Pierre Meulien Presentation: The Innovation Economy: How Genomics could change your world

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The Innovation City: Pierre Meulien Presentation: The Innovation Economy: How Genomics could change your world

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Pierre Meulien Presentation: The Innovation Economy: How Genomics could change your world

  1. 1. The Innovation Economy: How Genomics could change your world Pierre Meulien President and CEO, Genome Canada October 2013
  2. 2. What City Age Attendees May Be Interested In ! • The food we produce and consume- its quality, safety and identity • The accountability we have for our own health maintenance • Respect for the biodiversity in both rural and urban areas • The safety and security of water supply for human consumption (environment) • The storage and management of information especially as it regards privacy concerns and links to human rights
  3. 3. Population Energy Food Climate
  4. 4. WORLD POPULATION GROWTH
  5. 5. Biology is central to many of the challenges we are facing If the 20th century was that of the silicon revolution……. The 21st century will be that of BIOLOGY
  6. 6. 2009
  7. 7. Main Biotechnology Fields There are three principal ways biotechnology is applied: 1. Primary Production – Primary production includes all living natural resources, such as forests, plant crops, livestock animals, insects, fish and other marine resources 2. Health – Health applications include pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, nutraceuticals and some medical devices 3. Industry – Industrial applications cover chemicals, plastics, enzymes, mining, pulp and paper, biofuels, and environmental applications such as bioremediation to clean up polluted soils
  8. 8. Main Biotechnology Fields There are three principal ways biotechnology is applied: 1. Primary Production – Primary production includes all living natural resources, such as forests, plant crops, livestock animals, insects, fish and other marine resources 2. Health – Health applications include pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, nutraceuticals and some medical devices 3. Industry – Industrial applications cover chemicals, plastics, enzymes, mining, pulp and paper, biofuels, and environmental applications such as bioremediation to clean up polluted soils
  9. 9. If it lives on this planet… …it has a GENOME
  10. 10. GENOMES are made out of DNA DNA contains the “code of life” which can be “read” Our ability to read this code has been revolutionized over the past decade
  11. 11. 11
  12. 12. The first human genome took 10 years and $3 Billion to decipher Any one of several Genome Centres in Canada can now complete the same task in 2 days for $3K
  13. 13. SO WHAT??
  14. 14. 1 Story… Undiagnosed Neurodegeneration http://www.ottawacitizen.com/technology December 4, 2011
  15. 15. Personalized Medicine Spectrum of Genetic Contribution to Disease Most common chronic diseases with many genetic factors but also major environmental factors contributing to disease onset Very rare single gene disorders More common single gene disorders • CF • Hemophilia • MD • HD Disorders with prominent genetic contribution • Childhood cancer • BRCA 1/2 Breast cancer • Some forms of autism spectrum disorders • Adverse Drug Reactions Genetic susceptibility to certain common diseases • Colon cancer • Certain cardiovascular diseases • Certain forms of Alzheimer
  16. 16. DNA is in all forms of life on earth We can use DNA based tools to study Biodiversity
  17. 17. Building A DNA-Based ID System For All Species
  18. 18. Barcoding the Planet (2012) 1 - 10 11 - 100 >100
  19. 19. International Barcode of Life Paul Hebert (U. of Guelph) Global DNA-based species registration system based on sequence of short mitochondrial DNA fragment Goal: • 5 Million Specimens • 500,000 Species • in 5 years • 27 Partner Nations >120 Research Groups
  20. 20. SO WHAT??
  21. 21. New York City seafood sellers don’t know a tuna from a tilapia. Close to 60% of big retail stores, and 40% of mom-and-pop locations, sold fish that was mislabeled, a new study reveals
  22. 22. European horsemeat scandal turns into blame game
  23. 23. Ontario residents can breathe a sigh of relief. Experts just completed a random DNA check of beef burgers at Burger King, Harvey’s, McDonald’s, Wendy’s, Dairy Queen and A & W. They also looked at frozen food products, including those from Lick’s, Schneiders, Loblaws, Webers, Food Basics and M &M Meat Shops. Everything tested at the Canadian Centre for DNA Barcoding, based at the University of Guelph, came back as 100 per cent beef, they reported Monday.
  24. 24. The Origins of Life
  25. 25. BEEM: Bioproducts and Enzymes from Environmental Metagenomes Elizabeth Edwards (U. of Toronto) David Major (Geosyntec Consultants) • Optimization of anaerobic digestion in pulp & paper mill • Bioremediation of chlorinated solvents
  26. 26. Tembec Temiscaming Bio-Refinery: A model for the future bioeconomy Forest Lumber Mill Pulp Mill Pulp Chips Biomas s Lumber, Paneling Slash Bark Paper, Boxes, Cartons, Tissue, Diapers, Coatings, Textiles, Food, Pharmaceuticals Power Plant Methane Energy Cooking Liquor Anaerobic Digestor Fermentation to Ethanol; Byproduct: Lignosulfonates Sludge All Mill Wastewater WW Treatment
  27. 27. Bioremediation of chlorinated solvents The Story of KB-1 Dirt in a bottle: microcosms Trichloroethene Select & Enrich Understand Commercial production & field application 10 years time Genomic knowledge promises significant acceleration
  28. 28. Data Overload - Informatics
  29. 29. Genomics • Disruptive Technology • Crosses all areas of the life sciences • Will have profound impacts on:  How we view our own personal health and well-being  How we produce food and ensure it’s safety  How we monitor our environment and sustain precious natural resources • We need to introduce (integrate) these new technologies into society in a responsible way
  30. 30. Thank you

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