Harriet is trying to be the society wants her to be and hides her dilema.
  13. 13. Discussion Animus The male impulses are shared between Harriet and Hetty. Harried has the logical thinking and Hetty has the animalistic, aggresive, and dominating impulses. HARRIET: I resent your appropriation of a man who is managed only through the cleverness of my artifice. It is clear that Harriet become the decision maker for character that they will depict in the world. She is maintaining Hetty’s rash and emotional judgement with her sensible reason.
  14. 14. Discussion Animus HARRIET: [beginning to feel the strength of HETTY'S emotion surge through her and trying to conquer it] It is not my business to have heartaches. When Hetty has the dominating side, Harriet become the complement, the submissive. In some lines and in her expression, she is afraid of Hetty, admitting that she is overwhelmed with Hetty’s presence, yet she can not fight or get away. HETTY: Are you going to quarrel with me? HETTY: [towering over HARRIET] He isn't! I'll kill you! As mentioned above, Hetty is aggresive and dominating. In this play, she gives advice for Harriet constantly and shows her tendency to dominate.
  15. 15. Conclusion “Overtones” a play by Alice Gerstenberg depicts Jungian major archetypes which are shadow, persona, animus and self. Those archetypes are the foundation of the human psyche, so the play becomes relatable to the audience. The characters in this play successfully get in touch with their shadow and animus by acknowledging its existence in order to get in touch with the Self.
  16. 16. References http://www.bookrags.com/studyguide- overtones/bio.html#gsc.tab=0 (15 May 2016) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9F3FHBsdsNA (15 May 2016) http://www.sigmundfreud.net/the-ego-and-the-id-pdf-ebook.jsp (15 May 2016) http://www2.anglistik.uni- freiburg.de/intranet/englishbasics/PDF/Drama.pdf (15 May 2016) http://www.woodsidehs.org/uploadedFiles/file_1937.pdf (15 May 2016) http://changingminds.org/explanations/identity/jung_archetypes.h tm#sha Jung, C. G. 1970. The Collected Works Of C. G. Jung. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

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