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Using Weblogs as  Project Management Tools,  Sounding Boards, or  Everyday Journals Clancy Ratliff Department of Rhetoric ...
Overview <ul><li>Definition of Weblog </li></ul><ul><li>If You Write It, They Will Come (Not!): Networking, Linking, Enter...
What Is a Weblog? <ul><li>A frequently updated web site consisting of dated entries in reverse chronological order </li></...
If You Write It, They Will Come (Not!): Networking, Linking, Entering a Conversation <ul><li>You have to promote your webl...
Who Reads This Thing? Knowing Your Audience <ul><li>How do you find out who’s reading your weblog? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>G...
Uses of Weblogs: Project Management <ul><li>Make notes about projects you’re working on </li></ul><ul><li>Make notes about...
Uses of Weblogs: Citizen Journalism <ul><li>Report on city council meetings, court cases </li></ul><ul><li>Cover local and...
Uses of Weblogs: Personal Journaling <ul><li>Childhood memories </li></ul><ul><li>Online baby book </li></ul><ul><li>Movie...
Legal and Ethical Considerations Related to Blogging <ul><li>Defamation </li></ul><ul><li>Intellectual Property (Copyright...
Publication of Private Facts <ul><li>“ Some jurisdictions allow lawsuits for the publication of private facts. In Californ...
Remember… <ul><li>Anyone and everyone can read your weblog unless it’s password-protected! Don’t publish anything on your ...
Weblog Ethics <ul><li>Publish as fact only that which you believe to be true. </li></ul><ul><li>If material exists online,...
Still Want to Do It? <ul><li>Find a newspaper story online -- startribune.com, minnesotapublicradio.org, nytimes.com, etc....
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Introduction to Blogging presentation for a continuing ed class

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Introduction to Blogging presentation for a continuing ed class

  1. 1. Using Weblogs as Project Management Tools, Sounding Boards, or Everyday Journals Clancy Ratliff Department of Rhetoric University of Minnesota
  2. 2. Overview <ul><li>Definition of Weblog </li></ul><ul><li>If You Write It, They Will Come (Not!): Networking, Linking, Entering a Conversation </li></ul><ul><li>Who Reads This Thing? Knowing Your Audience </li></ul><ul><li>Uses of Weblogs: Project Management, Knowledge Management, Citizen Journalism, Personal Journaling </li></ul><ul><li>Legal and Ethical Considerations Related to Blogging </li></ul><ul><li>Activity </li></ul>
  3. 3. What Is a Weblog? <ul><li>A frequently updated web site consisting of dated entries in reverse chronological order </li></ul><ul><li>“ The unedited voice of an individual” -- Dave Winer </li></ul><ul><li>Anatomy of a weblog </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Posts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Comments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blogroll </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. If You Write It, They Will Come (Not!): Networking, Linking, Entering a Conversation <ul><li>You have to promote your weblog if you expect anyone to read it </li></ul><ul><li>Find other people’s weblogs by doing searches in Google Blog Search and Technorati; when you find one weblog, go to that person’s blogroll and click around </li></ul><ul><li>Leave comments on other people’s weblog posts </li></ul><ul><li>Link to other people’s weblogs (they’ll see you in their http referrers) </li></ul>
  5. 5. Who Reads This Thing? Knowing Your Audience <ul><li>How do you find out who’s reading your weblog? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Get your reader statistics (Sitemeter) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Search for your weblog on Technorati </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Put an email address on your weblog; make it easy to find (so readers can contact you!) </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Uses of Weblogs: Project Management <ul><li>Make notes about projects you’re working on </li></ul><ul><li>Make notes about the texts you’re reading (especially if they’re online!) </li></ul><ul><li>Use a weblog as a centralized location for you and your team to communicate -- everything’s in one place, unlike 1000 email messages </li></ul><ul><li>Upload and discuss images, charts, graphs, drafts </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t worry about having your ideas stolen </li></ul>
  7. 7. Uses of Weblogs: Citizen Journalism <ul><li>Report on city council meetings, court cases </li></ul><ul><li>Cover local and national issues </li></ul>
  8. 8. Uses of Weblogs: Personal Journaling <ul><li>Childhood memories </li></ul><ul><li>Online baby book </li></ul><ul><li>Movie/book reviews </li></ul><ul><li>Creative work (poetry, fiction, photography) </li></ul><ul><li>Daily activities </li></ul><ul><li>Personal thoughts, dreams, fears </li></ul><ul><li>Personal struggles (weight loss, addiction, disease) </li></ul>
  9. 9. Legal and Ethical Considerations Related to Blogging <ul><li>Defamation </li></ul><ul><li>Intellectual Property (Copyright/Trademark) </li></ul><ul><li>Trade Secret </li></ul><ul><li>Right of Publicity </li></ul><ul><li>Publication of Private Facts </li></ul><ul><li>Intrusion into Seclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Shield Laws (March 2005 case, Apple corporation) </li></ul><ul><li>(Source: Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Legal Guide for Bloggers, available at http://www.eff.org/bloggers/lg/) </li></ul>
  10. 10. Publication of Private Facts <ul><li>“ Some jurisdictions allow lawsuits for the publication of private facts. In California, for example, the elements are (1) public disclosure; (2) of a private fact; (3) that is offensive to a reasonable person; and (4) which is not a legitimate matter of public concern. Publication on a blog would generally be considered public disclosure. However, if a private fact is deemed ‘newsworthy,’ it may be legal to print it even if it might be considered ‘offensive to a reasonable person.’” </li></ul><ul><li>If the private facts are newsworthy, though, it’s legal. </li></ul><ul><li>(Source: Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Legal Guide for Bloggers, available at http://www.eff.org/bloggers/lg/) </li></ul>
  11. 11. Remember… <ul><li>Anyone and everyone can read your weblog unless it’s password-protected! Don’t publish anything on your weblog that you wouldn’t want published on the front page of your local newspaper, especially if you blog under your real name. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Weblog Ethics <ul><li>Publish as fact only that which you believe to be true. </li></ul><ul><li>If material exists online, link to it when you reference it. </li></ul><ul><li>Publicly correct any misinformation. </li></ul><ul><li>Write each entry as if it could not be changed; add to, but do not rewrite or delete, any entry. </li></ul><ul><li>Disclose any conflict of interest. </li></ul><ul><li>Note questionable and biased sources. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: Rebecca Blood, “Weblog Ethics,” available at http://www.rebeccablood.net/handbook/excerpts/weblog_ethics.html </li></ul>
  13. 13. Still Want to Do It? <ul><li>Find a newspaper story online -- startribune.com, minnesotapublicradio.org, nytimes.com, etc., and write a response to it. Be sure to link to the story. </li></ul><ul><li>Write a post about your most memorable Valentine’s Day. </li></ul><ul><li>Write a post that describes your thoughts about blogging in general, what you think you’ll use it for, and/or what decision you’ll make about anonymity and why. </li></ul><ul><li>Or write about a different topic, whatever you want! It’s your blog; why let me tell you what to write about? :) </li></ul>

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