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LEARNING, SOCIAL THEORY, FIELD
TRIPS AND MOBILE DEVICES: A
LITERATURE REVIEW
Nicola Beddall-Hill
Twitter: CityMobileAngel
...
Background to research
Studentship
supported by ESRC
as part of TLRP TEL
programme and
attached to the
Ensemble project.
F...
Introduction: Review of literature
• An interdisciplinary approach to investigate
complex learning processes on field trip...
Learning
• TEL: How do learners learn with technology?
• TEL has a strong positivist legacy
• But it ignores the influence...
Social theory
Extension on boundary objects
• Deeper reading around boundary objects
• Original article by Star & Griesemer (1989)
• Cov...
New section on Distributed Cognition
• Roots in cognitive science
• Ethnographic methods
Pedagogical benefits of field trips
• Unique and complex
• Help develop understanding and subject
knowledge.
• Rite of pas...
learning on field trips
• Research largely positivist.
• Earlier studies initially on memory and recall
(Mackenzie and Whi...
Mobile devices & field trips
Conclusion
Gaps in the area:
1.Quantitative data and a positivist approach
dominance: use instead qualitative
observationa...
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
This work was carried out as part of an ESRC
studentship at City University, London, attached to the
ESRC...
• By viewing the devices as artefacts, which
have influence and are influenced by the setting
this study will aim to uncov...
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Iadis 2010 learning, social theory, field trips and mobile devices conference paper presentation

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Iadis 2010 learning, social theory, field trips and mobile devices conference paper presentation

  1. 1. LEARNING, SOCIAL THEORY, FIELD TRIPS AND MOBILE DEVICES: A LITERATURE REVIEW Nicola Beddall-Hill Twitter: CityMobileAngel Nicola.beddall.1@city.ac.uk
  2. 2. Background to research Studentship supported by ESRC as part of TLRP TEL programme and attached to the Ensemble project. Focus upon learning with mobile devices in the ‘wild’. Using a head mounted camera to observe knowledge construction during collaborative activities. Clip from Coniston Field trip 2009 using a head mounted camera
  3. 3. Introduction: Review of literature • An interdisciplinary approach to investigate complex learning processes on field trips • Draws on a variety of disciplines • Different epistemological and ontological traditions makes comparison difficult • This work is situated within a constructivist framework • Exploration of social theories applied STS, specifically in relation to artefacts. does not necessarily influence behaviour • The paper reviews the key domains bearing upon teaching and learning around fieldwork
  4. 4. Learning • TEL: How do learners learn with technology? • TEL has a strong positivist legacy • But it ignores the influence of social practices • Instead social perspectives portray knowledge as emergent, arising from social practice and thus constructed rather than ‘found’. • Now dominate in TEL, advocate learning through different • Active experimentation, personal or through shared construction of knowledge and social interaction (Vygotsky, 1986; Lave and Wenger, 1991). This study will focus on the later where individuals learn through the dialogue created in social interaction and collaborative activity. An appropriate theoretical framing for analysis for this may come from social theory.
  5. 5. Social theory
  6. 6. Extension on boundary objects • Deeper reading around boundary objects • Original article by Star & Griesemer (1989) • Cover a variety of disciplines • Majority use an ethnographic approach • HIGHLY detailed often engaging in months of observations and interviews • Most have a theoretical basis in their discipline– such as organisational theory and use boundary objects as a tool to explore interactions. • But few make explicit how they revealed boundary objects • Many use boundary objects at a surface level not fully respecting the concept’s depth and information infrastructures surrounding them (Trompette & Vinck, 2009) • Often is not clear what kind of boundary object uncovered
  7. 7. New section on Distributed Cognition • Roots in cognitive science • Ethnographic methods
  8. 8. Pedagogical benefits of field trips • Unique and complex • Help develop understanding and subject knowledge. • Rite of passage in the training of geoscientists (Maskall and Stokes, 2008). • Boyle et al, (2003) believe they play a pivotal role in realizing student integration on a social and academic level. • Normally a positive experience but can be unsettling (Fuller et al, 2006) • But little pedagogical evidence to support these views
  9. 9. learning on field trips • Research largely positivist. • Earlier studies initially on memory and recall (Mackenzie and White, 1982) • Then motivational aspects (Kern and Carpenter, 1986). • Fieldwork is a social activity and interaction can aid the construction of knowledge and meaning, shared experiences with peers and experts can instill behaviour and beliefs inherent in their discipline but this approach has received little attention (Maskall and Stokes, 2008).
  10. 10. Mobile devices & field trips
  11. 11. Conclusion Gaps in the area: 1.Quantitative data and a positivist approach dominance: use instead qualitative observational data utilising a head mounted camera (Beddall-Hill and Raper 2009). 2.Few postgraduate field trips. 3.Limited research on social interaction during field trips and none on the impact mobile devices have on the learning activities and processes or visa versa within this setting.
  12. 12. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was carried out as part of an ESRC studentship at City University, London, attached to the ESRC & EPSRC TLRP TEL project ‘Ensemble’. The author would like to thank her family and Victoria Crump for their assistance and Professor Jonathan Raper for his comments on an earlier draft.
  13. 13. • By viewing the devices as artefacts, which have influence and are influenced by the setting this study will aim to uncover their pedagogical benefit and also compare the use of personal devices versus brought teaching devices with a view to feedback into future curriculum design

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