Lee county sdat presentation final

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Lee county sdat presentation final

  1. 1. Lee County SDAT October 2013
  2. 2. THE VISION “A Livable, Economically Diverse Hub for Sustainable Business” Our Charge •Assess the feasibility of the Diamond Concept •How and what it should be • What the public and private sectors can do to make it happen
  3. 3. 3 3
  4. 4. What We Heard What We Heard 7 7
  5. 5. • What does the Diamond boundary mean? • How can we be competitive nationally? • We want to diversify the economy through innovative research and sustainable industries • Is this a marketing exercise? 8
  6. 6. • Skyplex adjacency to the airport is a competitive advantage. • Potential synergy with the University. • Some DRGR and lands bordering on mines poses challenge for development.
  7. 7. • Effective public-private partnerships are essential. • A concern planning won’t bear fruit • People need to be patient. It will take time to achieve the vision. • We don’t want “more of the same”
  8. 8. WE HEARD YOU WANT • A complete community to attract families • Walkable, comfortable setting with Transportation Choices • Attract and retain FGCU faculty and students • Distinctive architecture and landscape • Cool things to do
  9. 9. 13 13
  10. 10. 14 14
  11. 11. 1. When Work Changes, the City is Transformed
  12. 12. When major change happened: Agriculture & Crafts to Factories – “Industrialization v.1” The prosperity machine of early industrialization grew cities and towns to a never-before-seen scale © Freedman Tung + Sasaki 2013
  13. 13. Industrialization v.2: City Pattern re-organized using Industrial Principles Business park Shopping Center “City as Machine” (CIAM 1933) • • • • Economy Focused on Making & Moving Goods Synchronized routines Segregated land uses linked by vehicle “conveyor belts” Mass consumption © Freedman Tung + Sasaki 2013 Housing Subdivision
  14. 14. Industrialization v.2: The Mid-20th Century Suburban Ideal • When the nature of Work changes, the City is entirely transformed • (The Business Park was ushered in by a small group of business leaders) © Freedman Tung + Sasaki 2012
  15. 15. New Technologies: • Cars • Interstate Highways • Electrification • Air Conditioning The Experiment FIT with the new industrial economy of the Era. Taylorism (Fordism): • Central Control • Mass Production • Mass Consumption Demographics: • Uniform H/H Structure Cheap energy Abundant accessible land Massive subsidies © Freedman Tung + Sasaki 2013 It became our culture’s development “consensus” on how to build.
  16. 16. Foundations of the Recent “Consensus” 1950 - 2007 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. The Open Road Demographics – uniform household structure Cheap energy Abundant, available and accessible land Massive government subsidies - home mortgages, strip construction, highway construction & maintenance 6. Fordist model of national economic development – based on consuming homes, cars, and home appliances. 7. Nostalgia - New generations of Americans learned to associate sprawl with America
  17. 17. Foundations of the Emerging Consensus 2008 - ? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. The Open Road Demographics – uniform household structure Cheap energy Abundant, available and accessible land Massive government subsidies - home mortgages, strip construction, highway construction & maintenance 6. Fordist model of national economic development – based on consuming homes, cars, and home appliances. 7. Nostalgia - New generations of Americans learned to associate sprawl with America
  18. 18. Does the Mid-20th Century “Consensus” and its City format still fit the needs of today’s economic activity?
  19. 19. Beginning in the 1980s: Wide-spread Digitalization © Freedman Tung + Sasaki 2013
  20. 20. At first, many thought it was just a change in tools. But digitalization has led to Fundamental changes in work activity
  21. 21. This process of combining ideas to create new possibilities… + + © Freedman Tung + Sasaki 2013 = =
  22. 22. …is called Innovation and it has become the primary wealthgenerator in the new economy. © Freedman Tung + Sasaki 2013
  23. 23. Saskia Sassen: the heightened importance of rapid creative invention has effected all industries – from mining and agriculture to electronics.
  24. 24. Innovation is a social process Research has shown that innovation comes from: • Group collaboration rather than individual solitary effort. Source: analytics20.org • Interaction between people with different specializations, experiences, and perspectives.
  25. 25. Essential Principal: Innovation is fostered by providing settings that bring people together to collaborate and exchange ideas • In the office and the lab • In the conference room • In cafes, bars and restaurants • During breaks, recreation and leisure • Especially while socializing
  26. 26. We are still designing our cities to meet the needs of the old industrial economy
  27. 27. 2. Reshaping the City
  28. 28. Leading cities (of all sizes) are beginning to understand: To Attract, Build, and Serve the Businesses of Tomorrow, we must Physically re-shape cities to attract and accommodate the needs of innovators
  29. 29. The Innovation Ecosystem: Dense Collaborative Network of Partners, Suppliers, Customers
  30. 30. The Innovation Ecosystem: Composed of Companies at Different Stages in their Life-cycle
  31. 31. Emerging: A Dynamic Mix of Uses (instead of the old habit of separating uses) Offices Hotel Offices Studios Small-medium sized businesses University of Salford & iTV BBC Housing BBC BBC HDTV Entertainment MediaCity – Manchester UK
  32. 32. Emerging: A Range of Building & Workspace Types Mixture of space costs, sizes, and configurations to match the needs of different work activity in close proximity Quality Medium Sized Space Creative rehab – lower cost spaces New lower cost, small scale space Established Corporate Space
  33. 33. The U.S. General Services Administration has embraced these ideas in planning and managing its properties: Source: GSA Public Buildings Service White Paper, Leveraging Mobility, Managing Place (2010)
  34. 34. Reshape the City: Connectivity
  35. 35. Segregated land uses + arterial roadway system – failing as a habitat Forces Undermining the Viability of the “Modernist” City: •Poor Accessibility •Rapid Consumption of Farmland, Natural Resources •Acceleration of Climate Change •Wasteful of Diminishing Fossil Fuel Reserves •Increasingly expensive for families
  36. 36. Emerging: Transit-Connected Hubs of Activity • Multi-Nucleated Patterns of walkable, bikeable, mixed-use, denser development • Integrated with a Transit Network offering modern, frequent service
  37. 37. Reshape the City: Activity
  38. 38. The Workplace District remains out of sync No activity focus or center
  39. 39. Activity-generating retail is one of the most precious city building commodities. Urban vitality drives innovation and attracts “talent.” The most important and most difficult decision in the design of the (suburban) metro area is where (and how) to strategically build the retail.
  40. 40. To foster creativity & innovation cities must provide “Vital Centers” with clustering, density, mix, and settings for interaction Centerless Workplace “Vital Center” Classifying and locating these centers is a critical strategic decision cities must make
  41. 41. ULI Emerging Trends 2011: Commercial real estate needs to cope with “Era of Less” “Most areas need less retail, not more. Endless strip construction is over. …. [we must] rethink how we deliver retail in better transportation-linked urban centers, moving away from car-dependent models”
  42. 42. Reshape the City: Amenity & Image
  43. 43. The Workplace District remains out of sync Plenty of Open Space but no “Public” Space
  44. 44. The Emerging 21st Century Workplace District Model: Settings for Convenience, Interaction, Activity SOMA near South Park, San Francisco
  45. 45. To Attract Innovators: Promote “business livability” – developments and districts that respond to 3 scales of activity: Quick Breaks • Immediately outside the building Lunchtime Activity • Evenly distributed within 3 minute walk; activated by food & drink businesses After Work Activity • © Freedman Tung + Sasaki 2012 A central cluster within 10-15 minute walk, bike, drive or transit ride; activated by restaurants, bars, fitness, convenience retail
  46. 46. Part 3: New Formats of Development in the Innovation Economy
  47. 47. PREVIOUS ERA: Economic Value Created by large corporate firms • • • • • Attracting Talent Training Compensation packages Services Infrastructure/Building Investment
  48. 48. PREVIOUS ERA: Economic Development Tap into the “Big-Firm Ecosystem” by attracting large firms • Transportation access • Infrastructure improvements • Financial incentives (tax incentives, land write-downs, etc.)
  49. 49. Change: The scale & complexity of business operations has increased dramatically Wrigley © Freedman Tung + Sasaki 2012
  50. 50. Change: Work is distributed among a highly connected network of specialized, collaborating partners
  51. 51. To be successful in this transformed economic landscape, Cities need to: 1. Attract and accommodate small and medium sized firms along with large ones. 2. Attract, produce and retain a pool of Knowledge Workers.
  52. 52. CEOs for Cities survey of 25 – 34 year old college graduates: • Almost 64 percent of them reported they pick where they want to live before launching a job search. • They are about 90% more likely to live in close-in urban neighborhoods
  53. 53. The “creative class” craves vital centers Transit Streetlife Public Spaces
  54. 54. Attracting, Building, and Serving the Businesses of Tomorrow requires a new approach to Economic Development Industrial Economy Focus Exclusively on Attracting Big, Vertically Integrated Firms Innovation Economy Physically re-shape cities to attract and accommodate the needs of innovators + Assemble knowledge districts that foster innovation and produce innovators
  55. 55. The emerging “Business District” ecosystem: • City and Regional Centers (Downtowns) • Workplace-focused districts • Revitalized Business Parks • Redeveloped Industrial Districts • Institution-anchored districts • Educational Campuses • Medical Districts © Freedman Tung + Sasaki 2012
  56. 56. Smaller cities and towns are remaking themselves as hubs for the knowledge economy. Livable cities draw creative people, and creative people spawn jobs. Some places you’d never expect—small cities not dominated by a university—are learning how to lure knowledge workers, entrepreneurs, and other imaginative types at levels that track or exceed the US average (30 percent of workers) “Small Cities Feed the Knowledge Economy,” WIRED Magazine – May 31, 2012 61
  57. 57. Build on Local Strengths 1. Studies have shown that up to 80 percent of job growth is from existing businesses 2. In the new era of specialized, networked businesses, proximity matters 3. Focus on strengthening existing workplace districts / industry clusters 4. Target those industries related to existing City assets
  58. 58. • When Work Changes, the City is Transformed • The City will be Reshaped • New Formats of Development in the Innovation Economy
  59. 59. Stability Areas and Change Areas Treeline Blvd I-75 Daniels Pkwy RSW Terminal Acc Rd Alico Rd FGCU LEGEND Stable Area Estero Pkwy Change Area Institutional Area Natural Preserve Co c rks rew Rd
  60. 60. Current Economic Conditions • Very large area to absorb • Glut of vacant space across all commercial and industrial – Low rents, marketwide • Markets rebounding in 2013, but a long ways to go
  61. 61. Two paths • Wait for market trends to develop the area • Go after what you want
  62. 62. Waiting for market trends • Will likely result in – Low density, low cost development patterns – Scattered absorption – Little cohesive identity
  63. 63. Stability Areas and Change Areas Treeline Blvd I-75 Daniels Pkwy RSW Terminal Acc Rd Alico Rd FGCU LEGEND Stable Area Estero Pkwy Change Area Institutional Area Natural Preserve Co c rks rew Rd
  64. 64. Daniels Pkwy I-75 Institutional Treeline Blvd Potential Development Pattern RSW Innovation Cluster Tradeport/Industrial Terminal Acc Rd Commercial Strip Alico Rd Commercial Retail Hospitality & Services Residential FGCU Natural Area Estero Pkwy Entertainment r Co rew ksc Rd
  65. 65. Potential Development Pattern Daniels Pkwy Institutional Treeline Blvd Innovation Cluster Commercial Strip RSW I-75 Tradeport/Industrial Commercial Retail Hospitality & Services Terminal Acc Rd Residential Natural Area Entertainment Alico Rd
  66. 66. Potential Development Pattern Alico Rd I-75 Innovation Cluster Treeline Blvd Institutional Tradeport/Industrial Commercial Strip FGCU Commercial Retail Hospitality & Services Estero Pkwy Residential Natural Area Entertainment rks Co w cre Rd
  67. 67. Daniels Pkwy Potential Development Pattern I-75 Innovation Cluster Treeline Blvd RSW Institutional Tradeport/Industrial Terminal Acc Rd Commercial Strip Commercial Retail Hospitality & Services Alico Rd Residential Natural Area Entertainment
  68. 68. Implementation • Economic Development Approach • Policies • Capital Improvement Projects
  69. 69. Encourage development will require addressing • Innovation • Infrastructure • Quality places • Human capital • • • • through Investment Encouragement Recruitment Focus
  70. 70. Innovation 108
  71. 71. Human Capital
  72. 72. Infrastructure
  73. 73. Place
  74. 74. Target industries • Aerospace • Clean technology – Biomass, renewable fuel sources • Life sciences • Information technology • Health care • Medical devices • Freight and logistics • Travel and tourism
  75. 75. Investment
  76. 76. Encouragement • Business retention – Airport related – FGCU • Focus on human capital • Foster entrepreneurship • Education
  77. 77. Recruitment • Long odds game • Requires focus, clarity • Customer service, capacity • Central points of contact, role clarity
  78. 78. Focus • Consistent messaging • Leadership • Patience • Long-term payoffs
  79. 79. Policy • CURRENT: County General Plan Update – Ensure that the Research and Enterprise Diamond vision is emphatically articulated in the Update. – Define the resulting supportive regulations and catalytic capital investments • CONCURRENT/FUTURE: Zoning & Regs Update – Where new formats critical, revise development regulations to provide greater investment reliability (i.e. form-based) for both investors and neighbors – The Land Development Code’s Compact Communities Regulations is an example and template.
  80. 80. Industrialization v.2: City Pattern re-organized using Industrial Principles Business park Shopping Center “City as Machine” (CIAM 1933) • • • • Economy Focused on Making & Moving Goods Synchronized routines Segregated land uses linked by vehicle “conveyor belts” Mass consumption © Freedman Tung + Sasaki 2013 Housing Subdivision
  81. 81. Conventional Zoning 1. Very Restrictive Use Control (Use Separation) 2. Very Specific Density & FAR Control 3. Not Enough Building Scale, Type, Form, & Character Control Hard to envision and predict physical outcomes
  82. 82. TOOL – District/Form Based Regulations: • Regulations that shape physical characteristics of buildings for compatibility, such as orientation, volume, relationship to the street, and architecture/massing. • Regulations that are more flexible about adjacent uses that are compatible with each other (e.g. housing, workplaces, services) • These provide greater investment security by insuring that new (or renovated) buildings will be located near others of similar type.
  83. 83. “Sense of place” • Understand the “pieces of city” (neighborhoods, subdistricts) whose in-common physical and performance characteristics of development tell you where you are. • Each “piece of city” has to have developments of physical coherence and regularity to make them recognizable, valuable and secure for investing. < < < OUTSKIRTS < < < The “Urban Transect” (from the Smart Code, v.7) > > > CENTERS > > >
  84. 84. Code Focused on Physical Outcomes 1. District Zones / Standards 2. Corridor Frontages / Standards.
  85. 85. Land Use Zones District Zones Define the Places for Incubators, Accelerators, Training Organizations, Technical Assistance, NGOs, Institutions, Regulators…
  86. 86. Capital Improvements • Priority Catalyst Projects – Multi-modal street improvements – Transit links for highest-priority destinations – Boulevard Street Tree Plantings (ensure that Lee County’s natural image remains visible along entry corridors) • Public-private partnerships to enable highspeed internet connectivity opportunities (dark fiber activation, etc.)
  87. 87. The Public Agency Role: 1. Lead (or support) the vision 2. Provide a reliable policy context for investment at different scales 3. Ensure the emergence of critical physical elements (especially the infrastructure + public pieces)
  88. 88. Thanks! • • • • • • • • • • • AIA Florida Southwest Lee County Port Authority Florida Gulf Coast University Lee County Metropolitan Planning Organization Real Estate Investment Society Estero Council of Community Leaders Horizon Council Lee County Community Sustainability Advisory Committee Alliance for the Arts Lee County Board of County Commissioners Lee County Departments: Community Development, GIS, Transportation, Parks & Recreation, Visitor & Convention Bureau, Economic Development, Administration, Office of Sustainability
  89. 89. www.aia.org/liv_sdat

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