SlideShare a Scribd company logo
1 of 17
Download to read offline
1 
Greater West Dayton Corridor Strategy 
‘A Framework for Investment’ 
Summary 
October 13, 2014 
Overview 
In 2012, the West Dayton Development Fund Advisory Committee decided to move forward to fund a comprehensive corridor study for West Dayton. The geography for the study would cover all of the Innerwest and Southwest Priority Board areas. 
While there have been many studies, planning and project efforts that have occurred over the last 35 years or so, a comprehensive analysis and study of West Dayton Corridors has not taken place since the 1970’s. In the 1970’s, Dayton developed and adopted the West Dayton Road Network strategy. It looked far into the future to identify strategic major improvements to enhance the road network. The goal was to significantly improve access to major West Dayton employers (General Motors and the Veterans Administration, for example) and possible development sites (former Sucher meat packing site and the McCall Printing site). At that time, Dayton was seeking to pre-empt any impacts which might occur to the marketplace if the effort to build the I-675 connector became successful. Dayton opposed the construction of the suburban southeast beltway at that time because it was believed that the beltway would siphon jobs from within the city to the suburban communities. The West Dayton Road Network strategy sought to strengthen the economic base of the city (West Dayton in particular) by improving easy, convenient and timely access while seeking to improve the physical image of the community with the building of attractive, tree-lined parkways and boulevards. 
The outcome of the effort resulted in the planning, design and construction of Edwin C. Moses Boulevard, James H. McGee Boulevard, C.J. McLin Parkway (US 35 West) and associated modest connecting improvements along the Germantown corridor. It has taken years to begin to see the advances that those corridor investments helped to create. Most notably, Edwin C. Moses Boulevard has seen a transformation to a major regional education/healthcare/institution corridor that experienced significant investment as well as a major image shift. Much can also be said of the McLin Parkway and McGee Boulevard corridors. 
These efforts occurred as Dayton and the region experienced seismic shifts from 20th century manufacturing. Dayton lost thousands of manufacturing jobs and businesses in that period. With the
2 
loss of those jobs, corresponding losses in households which occupied the homes and neighborhoods that housed manufacturing workers occurred. The impact of the job losses in the manufacturing sector were compounded when the region built the I-675 corridor and continue today with the most recent completion of the Austin Boulevard interchange. While the region has spread out more than 50% in geographic area since the 1970’s, the Dayton regional population has slightly decreased. While there has been significant churning within the regional job market, there have not been trends to indicate that there has been any overall significant increase in the regional jobs market. 
While the above conditions have had significant impact on Dayton and its challenges, West Dayton has experienced a disproportionate share of those challenges given the large base of 20th century manufacturing companies and jobs that evaporated in that same time period. 
It was within that perspective that the West Dayton Development Fund Advisory Committee acted to invest time, effort and resources to take a fresh new look at the present and future status of strategic West Dayton corridors and their potential impacts. 
The Process 
The process for the study and research effort stimulated the beginnings of a community conversation which broadened the breadth of that conversation. 
First of all, the ‘Greater West Dayton Corridor Strategy – A Framework for Investment’ is not a plan. It was initially launched as a research and study-based process to provide direction for the next generation of infrastructure investment in thoroughfares, corridors and parkways in West Dayton. The resultant research approach has produced important and intriguing information and data regarding assets, investments, trends, challenges and opportunities in the study area. 
The process evolved into an opportunity to engage a broad range of key West Dayton stakeholders in a community conversation to explore possibilities for a new, future West Dayton by linking strategic reimaging with the leveraging and targeting of investment. The Dayton model of collaboration (over the last 15 years or so) is to advance and leverage community and economic investment and development through partnering, collaboration and civic engagement. The model has been leveraging community leadership (for example, Phoenix, Genesis, DaVinci, Wright- Dunbar, Neighborhood School Centers, etc.). It is within that
3 
context, that the ‘Greater West Dayton Corridor Strategy – A Framework for Investment’ is providing a community opportunity to help strengthen existing partnering efforts and function as a platform for the formation of new collaborations. 
Framework Intent 
With this type of research and asset-based approach, the process was intended to achieve the following: 
- Create an opportunity to formulate a new, forward-looking 21st century corridor development strategy that will: 
o Envision how the strategic corridors of West Dayton will look, how they will function, how they ought to interconnect with assets and opportunities, what investment possibilities might be leveraged, how they might convey the stories about the past, present and future of the Greater West Dayton community – and – and how those stories might impact a refreshed image of West Dayton and result in future investment. 
o Apply ‘livable streets’ urban design concepts to strategic corridors and craft a 5 to 10 year strategy for developing, funding and implementing these opportunities. 
- Develop short and long-term, opportunity-based strategies, programs and development projects for residential, institutional, educational, commercial and industrial uses as well as for greening and open space development that would be driven by community coalitions, collaborations and partnerships. 
The Emergent, Strategic, Asset-Based Approach to Investment and Development for Dayton 
Since the late 1990’s, Dayton has been engaged in a continuous, organic process of redefining, rethinking and reimaging itself in the following manner (Highlights): 
- Focus on the asset base, strategic investments and seek to leverage those; 
- Support the creation and expansion of 21st century, technology-based job development; 
- Support, facilitate and grow place-based collaborations; 
o Genesis, Phoenix, DaVinci, Renaissance, Greater Wright-Dunbar, the Greater 
Downtown, Greater Rubicon Park, the Aerospace Hub Network, Neighborhood School Centers, etc. 
- Rethink Dayton streets as Livable Streets and focus on an overall, citywide image changing, 
strategic corridor strategy; 
- Strategically rebuild and reinvest in infrastructure while creating new Dayton public work landmarks; 
- Remove significant numbers of physically and outdated obsolete structures and manage the shift to reimage a community of both new and emerging green and garden neighborhood areas; 
- Encourage and attract the entry of immigrants to Dayton as an Immigrant Friendly community; 
- Lastly, help to emerge, craft and support a vision for Dayton as a City of Learners to improve educational achievement, create future
4 
employment options for Dayton residents and create opportunities to link for neighborhoods, businesses and institutions to connect with neighborhood and community schools. 
Economic Underpinning – Looking Forward 
Over the last 2 generations, the economic underpinning of West Dayton, the City of Dayton and the region (within the context of the emergent global economy) has changed forever. The traditional, less- efficient 20th century model of manufacturing has gone through a major revolution in the U.S. and Dayton. Advanced manufacturing has fused with technology, focusing on the creation of prototypes and products beyond the auto industry and U.S. shores. With the loss of many 20th century, high-paying assembly line and manufacturing jobs, a corresponding number of workers, homeowners, renters, residents, shoppers and students of West Dayton neighborhoods slowly melted away. This trend resulted in increases in home and neighborhood abandonment and higher rates of poverty. 
Factors within our Region: 
- The Dayton region has good paying, high-tech jobs within our region that go unfilled for lack of a well-trained workforce that aligns with those needs; 
- Since the 1970’s, the Dayton region has sprawled out by more than 50% in geographic area while population has slightly decreased; 
- Contractions in the job base have occurred as real estate product has increased regionally, significantly weakening the Dayton (and West Dayton) real estate market; 
- Real estate development has not created corresponding economic development on a regional level. 
Opportunities for Dayton: 
- A community that still retains a central location and significant access and transportation 
advantages; 
- A community that has seen a level of investment in both infrastructure and institutions since 2000 that has not been experienced since the 1960’s (conservatively estimated at about $3.6B); 
- A community that represents the authentic essence of local history, traditions, heritage and inventiveness – a solid basis for future placemaking and economic competitiveness; 
- A city that has about 100,000 fewer residents today than it had in the 1960’s. It a less dense city –
5 
however – a city that has an opportunity to be reformed and reimagined as a 21st century garden city that may have been a component of the 1911 Olmsted Brothers plan for Dayton; 
- A city that maintains bountiful educational and healthcare institutions as well as cultural, recreational, entertainment, heritage and transportation assets; 
- A city whose center wraps around a continuous system of waterways and greenways known as the Miami 
Conservancy District and animated by Five Rivers MetroParks; 
- A community that is nurturing and growing a skill base in partnerships and collaborations. 
Key Facts and Indicators 
The research of the study process identified some key facts and indicators for consideration in contemplating, thinking about shaping a future view for the greater West Dayton. When viewed as a whole, it appears that a paradox exists in West Dayton (as it does across the entire city). While there are undeniable, troubling challenges facing the community, there are corresponding positive signs of strength, strategic advantage and opportunity: 
- There are about 25,000 residents in West Dayton today. The 2010 census showed about a 24% decrease of residents when compared to 2010. Dayton has a whole continues to lose population while the region remains relatively flat. However, thousands of units of new housing continue to 
be built and placed on the regional landscape; 
- Three West Dayton neighborhoods gained population between 2000 and 2010 – Little Richmond, Stoney Ridge, Five Points; 
- West Dayton contains about 10,400 acres and represents almost 30% of Dayton in land area; 
- West Dayton has about 160 churches or faith-based community places where citizens gather to worship and engage in community support activities; 
- West Dayton contains about 15,000 units of housing with about a 24% vacancy rate. 
- West Dayton has experienced the construction of more new replacement housing than in any other sector of the city; 
- West Dayton has an unemployment rate of about 28%. This is higher than the city average and significantly higher that the region; 
- About 27% of West Dayton residents have some level of 
higher education; 
- West Dayton has nine new Dayton Public School educational facilities – more than any other quadrant of the city; 
- West Dayton has the presence of Sinclair Community College, Central State, Wright State University and University of Dayton facilities; 
- West Dayton has exceptional access within the city and the region – both in terms of travel time and convenience; 
- There are about 12,000 jobs in West Dayton today. If the jobs
6 
were all filled by West Dayton residents that would average to about one job for every two 
residents. 
o Healthcare employs about 4200 people and leads the job numbers; 
o Manufacturing employs about 1400 people – while large numbers of assembly line jobs were lost over two generations, West Dayton has advanced manufacturing present and growing in the community. 
- The VA campus employs more than 2500 people in full or part-time jobs making it the largest single employer in West Dayton. In addition, the campus is in the midst of a five-year, $80m+ capital improvement process making it an economic engine within the community and has recently completed an unprecedented campus master plan. 
- West Dayton has seen more than $780M in major investment between 2001 and 2013, putting it on competitive ground with downtown and the other quadrants of the city. 
Summary of Framework Components 
Community and Culture: 
- Historic/Legacy/Heritage sites 
- Arts facilities and assets 
- Sports and recreational venues, facilities and programs 
- Neighborhood commercial clusters 
Neighborhoods and Education and Training: 
- Schools 
- Higher education 
- Churches 
- Community centers and programs 
- Engaged citizenry 
Employment Clusters and Business Development: 
- Institutions 
- Education and training facilities 
- Development opportunity areas 
o Brownfields, grayfields, greenfields 
- Large and modest scale employers 
- Business clusters and nodes
7 
The greatest opportunity for the future of West Dayton may be to strengthen existing and create new connections to maximize the leverage of the above-mentioned asset base: 
- Build and strengthen social capital and civic engagement; 
- Contribute to the reimaging for West Dayton through enhancements and improvements important strategic corridors; 
- Strengthen access and mobility within the community by improving transportation options such as walking, biking and enhanced use of public transportation. 
Possible Strategic Opportunities 
Thoroughfares, Corridors and Parkway Opportunities 
- Create a vision for the next generation of strategic corridor development to leverage 
investment; 
o Link redevelopment planning and project development to infrastructure investments; 
o Consider the travel experience of all users of 
the corridors; 
o Develop a 5 to 10 year strategy to enhance the strategic thoroughfares, corridors and parkways of Greater West Dayton to best connect clusters of opportunity and leverage investment; 
o Visualize and design the strategic gateways; 
o Integrate and align with the city wide thoroughfare plan and corridor strategy; 
o Plan for the corridor interface and image with connecting neighborhoods. 
- Reimage and Strengthen the Competitive Advantage of Place 
o Gateways of McLin Parkway (McLin Parkway as a key Dayton and regional corridor for development) 
 Gettysburg Avenue and the VA interchange 
 McCall Street and Abbey Interchange 
 James H. McGee Interchange 
 US 35 and I-75 Interchange 
- Reimage and Strengthen the View of the Community 
o Third Street, Germantown, Gettysburg, McGee Corridors 
 Enhance commercial clusters 
 Opportunities for institutions and business stakeholders to adopt and provide foster care for key sections of the corridors 
 Evolve and grow the parkway concept along the sections of the corridors where demolition has occurred and will be occurring 
 Third Street as a local, regional and national Heritage Corridor
8 
 McGee/Wolf Creek Corridor as a green, recreational and nature corridor 
- Reimage and Strengthen Neighborhoods, Streets and Parkways 
o Hoover, Oakridge, Broadway and Others 
 Enhance neighborhood and community business clusters 
 Opportunities for neighborhood and 
community institutions to adopt and provide foster care for key sections of corridors 
 Strategic demolition and greening on important and well-travelled neighborhood streets 
Possible Corporate Partnering Opportunities 
- Encourage, Build and Support Partnerships and Collaborations 
o Institutions and major employers: 
 Standard Register, Dayton VA Medical Center, Quickstep Composites, Sugar Creek 
Packing Company, Malt Products, others; 
o Cultivate strategic partnerships in an effort to 
retain and create jobs in market-driven sectors; 
o Continue to advance planning and facilitate redevelopment of key West Dayton Brownfield, Grayfield and Greenfield development sites (examples): 
 Westview Industrial (Business) Park, Wright Factory Business Park, Northwest 
Industrial Park 
Possible Community and Corporate Partnering Opportunities 
- Building and capitalizing on cultural heritage: 
o Advocacy and Support for the Veterans Administration 20-Year Master Plan: 
 National Register Historic District within the VA Campus; 
 Potential for locating a national veterans archive; 
 Quality Medical Services for all Veterans.
9 
o Additional theming of strategic corridors: 
 E.C Moses – healthcare and cultural institutions, Third Street as a Heritage Corridor connecting the VA, Wright airplane factory, Wright-Dunbar, Wright-Patt, and others. 
o Potentially crafting and layering of existing and possible new heritage trails – such as adding a Dayton Civil Rights Trail to enhance and complement the Dayton Aviation Trail. 
- Continue to rethink and actively reimage neighborhoods: 
o Which are the Garden Neighborhoods, the Learning Neighborhoods, Intergenerational Neighborhoods; Organically plan, reimage and coordinate one at a time as partnering and leadership opportunities reveal themselves. 
Possible Community Partnering Opportunities 
- Encourage, Build and Support Corporate and Community Partnerships and Collaborations: 
o Education and Neighborhoods - Opportunity- based, leadership driven, supportive partnerships: 
 Align and link social capital opportunities such as connecting church congregations, corporate and/or institutional volunteers with the schools network to improve educational achievement and attainment; 
 Workforce development, financial 
literacy, homeownership. 
o Brainstorm the possibilities about education and training as a new major 21st century industry for West Dayton; 
o If education and training were envisioned as a major new 21st century industry for West Dayton, imagine the possibilities of thinking about West Dayton as a great learning campus and the power of that image. 
Moving Forward 
The Greater West Dayton Study – ‘A Framework for Investment’ was essentially undertaken to support the efforts to uplift and improve the Greater West Dayton community. The challenges that the communities like the greater West Dayton face are sometimes disregarded by other, less fortunate cities and communities. However in Dayton, a shared model of community leadership is working to advance and address challenges through collaboration and focusing on assets and opportunities. The desired
10 
outcome in these endeavors in Dayton is to craft and develop strategies to facilitate and leverage redevelopment and investment. This successful approach to create a more sustainable and stable community is evidenced by the City’s Sustainable Practices Policy and other planning activities. Examples include community anchors such as the Dayton VA Medical Center and support for their Master Plan or other examples of collaborative efforts in such West Dayton neighborhoods like the Westwood, Roosevelt and Wright-Dunbar. 
As part of this engagement process, the City of Dayton proposes to employ the collaborative, community leadership model to establish an advisory committee comprised of business leaders, community leaders, property owners, city and other local government entities as well as members of the public. Initially, the focus of the advisory committee will be to: 
- Function as a group to think about the context of the greater good of the entire West Dayton area (as outlined in the study) and provide guidance and leadership to advance and support existing and future ‘hotspots’ of community investment and improvement efforts; 
- Provide community support to advance the endorsement of the Dayton VA Medical Center Master Plan. 
- Provide guidance to the conversation to develop a 5 to 10 year strategy to improve, enhance and reimage the strategic thoroughfares, corridors and parkways of Greater West Dayton through infrastructure improvements and investments. 
- Serve to provide guidance to advance the next step efforts in the planning and development of key major brownfield and greenfield sites including the Westview Business Park, the area anchored by the Wright Airplane Factory site and future opportunities in the Northwest Park Industrial Park while seeking opportunities to leverage additional development. 
- Function as a community resource to lend brainpower, advice, expertise, input, feedback and wisdom to West Dayton community led efforts as requested or as might be needed. 
To paraphrase a simple but beautiful quote from Abraham Lincoln: 
“The best way to predict your future is to create it”
11 
Major Dayton Investments From 2001 Through 2013 
October 13, 2014 – City of Dayton 
The City of Dayton has been tracking major investments since 2001. The tracking is ongoing and continually being updated. While Dayton has been shedding both population and jobs for much of a generation, there is a narrative that runs counter to those trends. Dayton has seen more than $3.6B in major investments since 2001. The city has arguably not experienced that level or scale of investment since the 1960’s. The continuing investment in institutions, major businesses and infrastructure does indicate that the asset base of Dayton is showing strength – particularly among institutions and in infrastructure. 
This is a summary of investments by geographic quadrants as well as the airport and the downtown area. The detail contained within this document represents known investments that have occurred in the west quadrant of Dayton (Innerwest and Southwest Priority Board areas). While the list is extensive, it is not necessarily comprehensive and is certainly incomplete. 
We encourage you to take time to review the list and we would appreciate any information which you might have to identify investments that we have not included in this summary. If you have additional information, you may e-mail it to John Gower at johndewey2@woh.rr.com or mail it to: 
John Gower 
Urban Design Coordinator 
Office of the City Manager 
City Hall 
101 West Third Street 
Dayton, Ohio 45402 
Any additional information or data that you provide will be appreciated and integrated into the data base of investments
12 
Downtown (CBD, Webster Station, Midtown) $718M 
West (Innerwest, Southwest) $783M 
Northwest (Northwest, FROC) $360M 
Northeast $388M 
Southeast $899M 
Airport $400M 
City Wide Right-of-Way Infrastructure $33.7M 
Total $3.58B + 
• This is based on conservative estimates of major investments. The larger scale investments are linked with institutions and infrastructure. The estimates account for actual dollars invested for this time period as of 12-31-13.
13 
Strategic West Dayton Investments 
2001 – 2013 
Greater Carillon – West Dayton 
- E.C Moses Rebuild – 2003 $3M 
- IRG – Wisconsin Boulevard $11.3M 
- Marriott Courtyard $20M 
- I-75 – Phase 1A $58M 
- Elizabeth Place - 2004 forward $20.9M est. 
- Ponitz Career Technology Center $38M 
- Howard Paper site prep $1.5M 
- Kindred Hospital $35M 
- Welcome Stadium $1M 
- Concord Foods $0.28M 
- Ware Banquet Center – Cincinnati Street $0.08M 
- Third District Police HQ Interiors – 2007 $.32M 
- Fifth Street Bridge TE - $400,000 (1/2 to west, ½ to DT) $.2M 
- Washington Street Bridge 2007 $7.3M (1/2 to west, ½ to DT) $3.65M 
- Stewart Street Bridge $17.3m (1/2 to west, ½ to Rubicon) $8.2M 
- Bonbright warehouse $7.2M 
- Sinclair Automotive $35M 
- University of Dayton 
o UD Arena Renovation $13.1M 
o Baseball/Softball Fields $4M 
 SUB 260M $ 
Greater Wright-Dunbar – West Dayton 
WDI 
- Properties and Improvements $5.7M 
- Parking Facilities $1.3M 
Infrastructure 
- Improvements at E.C Moses Boulevard – 2003 $0.1M 
- Dunbar Bridge $2.3M (1/2 to SW/IW, ½ to NW/FROC) $1.15M 
- Moses Bridge $4.6M (1/2 to SW/IW, ½ to NW/FROC) $2.3M 
- West Third Streetscape $1.8M 
- Conover/Zion Parking Lots $2.6M 
- Broadway Bridge $2.5M (1/2 to SW/IW, ½ to NW/FROC $1.25M 
- Paul Laurence Dunbar Street enhancement $0.365M 
- Safe Routes to School $0.5M
14 
- Wright-Dunbar Street Rehab – Phase 3 – 2003 $0.45M 
- Wright-Dunbar Street Rehab – Phase 3, Section 2 – 2005 $0.18M 
- Wright-Dunbar Street Rehab – Phase 3, Section 3 – 2006 $0.54M 
- Wright-Dunbar Village Transportation Enhancements – Phase 2 – 2010 $0.49 
Non-Profits/Government 
- Dayton Aviation National Park Building $25M 
- Paul Laurence Dunbar House Museum Expansion $1.4M 
- Zion/RTA Cultural Center $3.3M 
- Dayton Urban League/MVHOC $3M 
- MVRPC Center for Regional Cooperation $0.3M 
- Wright-Sites (Dayton Aviation Commission) $0.75M 
- Mt. Enon Family Life Center $4.5M 
Educational 
- Mound Street Academies $0.8M 
- Central State University Dayton Campus $1.5M 
- Miami Valley Child Development Center $1.56M 
- Edison PreK thru 8 $12M 
Housing 
- New Housing – ISUS $11.265M 
- Citirama (2003) $12.5M 
- Hawthorne Village 2011 $1.5M 
- Germantown Village 2013 $11.4M 
- City Forest $11.9M 
- Ecumenical Homes $8M 
Business & Healthcare 
- Cassano Center $5.5M 
- Drew Center $3M 
- Pri-Med Physicians $1.1M 
- STAN Solutions $0.5M 
- Bing Davis Art Studio & Ebonia Gallery $0.3M 
- WDAO Radio $.277M 
- Smokin’s Joes $0.1M 
- Rashid Properties $0.3M 
- State Farm Insurance Office $0.2M 
- Zik’s Family Pharmacy $0.33M 
- Wright-Patt Credit Union $0.35M 
- Small business startups $0.525M 
- Hospice of Dayton $0.375M
15 
- Innerwest Priority Board Office $1.5M 
- Assembly & Test Worldwide $0.175M 
- Automated Building Components – 2004 $0.25M 
Recreational 
- Oak & Ivy park $0.78M 
- Dakota Center $0.25M 
- Friendship Park Improvement – 2009 $0.1 
Strategic Demolition $ 
NSP Housing $ 
Sub for Greater Wright-Dunbar $145M 
Greater Roosevelt – West Dayton 
- Dayton Recreation Center $8M 
- DPS All Boys Academy $13.9M 
- Roosevelt Homes $4.5M 
- McCall Driveway and Parking Improvement (Inf) – 2004 $0.39M 
- McCall’s Brownfield/Repositioning $2.25M 
- NIBCO Brownfield/Repositioning $1.5M 
- McGee Boulevard extension to Germantown – 2012 $1.4M 
- McGee Boulevard Widening - 2003 (at Gettysburg) $2.1M 
- Bridge Street Bridge Replacement - $4M (1/2 to west, ½ to NW) $2 M 
- Rosedale Bridge – 2011 - $3.4M (1/2 to West, ½ to NW/FROC) $1.7M 
- McGee Boulevard Rehab – 2011 $1.2M 
- McGee Boulevard Rehab – 2012 $1.1M 
- McGee Boulevard Rehab – 2013 $0.925M 
 SUB $41M 
Greater Madden Hills – West Dayton 
- Dunbar High School $18M 
- Louise Troy Pre-K thru 8 $12M 
- Wogoman Pre – K thru 8 $12M 
- Germantown Street Reconstruction – 2005 $3.5M 
- Huffie’s Barbeque $0.144M 
- Mallory Park Spray Park – 2004 .07M 
 SUB for Greater Madden Hills $45.5M
16 
Greater VA - West Dayton 
- National Composite Center – Advanced material Campus $1.5M 
- Lyons Place - 2009 $9.8M 
- Ohio Avenue Commons (VA) $2.5M 
- Nanotek Instruments $1M 
- Arlington Courts demolition $1M 
- Greater Dayton Heritage Redevelopment (Formerly Delphi) $5M 
- VA Campus upgrades $131M 
- Arlington Park Spray park – 2004 $.07M 
 SUB for Greater VA $151.8 M 
Southwest/West 
Housing 
- Dayton Homes I $8.5M 
- Lofts at Hoover - 2007 $5.6M 
- Stratford Place - 2006 $4.5M 
- New Dayton Homes I $7M 
- Sunlight Homes - 2006 $5.6M 
- Almond Village $6.0M 
- Stoney Ridge – 2008 $6.4M 
- Men’s Gateway Shelter $4.8M 
- DMHA 
o Malden/Hollencamp - 2009 $0.35M 
o Limestone/Modena - 2009 $0.4M 
Schools 
- Thurgood Marshall $25.5M 
- Residence Park Pre-k Thru 8 $12M 
- Westwood Pre-K thru 8 $12M 
Infrastructure 
- Petunia Drive - 2001 $0.9M 
- Parks & Rec asphalt resurfacing - 2002 $0.3M 
- Clemmer Street reconstruction – 2003 $0.3M 
- West Dayton Splash Parks – 2003 $0.21M 
- Gettysburg Rehabilitation – 2004 $2.4M 
- Parks & Rec Asphalt Resurfacing – 2004 $0.09M 
- Stony Hollow Road cul-de-sac – 2007 $0.07M 
- Germantown Utility Relocations – 2007 $.1M 
- City railroad Track realignment – 2008 $0.5M 
- Goodlow Avenue bridge Replacement/Culvert – 2009 $0.22M 
- Water Main Replacement – McArthur/Germantown -2004 $0.79M
17 
- Water Main Installation – Nicholas Road – 2009 $0.6M 
- Asphalt resurfacing – 2004 $0.06M 
- Traffic Signal Replacements – Elmhurst/Third & Others – 2010 $1.725M 
- Gettysburg/Third & Others – 2010 $0.75M 
- Hoover/Culvert Replacement – 2012 $.68 
Business 
- Sugarcreek $32.9M 
- Lorrits-Neilson Funeral Home $0.45M 
 SUB for southwest/west $140M 
Strategic Demolition $ 
TOTAL for all West (Innerwest and Southwest) $783M

More Related Content

What's hot

Huntington Station Development Strategy
Huntington Station Development StrategyHuntington Station Development Strategy
Huntington Station Development Strategy
Neil Takemoto
 
ResumeMatthewLindley060315
ResumeMatthewLindley060315ResumeMatthewLindley060315
ResumeMatthewLindley060315
Matt Lindley
 
WRT at the New Green Economy Conference
WRT at the New Green Economy ConferenceWRT at the New Green Economy Conference
WRT at the New Green Economy Conference
Wallace Roberts & Todd
 
Green Economy Presentation
Green Economy PresentationGreen Economy Presentation
Green Economy Presentation
WRT
 
Philip Singleton CV September 2015 LinkedIn
Philip Singleton CV September 2015 LinkedInPhilip Singleton CV September 2015 LinkedIn
Philip Singleton CV September 2015 LinkedIn
Philip Singleton
 
12.13.13 real property law institute
12.13.13 real property law institute12.13.13 real property law institute
12.13.13 real property law institute
The Port
 

What's hot (17)

Huntington Station Development Strategy
Huntington Station Development StrategyHuntington Station Development Strategy
Huntington Station Development Strategy
 
G5 Integrated Place-Based Economic Development
G5 Integrated Place-Based Economic DevelopmentG5 Integrated Place-Based Economic Development
G5 Integrated Place-Based Economic Development
 
Have you ever tried this
Have you ever tried thisHave you ever tried this
Have you ever tried this
 
Climbing the Hill
Climbing the HillClimbing the Hill
Climbing the Hill
 
F2 Restoring Vibrant Downtowns
F2 Restoring Vibrant DowntownsF2 Restoring Vibrant Downtowns
F2 Restoring Vibrant Downtowns
 
Redevelopment Authority Economic Impact in City of Cincinnati
Redevelopment Authority Economic Impact in City of CincinnatiRedevelopment Authority Economic Impact in City of Cincinnati
Redevelopment Authority Economic Impact in City of Cincinnati
 
ResumeMatthewLindley060315
ResumeMatthewLindley060315ResumeMatthewLindley060315
ResumeMatthewLindley060315
 
WRT at the New Green Economy Conference
WRT at the New Green Economy ConferenceWRT at the New Green Economy Conference
WRT at the New Green Economy Conference
 
Green Economy Presentation
Green Economy PresentationGreen Economy Presentation
Green Economy Presentation
 
Quality Growth Toolbox Reinvesting
Quality Growth Toolbox ReinvestingQuality Growth Toolbox Reinvesting
Quality Growth Toolbox Reinvesting
 
Philip Singleton CV September 2015 LinkedIn
Philip Singleton CV September 2015 LinkedInPhilip Singleton CV September 2015 LinkedIn
Philip Singleton CV September 2015 LinkedIn
 
12.13.13 real property law institute
12.13.13 real property law institute12.13.13 real property law institute
12.13.13 real property law institute
 
How Cincinnati Addresses Urban Revitalization
How Cincinnati Addresses Urban RevitalizationHow Cincinnati Addresses Urban Revitalization
How Cincinnati Addresses Urban Revitalization
 
Vision for Haverhill Comprehensive Plan Concept & Framework
Vision for Haverhill Comprehensive Plan Concept & FrameworkVision for Haverhill Comprehensive Plan Concept & Framework
Vision for Haverhill Comprehensive Plan Concept & Framework
 
The Living Loop
The Living LoopThe Living Loop
The Living Loop
 
Resume2rev [1]
Resume2rev [1]Resume2rev [1]
Resume2rev [1]
 
Downtown & Infill Tax Increment Districts
Downtown & Infill Tax Increment DistrictsDowntown & Infill Tax Increment Districts
Downtown & Infill Tax Increment Districts
 

Similar to Greater West Dayton Corridor Strategy: A Framework for Investment

Dept Dev Serv City of Hartford Annual Report
Dept Dev Serv City of Hartford Annual ReportDept Dev Serv City of Hartford Annual Report
Dept Dev Serv City of Hartford Annual Report
Lauren Varjabedian
 
Directory 2016 3rd ed. +Covers
Directory 2016 3rd ed. +CoversDirectory 2016 3rd ed. +Covers
Directory 2016 3rd ed. +Covers
Joshua Wilson
 
Tax Increment Financing
Tax Increment Financing Tax Increment Financing
Tax Increment Financing
NCRProgram
 
PuttingPlacesFirst
PuttingPlacesFirstPuttingPlacesFirst
PuttingPlacesFirst
Charles Tso
 
2009 Community Report_2010
2009 Community Report_20102009 Community Report_2010
2009 Community Report_2010
Alyssa Berry
 
MeetStephenAntupit2015
MeetStephenAntupit2015MeetStephenAntupit2015
MeetStephenAntupit2015
mrmarvy
 
Toni griffin presentation
Toni griffin presentationToni griffin presentation
Toni griffin presentation
nrcampbell79
 

Similar to Greater West Dayton Corridor Strategy: A Framework for Investment (20)

Urban Growth Strategy 2012-2032
Urban Growth Strategy 2012-2032Urban Growth Strategy 2012-2032
Urban Growth Strategy 2012-2032
 
Historic West End Initiative - February 2018 Community Meeting
Historic West End Initiative - February 2018 Community MeetingHistoric West End Initiative - February 2018 Community Meeting
Historic West End Initiative - February 2018 Community Meeting
 
forging-a-future
forging-a-futureforging-a-future
forging-a-future
 
Indianapolis SDAT report
Indianapolis SDAT reportIndianapolis SDAT report
Indianapolis SDAT report
 
Hollywood Road Corridor
Hollywood Road CorridorHollywood Road Corridor
Hollywood Road Corridor
 
Dept Dev Serv City of Hartford Annual Report
Dept Dev Serv City of Hartford Annual ReportDept Dev Serv City of Hartford Annual Report
Dept Dev Serv City of Hartford Annual Report
 
MAPC's Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant Project Posters
MAPC's Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant Project PostersMAPC's Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant Project Posters
MAPC's Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant Project Posters
 
Directory 2016 3rd ed. +Covers
Directory 2016 3rd ed. +CoversDirectory 2016 3rd ed. +Covers
Directory 2016 3rd ed. +Covers
 
Big Spring Downtown Concept Plan, Part One
Big Spring Downtown Concept Plan, Part OneBig Spring Downtown Concept Plan, Part One
Big Spring Downtown Concept Plan, Part One
 
Tax Increment Financing
Tax Increment Financing Tax Increment Financing
Tax Increment Financing
 
PuttingPlacesFirst
PuttingPlacesFirstPuttingPlacesFirst
PuttingPlacesFirst
 
2013 Neighborhood Profiles
2013 Neighborhood Profiles2013 Neighborhood Profiles
2013 Neighborhood Profiles
 
Inner City Regeneration - Robin Carlisle
Inner City Regeneration - Robin CarlisleInner City Regeneration - Robin Carlisle
Inner City Regeneration - Robin Carlisle
 
2009 Community Report_2010
2009 Community Report_20102009 Community Report_2010
2009 Community Report_2010
 
MeetStephenAntupit2015
MeetStephenAntupit2015MeetStephenAntupit2015
MeetStephenAntupit2015
 
Toni griffin presentation
Toni griffin presentationToni griffin presentation
Toni griffin presentation
 
Fire d project
Fire d projectFire d project
Fire d project
 
Recommendation Report and Proposal Project
Recommendation Report and Proposal ProjectRecommendation Report and Proposal Project
Recommendation Report and Proposal Project
 
Helper sdat report final
Helper sdat report finalHelper sdat report final
Helper sdat report final
 
African village LA
African village LAAfrican village LA
African village LA
 

More from City of Dayton

More from City of Dayton (20)

Dwsg 2017 registration packet
Dwsg 2017 registration packetDwsg 2017 registration packet
Dwsg 2017 registration packet
 
Review of 2017 Crime Rates
Review of 2017 Crime RatesReview of 2017 Crime Rates
Review of 2017 Crime Rates
 
2016 Dayton World Soccer Games - RESULTS
2016 Dayton World Soccer Games - RESULTS2016 Dayton World Soccer Games - RESULTS
2016 Dayton World Soccer Games - RESULTS
 
Dayton World Soccer Games 2016 - Brackets
Dayton World Soccer Games 2016 - BracketsDayton World Soccer Games 2016 - Brackets
Dayton World Soccer Games 2016 - Brackets
 
How to Interact with Law Enforcement Officers
How to Interact with Law Enforcement OfficersHow to Interact with Law Enforcement Officers
How to Interact with Law Enforcement Officers
 
Welcome Belmont - Year One Report
Welcome Belmont - Year One ReportWelcome Belmont - Year One Report
Welcome Belmont - Year One Report
 
Dayton World Soccer Games 2016 - Registration Packet
Dayton World Soccer Games 2016 - Registration PacketDayton World Soccer Games 2016 - Registration Packet
Dayton World Soccer Games 2016 - Registration Packet
 
1889 Photo Tour of Dayton
1889 Photo Tour of Dayton1889 Photo Tour of Dayton
1889 Photo Tour of Dayton
 
Dayton Transportation Plan 2040 - Overview
Dayton Transportation Plan 2040 - OverviewDayton Transportation Plan 2040 - Overview
Dayton Transportation Plan 2040 - Overview
 
Dayton World Soccer Games 2015 Registration Packet
Dayton World Soccer Games 2015 Registration PacketDayton World Soccer Games 2015 Registration Packet
Dayton World Soccer Games 2015 Registration Packet
 
Dayton Kickball Tournament 2015 (Registration Packet)
Dayton Kickball Tournament 2015 (Registration Packet)Dayton Kickball Tournament 2015 (Registration Packet)
Dayton Kickball Tournament 2015 (Registration Packet)
 
City Manager's Recommended 2015 Investment Plan
City Manager's Recommended 2015 Investment PlanCity Manager's Recommended 2015 Investment Plan
City Manager's Recommended 2015 Investment Plan
 
2015 Adult Dodgeball Tournament - Registration Packet
2015 Adult Dodgeball Tournament - Registration Packet2015 Adult Dodgeball Tournament - Registration Packet
2015 Adult Dodgeball Tournament - Registration Packet
 
Youth Winter Soccer League
Youth Winter Soccer LeagueYouth Winter Soccer League
Youth Winter Soccer League
 
Dayton World Soccer Games 2014 - Tournament Bracket
Dayton World Soccer Games 2014 - Tournament BracketDayton World Soccer Games 2014 - Tournament Bracket
Dayton World Soccer Games 2014 - Tournament Bracket
 
Dayton Day Tennis 2014
Dayton Day Tennis 2014Dayton Day Tennis 2014
Dayton Day Tennis 2014
 
Dayton World Soccer Games 2014 - REGISTRATION PACKET
Dayton World Soccer Games 2014 - REGISTRATION PACKETDayton World Soccer Games 2014 - REGISTRATION PACKET
Dayton World Soccer Games 2014 - REGISTRATION PACKET
 
Climate Change in the Dayton, Ohioian Mind
Climate Change in the Dayton, Ohioian MindClimate Change in the Dayton, Ohioian Mind
Climate Change in the Dayton, Ohioian Mind
 
Da Vinci Collaborative - Project Overview
Da Vinci Collaborative - Project OverviewDa Vinci Collaborative - Project Overview
Da Vinci Collaborative - Project Overview
 
Neighborhood Clean-Up Application
Neighborhood Clean-Up ApplicationNeighborhood Clean-Up Application
Neighborhood Clean-Up Application
 

Recently uploaded

Competitive Advantage slide deck___.pptx
Competitive Advantage slide deck___.pptxCompetitive Advantage slide deck___.pptx
Competitive Advantage slide deck___.pptx
ScottMeyers35
 
Cara Gugurkan Pembuahan Secara Alami Dan Cepat ABORSI KANDUNGAN 087776558899
Cara Gugurkan Pembuahan Secara Alami Dan Cepat ABORSI KANDUNGAN 087776558899Cara Gugurkan Pembuahan Secara Alami Dan Cepat ABORSI KANDUNGAN 087776558899
Cara Gugurkan Pembuahan Secara Alami Dan Cepat ABORSI KANDUNGAN 087776558899
Cara Menggugurkan Kandungan 087776558899
 

Recently uploaded (20)

"Plant health, safe trade and digital technology." International Day of Plant...
"Plant health, safe trade and digital technology." International Day of Plant..."Plant health, safe trade and digital technology." International Day of Plant...
"Plant health, safe trade and digital technology." International Day of Plant...
 
Competitive Advantage slide deck___.pptx
Competitive Advantage slide deck___.pptxCompetitive Advantage slide deck___.pptx
Competitive Advantage slide deck___.pptx
 
sponsor for poor old age person food.pdf
sponsor for poor old age person food.pdfsponsor for poor old age person food.pdf
sponsor for poor old age person food.pdf
 
2024: The FAR, Federal Acquisition Regulations, Part 31
2024: The FAR, Federal Acquisition Regulations, Part 312024: The FAR, Federal Acquisition Regulations, Part 31
2024: The FAR, Federal Acquisition Regulations, Part 31
 
PPT Item # 9 2ndQTR Financial & Inv. Report
PPT Item # 9 2ndQTR Financial & Inv. ReportPPT Item # 9 2ndQTR Financial & Inv. Report
PPT Item # 9 2ndQTR Financial & Inv. Report
 
The 2024 World Wildlife Crime Report tracks all these issues, trends and more...
The 2024 World Wildlife Crime Report tracks all these issues, trends and more...The 2024 World Wildlife Crime Report tracks all these issues, trends and more...
The 2024 World Wildlife Crime Report tracks all these issues, trends and more...
 
Cara Gugurkan Pembuahan Secara Alami Dan Cepat ABORSI KANDUNGAN 087776558899
Cara Gugurkan Pembuahan Secara Alami Dan Cepat ABORSI KANDUNGAN 087776558899Cara Gugurkan Pembuahan Secara Alami Dan Cepat ABORSI KANDUNGAN 087776558899
Cara Gugurkan Pembuahan Secara Alami Dan Cepat ABORSI KANDUNGAN 087776558899
 
BioandPicforRepKendrick_LastUpdatedMay2024
BioandPicforRepKendrick_LastUpdatedMay2024BioandPicforRepKendrick_LastUpdatedMay2024
BioandPicforRepKendrick_LastUpdatedMay2024
 
Item # 7-8 - 6900 Broadway P&Z Case # 438
Item # 7-8 - 6900 Broadway P&Z Case # 438Item # 7-8 - 6900 Broadway P&Z Case # 438
Item # 7-8 - 6900 Broadway P&Z Case # 438
 
PPT Item # 7&8 6900 Broadway P&Z Case # 438
PPT Item # 7&8 6900 Broadway P&Z Case # 438PPT Item # 7&8 6900 Broadway P&Z Case # 438
PPT Item # 7&8 6900 Broadway P&Z Case # 438
 
Honasa Consumer Limited Impact Report 2024.pdf
Honasa Consumer Limited Impact Report 2024.pdfHonasa Consumer Limited Impact Report 2024.pdf
Honasa Consumer Limited Impact Report 2024.pdf
 
tOld settlement register shouldnotaffect BTR
tOld settlement register shouldnotaffect BTRtOld settlement register shouldnotaffect BTR
tOld settlement register shouldnotaffect BTR
 
PPT Item # 5 -- Announcements Powerpoint
PPT Item # 5 -- Announcements PowerpointPPT Item # 5 -- Announcements Powerpoint
PPT Item # 5 -- Announcements Powerpoint
 
Spring 2024 Issue Punitive and Productive Suffering
Spring 2024 Issue Punitive and Productive SufferingSpring 2024 Issue Punitive and Productive Suffering
Spring 2024 Issue Punitive and Productive Suffering
 
ℂall Girls Thane Hire Me Neha 9920874524 Top Class ℂall Girl Serviℂe Available
ℂall Girls  Thane  Hire Me Neha 9920874524 Top Class ℂall Girl Serviℂe Availableℂall Girls  Thane  Hire Me Neha 9920874524 Top Class ℂall Girl Serviℂe Available
ℂall Girls Thane Hire Me Neha 9920874524 Top Class ℂall Girl Serviℂe Available
 
Nitrogen filled high expansion foam in open Containers
Nitrogen filled high expansion foam in open ContainersNitrogen filled high expansion foam in open Containers
Nitrogen filled high expansion foam in open Containers
 
NGO working for orphan children’s education kurnool
NGO working for orphan children’s education kurnoolNGO working for orphan children’s education kurnool
NGO working for orphan children’s education kurnool
 
POKKUVARAVU OF RR property-directions for mutation
POKKUVARAVU OF RR property-directions  for mutationPOKKUVARAVU OF RR property-directions  for mutation
POKKUVARAVU OF RR property-directions for mutation
 
Electric Vehicle infrastructure planning in Rural Planning Organizations
Electric Vehicle infrastructure planning in Rural Planning OrganizationsElectric Vehicle infrastructure planning in Rural Planning Organizations
Electric Vehicle infrastructure planning in Rural Planning Organizations
 
Item ## 4a -- April 29, 2024 CCM Minutes
Item ## 4a -- April 29, 2024 CCM MinutesItem ## 4a -- April 29, 2024 CCM Minutes
Item ## 4a -- April 29, 2024 CCM Minutes
 

Greater West Dayton Corridor Strategy: A Framework for Investment

  • 1. 1 Greater West Dayton Corridor Strategy ‘A Framework for Investment’ Summary October 13, 2014 Overview In 2012, the West Dayton Development Fund Advisory Committee decided to move forward to fund a comprehensive corridor study for West Dayton. The geography for the study would cover all of the Innerwest and Southwest Priority Board areas. While there have been many studies, planning and project efforts that have occurred over the last 35 years or so, a comprehensive analysis and study of West Dayton Corridors has not taken place since the 1970’s. In the 1970’s, Dayton developed and adopted the West Dayton Road Network strategy. It looked far into the future to identify strategic major improvements to enhance the road network. The goal was to significantly improve access to major West Dayton employers (General Motors and the Veterans Administration, for example) and possible development sites (former Sucher meat packing site and the McCall Printing site). At that time, Dayton was seeking to pre-empt any impacts which might occur to the marketplace if the effort to build the I-675 connector became successful. Dayton opposed the construction of the suburban southeast beltway at that time because it was believed that the beltway would siphon jobs from within the city to the suburban communities. The West Dayton Road Network strategy sought to strengthen the economic base of the city (West Dayton in particular) by improving easy, convenient and timely access while seeking to improve the physical image of the community with the building of attractive, tree-lined parkways and boulevards. The outcome of the effort resulted in the planning, design and construction of Edwin C. Moses Boulevard, James H. McGee Boulevard, C.J. McLin Parkway (US 35 West) and associated modest connecting improvements along the Germantown corridor. It has taken years to begin to see the advances that those corridor investments helped to create. Most notably, Edwin C. Moses Boulevard has seen a transformation to a major regional education/healthcare/institution corridor that experienced significant investment as well as a major image shift. Much can also be said of the McLin Parkway and McGee Boulevard corridors. These efforts occurred as Dayton and the region experienced seismic shifts from 20th century manufacturing. Dayton lost thousands of manufacturing jobs and businesses in that period. With the
  • 2. 2 loss of those jobs, corresponding losses in households which occupied the homes and neighborhoods that housed manufacturing workers occurred. The impact of the job losses in the manufacturing sector were compounded when the region built the I-675 corridor and continue today with the most recent completion of the Austin Boulevard interchange. While the region has spread out more than 50% in geographic area since the 1970’s, the Dayton regional population has slightly decreased. While there has been significant churning within the regional job market, there have not been trends to indicate that there has been any overall significant increase in the regional jobs market. While the above conditions have had significant impact on Dayton and its challenges, West Dayton has experienced a disproportionate share of those challenges given the large base of 20th century manufacturing companies and jobs that evaporated in that same time period. It was within that perspective that the West Dayton Development Fund Advisory Committee acted to invest time, effort and resources to take a fresh new look at the present and future status of strategic West Dayton corridors and their potential impacts. The Process The process for the study and research effort stimulated the beginnings of a community conversation which broadened the breadth of that conversation. First of all, the ‘Greater West Dayton Corridor Strategy – A Framework for Investment’ is not a plan. It was initially launched as a research and study-based process to provide direction for the next generation of infrastructure investment in thoroughfares, corridors and parkways in West Dayton. The resultant research approach has produced important and intriguing information and data regarding assets, investments, trends, challenges and opportunities in the study area. The process evolved into an opportunity to engage a broad range of key West Dayton stakeholders in a community conversation to explore possibilities for a new, future West Dayton by linking strategic reimaging with the leveraging and targeting of investment. The Dayton model of collaboration (over the last 15 years or so) is to advance and leverage community and economic investment and development through partnering, collaboration and civic engagement. The model has been leveraging community leadership (for example, Phoenix, Genesis, DaVinci, Wright- Dunbar, Neighborhood School Centers, etc.). It is within that
  • 3. 3 context, that the ‘Greater West Dayton Corridor Strategy – A Framework for Investment’ is providing a community opportunity to help strengthen existing partnering efforts and function as a platform for the formation of new collaborations. Framework Intent With this type of research and asset-based approach, the process was intended to achieve the following: - Create an opportunity to formulate a new, forward-looking 21st century corridor development strategy that will: o Envision how the strategic corridors of West Dayton will look, how they will function, how they ought to interconnect with assets and opportunities, what investment possibilities might be leveraged, how they might convey the stories about the past, present and future of the Greater West Dayton community – and – and how those stories might impact a refreshed image of West Dayton and result in future investment. o Apply ‘livable streets’ urban design concepts to strategic corridors and craft a 5 to 10 year strategy for developing, funding and implementing these opportunities. - Develop short and long-term, opportunity-based strategies, programs and development projects for residential, institutional, educational, commercial and industrial uses as well as for greening and open space development that would be driven by community coalitions, collaborations and partnerships. The Emergent, Strategic, Asset-Based Approach to Investment and Development for Dayton Since the late 1990’s, Dayton has been engaged in a continuous, organic process of redefining, rethinking and reimaging itself in the following manner (Highlights): - Focus on the asset base, strategic investments and seek to leverage those; - Support the creation and expansion of 21st century, technology-based job development; - Support, facilitate and grow place-based collaborations; o Genesis, Phoenix, DaVinci, Renaissance, Greater Wright-Dunbar, the Greater Downtown, Greater Rubicon Park, the Aerospace Hub Network, Neighborhood School Centers, etc. - Rethink Dayton streets as Livable Streets and focus on an overall, citywide image changing, strategic corridor strategy; - Strategically rebuild and reinvest in infrastructure while creating new Dayton public work landmarks; - Remove significant numbers of physically and outdated obsolete structures and manage the shift to reimage a community of both new and emerging green and garden neighborhood areas; - Encourage and attract the entry of immigrants to Dayton as an Immigrant Friendly community; - Lastly, help to emerge, craft and support a vision for Dayton as a City of Learners to improve educational achievement, create future
  • 4. 4 employment options for Dayton residents and create opportunities to link for neighborhoods, businesses and institutions to connect with neighborhood and community schools. Economic Underpinning – Looking Forward Over the last 2 generations, the economic underpinning of West Dayton, the City of Dayton and the region (within the context of the emergent global economy) has changed forever. The traditional, less- efficient 20th century model of manufacturing has gone through a major revolution in the U.S. and Dayton. Advanced manufacturing has fused with technology, focusing on the creation of prototypes and products beyond the auto industry and U.S. shores. With the loss of many 20th century, high-paying assembly line and manufacturing jobs, a corresponding number of workers, homeowners, renters, residents, shoppers and students of West Dayton neighborhoods slowly melted away. This trend resulted in increases in home and neighborhood abandonment and higher rates of poverty. Factors within our Region: - The Dayton region has good paying, high-tech jobs within our region that go unfilled for lack of a well-trained workforce that aligns with those needs; - Since the 1970’s, the Dayton region has sprawled out by more than 50% in geographic area while population has slightly decreased; - Contractions in the job base have occurred as real estate product has increased regionally, significantly weakening the Dayton (and West Dayton) real estate market; - Real estate development has not created corresponding economic development on a regional level. Opportunities for Dayton: - A community that still retains a central location and significant access and transportation advantages; - A community that has seen a level of investment in both infrastructure and institutions since 2000 that has not been experienced since the 1960’s (conservatively estimated at about $3.6B); - A community that represents the authentic essence of local history, traditions, heritage and inventiveness – a solid basis for future placemaking and economic competitiveness; - A city that has about 100,000 fewer residents today than it had in the 1960’s. It a less dense city –
  • 5. 5 however – a city that has an opportunity to be reformed and reimagined as a 21st century garden city that may have been a component of the 1911 Olmsted Brothers plan for Dayton; - A city that maintains bountiful educational and healthcare institutions as well as cultural, recreational, entertainment, heritage and transportation assets; - A city whose center wraps around a continuous system of waterways and greenways known as the Miami Conservancy District and animated by Five Rivers MetroParks; - A community that is nurturing and growing a skill base in partnerships and collaborations. Key Facts and Indicators The research of the study process identified some key facts and indicators for consideration in contemplating, thinking about shaping a future view for the greater West Dayton. When viewed as a whole, it appears that a paradox exists in West Dayton (as it does across the entire city). While there are undeniable, troubling challenges facing the community, there are corresponding positive signs of strength, strategic advantage and opportunity: - There are about 25,000 residents in West Dayton today. The 2010 census showed about a 24% decrease of residents when compared to 2010. Dayton has a whole continues to lose population while the region remains relatively flat. However, thousands of units of new housing continue to be built and placed on the regional landscape; - Three West Dayton neighborhoods gained population between 2000 and 2010 – Little Richmond, Stoney Ridge, Five Points; - West Dayton contains about 10,400 acres and represents almost 30% of Dayton in land area; - West Dayton has about 160 churches or faith-based community places where citizens gather to worship and engage in community support activities; - West Dayton contains about 15,000 units of housing with about a 24% vacancy rate. - West Dayton has experienced the construction of more new replacement housing than in any other sector of the city; - West Dayton has an unemployment rate of about 28%. This is higher than the city average and significantly higher that the region; - About 27% of West Dayton residents have some level of higher education; - West Dayton has nine new Dayton Public School educational facilities – more than any other quadrant of the city; - West Dayton has the presence of Sinclair Community College, Central State, Wright State University and University of Dayton facilities; - West Dayton has exceptional access within the city and the region – both in terms of travel time and convenience; - There are about 12,000 jobs in West Dayton today. If the jobs
  • 6. 6 were all filled by West Dayton residents that would average to about one job for every two residents. o Healthcare employs about 4200 people and leads the job numbers; o Manufacturing employs about 1400 people – while large numbers of assembly line jobs were lost over two generations, West Dayton has advanced manufacturing present and growing in the community. - The VA campus employs more than 2500 people in full or part-time jobs making it the largest single employer in West Dayton. In addition, the campus is in the midst of a five-year, $80m+ capital improvement process making it an economic engine within the community and has recently completed an unprecedented campus master plan. - West Dayton has seen more than $780M in major investment between 2001 and 2013, putting it on competitive ground with downtown and the other quadrants of the city. Summary of Framework Components Community and Culture: - Historic/Legacy/Heritage sites - Arts facilities and assets - Sports and recreational venues, facilities and programs - Neighborhood commercial clusters Neighborhoods and Education and Training: - Schools - Higher education - Churches - Community centers and programs - Engaged citizenry Employment Clusters and Business Development: - Institutions - Education and training facilities - Development opportunity areas o Brownfields, grayfields, greenfields - Large and modest scale employers - Business clusters and nodes
  • 7. 7 The greatest opportunity for the future of West Dayton may be to strengthen existing and create new connections to maximize the leverage of the above-mentioned asset base: - Build and strengthen social capital and civic engagement; - Contribute to the reimaging for West Dayton through enhancements and improvements important strategic corridors; - Strengthen access and mobility within the community by improving transportation options such as walking, biking and enhanced use of public transportation. Possible Strategic Opportunities Thoroughfares, Corridors and Parkway Opportunities - Create a vision for the next generation of strategic corridor development to leverage investment; o Link redevelopment planning and project development to infrastructure investments; o Consider the travel experience of all users of the corridors; o Develop a 5 to 10 year strategy to enhance the strategic thoroughfares, corridors and parkways of Greater West Dayton to best connect clusters of opportunity and leverage investment; o Visualize and design the strategic gateways; o Integrate and align with the city wide thoroughfare plan and corridor strategy; o Plan for the corridor interface and image with connecting neighborhoods. - Reimage and Strengthen the Competitive Advantage of Place o Gateways of McLin Parkway (McLin Parkway as a key Dayton and regional corridor for development)  Gettysburg Avenue and the VA interchange  McCall Street and Abbey Interchange  James H. McGee Interchange  US 35 and I-75 Interchange - Reimage and Strengthen the View of the Community o Third Street, Germantown, Gettysburg, McGee Corridors  Enhance commercial clusters  Opportunities for institutions and business stakeholders to adopt and provide foster care for key sections of the corridors  Evolve and grow the parkway concept along the sections of the corridors where demolition has occurred and will be occurring  Third Street as a local, regional and national Heritage Corridor
  • 8. 8  McGee/Wolf Creek Corridor as a green, recreational and nature corridor - Reimage and Strengthen Neighborhoods, Streets and Parkways o Hoover, Oakridge, Broadway and Others  Enhance neighborhood and community business clusters  Opportunities for neighborhood and community institutions to adopt and provide foster care for key sections of corridors  Strategic demolition and greening on important and well-travelled neighborhood streets Possible Corporate Partnering Opportunities - Encourage, Build and Support Partnerships and Collaborations o Institutions and major employers:  Standard Register, Dayton VA Medical Center, Quickstep Composites, Sugar Creek Packing Company, Malt Products, others; o Cultivate strategic partnerships in an effort to retain and create jobs in market-driven sectors; o Continue to advance planning and facilitate redevelopment of key West Dayton Brownfield, Grayfield and Greenfield development sites (examples):  Westview Industrial (Business) Park, Wright Factory Business Park, Northwest Industrial Park Possible Community and Corporate Partnering Opportunities - Building and capitalizing on cultural heritage: o Advocacy and Support for the Veterans Administration 20-Year Master Plan:  National Register Historic District within the VA Campus;  Potential for locating a national veterans archive;  Quality Medical Services for all Veterans.
  • 9. 9 o Additional theming of strategic corridors:  E.C Moses – healthcare and cultural institutions, Third Street as a Heritage Corridor connecting the VA, Wright airplane factory, Wright-Dunbar, Wright-Patt, and others. o Potentially crafting and layering of existing and possible new heritage trails – such as adding a Dayton Civil Rights Trail to enhance and complement the Dayton Aviation Trail. - Continue to rethink and actively reimage neighborhoods: o Which are the Garden Neighborhoods, the Learning Neighborhoods, Intergenerational Neighborhoods; Organically plan, reimage and coordinate one at a time as partnering and leadership opportunities reveal themselves. Possible Community Partnering Opportunities - Encourage, Build and Support Corporate and Community Partnerships and Collaborations: o Education and Neighborhoods - Opportunity- based, leadership driven, supportive partnerships:  Align and link social capital opportunities such as connecting church congregations, corporate and/or institutional volunteers with the schools network to improve educational achievement and attainment;  Workforce development, financial literacy, homeownership. o Brainstorm the possibilities about education and training as a new major 21st century industry for West Dayton; o If education and training were envisioned as a major new 21st century industry for West Dayton, imagine the possibilities of thinking about West Dayton as a great learning campus and the power of that image. Moving Forward The Greater West Dayton Study – ‘A Framework for Investment’ was essentially undertaken to support the efforts to uplift and improve the Greater West Dayton community. The challenges that the communities like the greater West Dayton face are sometimes disregarded by other, less fortunate cities and communities. However in Dayton, a shared model of community leadership is working to advance and address challenges through collaboration and focusing on assets and opportunities. The desired
  • 10. 10 outcome in these endeavors in Dayton is to craft and develop strategies to facilitate and leverage redevelopment and investment. This successful approach to create a more sustainable and stable community is evidenced by the City’s Sustainable Practices Policy and other planning activities. Examples include community anchors such as the Dayton VA Medical Center and support for their Master Plan or other examples of collaborative efforts in such West Dayton neighborhoods like the Westwood, Roosevelt and Wright-Dunbar. As part of this engagement process, the City of Dayton proposes to employ the collaborative, community leadership model to establish an advisory committee comprised of business leaders, community leaders, property owners, city and other local government entities as well as members of the public. Initially, the focus of the advisory committee will be to: - Function as a group to think about the context of the greater good of the entire West Dayton area (as outlined in the study) and provide guidance and leadership to advance and support existing and future ‘hotspots’ of community investment and improvement efforts; - Provide community support to advance the endorsement of the Dayton VA Medical Center Master Plan. - Provide guidance to the conversation to develop a 5 to 10 year strategy to improve, enhance and reimage the strategic thoroughfares, corridors and parkways of Greater West Dayton through infrastructure improvements and investments. - Serve to provide guidance to advance the next step efforts in the planning and development of key major brownfield and greenfield sites including the Westview Business Park, the area anchored by the Wright Airplane Factory site and future opportunities in the Northwest Park Industrial Park while seeking opportunities to leverage additional development. - Function as a community resource to lend brainpower, advice, expertise, input, feedback and wisdom to West Dayton community led efforts as requested or as might be needed. To paraphrase a simple but beautiful quote from Abraham Lincoln: “The best way to predict your future is to create it”
  • 11. 11 Major Dayton Investments From 2001 Through 2013 October 13, 2014 – City of Dayton The City of Dayton has been tracking major investments since 2001. The tracking is ongoing and continually being updated. While Dayton has been shedding both population and jobs for much of a generation, there is a narrative that runs counter to those trends. Dayton has seen more than $3.6B in major investments since 2001. The city has arguably not experienced that level or scale of investment since the 1960’s. The continuing investment in institutions, major businesses and infrastructure does indicate that the asset base of Dayton is showing strength – particularly among institutions and in infrastructure. This is a summary of investments by geographic quadrants as well as the airport and the downtown area. The detail contained within this document represents known investments that have occurred in the west quadrant of Dayton (Innerwest and Southwest Priority Board areas). While the list is extensive, it is not necessarily comprehensive and is certainly incomplete. We encourage you to take time to review the list and we would appreciate any information which you might have to identify investments that we have not included in this summary. If you have additional information, you may e-mail it to John Gower at johndewey2@woh.rr.com or mail it to: John Gower Urban Design Coordinator Office of the City Manager City Hall 101 West Third Street Dayton, Ohio 45402 Any additional information or data that you provide will be appreciated and integrated into the data base of investments
  • 12. 12 Downtown (CBD, Webster Station, Midtown) $718M West (Innerwest, Southwest) $783M Northwest (Northwest, FROC) $360M Northeast $388M Southeast $899M Airport $400M City Wide Right-of-Way Infrastructure $33.7M Total $3.58B + • This is based on conservative estimates of major investments. The larger scale investments are linked with institutions and infrastructure. The estimates account for actual dollars invested for this time period as of 12-31-13.
  • 13. 13 Strategic West Dayton Investments 2001 – 2013 Greater Carillon – West Dayton - E.C Moses Rebuild – 2003 $3M - IRG – Wisconsin Boulevard $11.3M - Marriott Courtyard $20M - I-75 – Phase 1A $58M - Elizabeth Place - 2004 forward $20.9M est. - Ponitz Career Technology Center $38M - Howard Paper site prep $1.5M - Kindred Hospital $35M - Welcome Stadium $1M - Concord Foods $0.28M - Ware Banquet Center – Cincinnati Street $0.08M - Third District Police HQ Interiors – 2007 $.32M - Fifth Street Bridge TE - $400,000 (1/2 to west, ½ to DT) $.2M - Washington Street Bridge 2007 $7.3M (1/2 to west, ½ to DT) $3.65M - Stewart Street Bridge $17.3m (1/2 to west, ½ to Rubicon) $8.2M - Bonbright warehouse $7.2M - Sinclair Automotive $35M - University of Dayton o UD Arena Renovation $13.1M o Baseball/Softball Fields $4M  SUB 260M $ Greater Wright-Dunbar – West Dayton WDI - Properties and Improvements $5.7M - Parking Facilities $1.3M Infrastructure - Improvements at E.C Moses Boulevard – 2003 $0.1M - Dunbar Bridge $2.3M (1/2 to SW/IW, ½ to NW/FROC) $1.15M - Moses Bridge $4.6M (1/2 to SW/IW, ½ to NW/FROC) $2.3M - West Third Streetscape $1.8M - Conover/Zion Parking Lots $2.6M - Broadway Bridge $2.5M (1/2 to SW/IW, ½ to NW/FROC $1.25M - Paul Laurence Dunbar Street enhancement $0.365M - Safe Routes to School $0.5M
  • 14. 14 - Wright-Dunbar Street Rehab – Phase 3 – 2003 $0.45M - Wright-Dunbar Street Rehab – Phase 3, Section 2 – 2005 $0.18M - Wright-Dunbar Street Rehab – Phase 3, Section 3 – 2006 $0.54M - Wright-Dunbar Village Transportation Enhancements – Phase 2 – 2010 $0.49 Non-Profits/Government - Dayton Aviation National Park Building $25M - Paul Laurence Dunbar House Museum Expansion $1.4M - Zion/RTA Cultural Center $3.3M - Dayton Urban League/MVHOC $3M - MVRPC Center for Regional Cooperation $0.3M - Wright-Sites (Dayton Aviation Commission) $0.75M - Mt. Enon Family Life Center $4.5M Educational - Mound Street Academies $0.8M - Central State University Dayton Campus $1.5M - Miami Valley Child Development Center $1.56M - Edison PreK thru 8 $12M Housing - New Housing – ISUS $11.265M - Citirama (2003) $12.5M - Hawthorne Village 2011 $1.5M - Germantown Village 2013 $11.4M - City Forest $11.9M - Ecumenical Homes $8M Business & Healthcare - Cassano Center $5.5M - Drew Center $3M - Pri-Med Physicians $1.1M - STAN Solutions $0.5M - Bing Davis Art Studio & Ebonia Gallery $0.3M - WDAO Radio $.277M - Smokin’s Joes $0.1M - Rashid Properties $0.3M - State Farm Insurance Office $0.2M - Zik’s Family Pharmacy $0.33M - Wright-Patt Credit Union $0.35M - Small business startups $0.525M - Hospice of Dayton $0.375M
  • 15. 15 - Innerwest Priority Board Office $1.5M - Assembly & Test Worldwide $0.175M - Automated Building Components – 2004 $0.25M Recreational - Oak & Ivy park $0.78M - Dakota Center $0.25M - Friendship Park Improvement – 2009 $0.1 Strategic Demolition $ NSP Housing $ Sub for Greater Wright-Dunbar $145M Greater Roosevelt – West Dayton - Dayton Recreation Center $8M - DPS All Boys Academy $13.9M - Roosevelt Homes $4.5M - McCall Driveway and Parking Improvement (Inf) – 2004 $0.39M - McCall’s Brownfield/Repositioning $2.25M - NIBCO Brownfield/Repositioning $1.5M - McGee Boulevard extension to Germantown – 2012 $1.4M - McGee Boulevard Widening - 2003 (at Gettysburg) $2.1M - Bridge Street Bridge Replacement - $4M (1/2 to west, ½ to NW) $2 M - Rosedale Bridge – 2011 - $3.4M (1/2 to West, ½ to NW/FROC) $1.7M - McGee Boulevard Rehab – 2011 $1.2M - McGee Boulevard Rehab – 2012 $1.1M - McGee Boulevard Rehab – 2013 $0.925M  SUB $41M Greater Madden Hills – West Dayton - Dunbar High School $18M - Louise Troy Pre-K thru 8 $12M - Wogoman Pre – K thru 8 $12M - Germantown Street Reconstruction – 2005 $3.5M - Huffie’s Barbeque $0.144M - Mallory Park Spray Park – 2004 .07M  SUB for Greater Madden Hills $45.5M
  • 16. 16 Greater VA - West Dayton - National Composite Center – Advanced material Campus $1.5M - Lyons Place - 2009 $9.8M - Ohio Avenue Commons (VA) $2.5M - Nanotek Instruments $1M - Arlington Courts demolition $1M - Greater Dayton Heritage Redevelopment (Formerly Delphi) $5M - VA Campus upgrades $131M - Arlington Park Spray park – 2004 $.07M  SUB for Greater VA $151.8 M Southwest/West Housing - Dayton Homes I $8.5M - Lofts at Hoover - 2007 $5.6M - Stratford Place - 2006 $4.5M - New Dayton Homes I $7M - Sunlight Homes - 2006 $5.6M - Almond Village $6.0M - Stoney Ridge – 2008 $6.4M - Men’s Gateway Shelter $4.8M - DMHA o Malden/Hollencamp - 2009 $0.35M o Limestone/Modena - 2009 $0.4M Schools - Thurgood Marshall $25.5M - Residence Park Pre-k Thru 8 $12M - Westwood Pre-K thru 8 $12M Infrastructure - Petunia Drive - 2001 $0.9M - Parks & Rec asphalt resurfacing - 2002 $0.3M - Clemmer Street reconstruction – 2003 $0.3M - West Dayton Splash Parks – 2003 $0.21M - Gettysburg Rehabilitation – 2004 $2.4M - Parks & Rec Asphalt Resurfacing – 2004 $0.09M - Stony Hollow Road cul-de-sac – 2007 $0.07M - Germantown Utility Relocations – 2007 $.1M - City railroad Track realignment – 2008 $0.5M - Goodlow Avenue bridge Replacement/Culvert – 2009 $0.22M - Water Main Replacement – McArthur/Germantown -2004 $0.79M
  • 17. 17 - Water Main Installation – Nicholas Road – 2009 $0.6M - Asphalt resurfacing – 2004 $0.06M - Traffic Signal Replacements – Elmhurst/Third & Others – 2010 $1.725M - Gettysburg/Third & Others – 2010 $0.75M - Hoover/Culvert Replacement – 2012 $.68 Business - Sugarcreek $32.9M - Lorrits-Neilson Funeral Home $0.45M  SUB for southwest/west $140M Strategic Demolition $ TOTAL for all West (Innerwest and Southwest) $783M